Microbes and Environments
Online ISSN : 1347-4405
Print ISSN : 1342-6311
ISSN-L : 1342-6311
Volume 30 , Issue 4
Showing 1-8 articles out of 8 articles from the selected issue
Research Highlight
Regular Papers
  • Pongdet Piromyou, Pongpan Songwattana, Teerana Greetatorn, Takashi Oku ...
    Type: Regular Papers
    2015 Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 291-300
    Published: 2015
    Released: December 22, 2015
    [Advance publication] Released: November 19, 2015
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    Plant associations by bradyrhizobia have been detected not only in leguminous plants, but also in non-leguminous species including rice. Bradyrhizobium sp. SUTN9-2 was isolated from Aeschynomene americana L., which is a leguminous weed found in the rice fields of Thailand. This strain promoted the highest total rice (Oryza sativa L. cultivar Pathum Thani 1) dry weight among the endophytic bradyrhizobial strains tested, and was, thus, employed for the further characterization of rice-Bradyrhizobium interactions. Some known bacterial genes involved in bacteria-plant interactions were selected. The expression of the type III secretion component (rhcJ), type IV secretion component (virD4), and pectinesterase (peces) genes of the bacterium were up-regulated when the rice root exudate was added to the culture. When SUTN9-2 was inoculated into rice seedlings, the peces, rhcJ, virD4, and exopolysaccharide production (fliP) genes were strongly expressed in the bacterium 6–24 h after the inoculation. The gene for glutathione-S-transferase (gst) was slightly expressed 12 h after the inoculation. In order to determine whether type III secretion system (T3SS) is involved in bradyrhizobial infections in rice plants, wild-type SUTN9-2 and T3SS mutant strains were inoculated into the original host plant (A. americana) and a rice plant (cultivar Pathum Thani 1). The ability of T3SS mutants to invade rice tissues was weaker than that of the wild-type strain; however, their phenotypes in A. americana were not changed by T3SS mutations. These results suggest that T3SS is one of the important determinants modulating rice infection; however, type IV secretion system and peces may also be responsible for the early steps of rice infection.
  • Akira Kobayashi, Yuki Ohdaira Kobayashi, Nobutaka Someya, Seishi Ikeda
    Type: Regular Papers
    2015 Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 301-309
    Published: 2015
    Released: December 22, 2015
    [Advance publication] Released: December 09, 2015
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    Eight genotypes of potato plants with different resistance levels against common scab were grown in a field infested with Streptomyces turgidiscabies. DNA was extracted from the roots, tubers, and rhizosphere soils of each of the eight genotypes at the flowering stage, and the quantity of S. turgidiscabies genomic DNA was assessed by real-time PCR using a TaqMan probe. The results obtained showed that the different potato genotypes had significant impacts on the population levels of S. turgidiscabies between resistant and susceptible genotypes in the tubers, but not in the roots or rhizosphere soils. Clone analyses of 16S rRNA gene libraries from the eight potato genotypes identified three phyla (Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria) as dominant taxa in root and tuber clone libraries, while a clustering analysis identified 391 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at the species level. Eleven OTUs closely related to Aquicella siphonis, Arthrobacter nicotinovorans, Streptomyces rishiriensis, Rhodococcus baikonurensis, Rhizobium radiobacter, Rhizobium etli, Phyllobacterium myrsinacearum, Paenibacillus pabuli, Paenibacillus alginolyticus, and Bacillus halmapalus were detected in the root or tuber libraries of all the potato genotypes examined. Furthermore, an abundance of OTUs related to Aquicella and Rhodococcus was observed in the rhizospheres of resistant and susceptible potato genotypes, respectively. Based on this ecological information, an efficient survey may be conducted for biological agents from the potato rhizosphere.
  • Panlada Tittabutr, Sudarat Sripakdi, Nantakorn Boonkerd, Waraporn Tant ...
    Type: Regular Papers
    2015 Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 310-320
    Published: 2015
    Released: December 22, 2015
    [Advance publication] Released: December 09, 2015
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    Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 forms symbiotic interactions with mung bean (Vigna radiata) and contains lrpL-acdS genes, which encode the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase enzyme that cleaves ACC, a precursor of plant ethylene synthesis. Since ethylene interferes with nodule formation in some legumes and plays a role in senescence in plant cells, BL3-enhancing ACC deaminase activity (BL3+) and defective mutant (BL3) strains were constructed in order to investigate the effects of this enzyme on symbiosis and nodule senescence. Nodulation competitiveness was weaker in BL3 than in the wild-type, but was stronger in BL3+. The inoculation of BL3 into mung bean resulted in less plant growth, a lower nodule dry weight, and smaller nodule number than those in the wild-type, whereas the inoculation of BL3+ had no marked effects. However, similar nitrogenase activity was observed with all treatments; it was strongly detected 3 weeks after the inoculation and gradually declined with time, indicating senescence. The rate of plant nodulation by BL3+ increased in a time-dependent manner. Nodules occupied by BL3 formed smaller symbiosomes, and bacteroid degradation was more prominent than that in the wild-type 7 weeks after the inoculation. Changes in biochemical molecules during nodulation were tracked by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and the results obtained confirmed that aging processes differed in nodules occupied by BL3 and BL3. This is the first study to show the possible role of ACC deaminase activity in senescence in determinate nodules. Our results suggest that an increase in ACC deaminase activity in this strain does not extend the lifespan of nodules, whereas the lack of this activity may accelerate nodule senescence.
