Microbes and Environments
Online ISSN : 1347-4405
Print ISSN : 1342-6311
ISSN-L : 1342-6311
Volume 32 , Issue 1
Showing 1-15 articles out of 15 articles from the selected issue
Research Highlight
Minireview
  • Shawn E. McGlynn
    Type: Minireview
    2017 Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 5-13
    Published: 2017
    Released: March 31, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: March 17, 2017
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    Anaerobic methane oxidation in archaea is often presented to operate via a pathway of “reverse methanogenesis”. However, if the cumulative reactions of a methanogen