  • Kazutaka Takeshita, Yu Matsuura, Hideomi Itoh, Ronald Navarro, Tomoyuk ...
    Type: Regular Papers
    2015 Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 321-329
    Published: 2015
    Released: December 22, 2015
    [Advance publication] Released: December 09, 2015
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    A number of phytophagous stinkbugs (order Heteroptera: infraorder Pentatomomorpha) harbor symbiotic bacteria in a specific midgut region composed of numerous crypts. Among the five superfamilies of the infraorder Pentatomomorpha, most members of the Coreoidea and Lygaeoidea are associated with a specific group of the genus Burkholderia, called the “stinkbug-associated beneficial and environmental (SBE)” group, which is not vertically transmitted, but acquired from the environment every host generation. A recent study reported that, in addition to these two stinkbug groups, the family Largidae of the superfamily Pyrrhocoroidea also possesses a Burkholderia symbiont. Despite this recent finding, the phylogenetic position and biological nature of Burkholderia associated with Largidae remains unclear. Based on the combined results of fluorescence in situ hybridization, cloning analysis, Illumina deep sequencing, and egg inspections by diagnostic PCR, we herein demonstrate that the largid species are consistently associated with the “plant-associated beneficial and environmental (PBE)” group of Burkholderia, which are phylogenetically distinct from the SBE group, and that they maintain symbiosis through the environmental acquisition of the bacteria. Since the superfamilies Coreoidea, Lygaeoidea, and Pyrrhocoroidea are monophyletic in the infraorder Pentatomomorpha, it is plausible that the symbiotic association with Burkholderia evolved at the common ancestor of the three superfamilies. However, the results of this study strongly suggest that a dynamic transition from the PBE to SBE group, or vice versa, occurred in the course of stinkbug evolution.
Short Communications
  • Koh Fukushima, He Huang, Natsuko Hamamura
    Type: Short Communication
    2015 Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 330-334
    Published: 2015
    Released: December 22, 2015
    [Advance publication] Released: October 17, 2015
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    Arsenic (As) is a widely distributed toxic element in the environment and microorganisms have developed resistance mechanisms in order to tolerate it. The cellular response of the chemoorganotrophic arsenite (As[III])-oxidizing α-Proteobacteria, Sinorhizobium sp. strain A2, to arsenic was examined in the present study. Several proteins associated with arsenite oxidase and As resistance were shown to be accumulated in the presence of As(III). A shift in central carbon metabolism from the tricarboxylic acid pathway to glyoxylate pathway was also observed in response to oxidative stress. Our results revealed the strategy of the As(III)-oxidizing Sinorhizobium strain to mitigate arsenic toxicity and oxidative damage by multiple metabolic adaptations.
  • Yuga Hirakata, Mamoru Oshiki, Kyohei Kuroda, Masashi Hatamoto, Kengo K ...
    Type: Short Communication
    2015 Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 335-338
    Published: 2015
    Released: December 22, 2015
    [Advance publication] Released: December 04, 2015
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    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prokaryotic community structure of the anaerobic ciliate, Metopus sp. using rRNA sequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Metopus sp. was physically separated from anaerobic granular sludge in a domestic wastewater treatment plant and anoxically cultivated for 7 d. 16S rRNA gene sequences from the prokaryotes Methanoregula boonei and Clostridium aminobutyricum were abundantly detected in Metopus ciliates. The FISH analysis using the oligonucleotide probes Mg1200b and Cla568 demonstrated that these prokaryotes were localized within Metopus cells. These results identify M. boonei- and C. aminobutyricum-like prokaryotes as novel endosymbionts of Metopus ciliates.
  • Thi Lan Thanh Bien, Yuki Sato-Takabe, Mitsuko Ogo, Masaru Usui, Satoru ...
    Type: Short Communication
    2015 Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 339-343
    Published: 2015
    Released: December 22, 2015
    [Advance publication] Released: December 04, 2015
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    The persistence of the multi-drug resistance plasmids pAQU1 and IncFIB was examined in bacterial populations under very low selective pressure. We herein demonstrated that these plasmids stably remained not only in the original host, but also in a transconjugant, even after being in a non-culturable state. In seawater microcosms containing Photobacterium damselae 04Ya311 possessing pAQU1, no significant loss of pAQU1 was observed during a 30-d starvation period. The copy numbers of pAQU1 and IncFIB in E. coli were constant. The results of the present study suggest that these plasmids have the ability to remain among various bacteria under oligotrophic conditions with low antibiotic selection pressure.
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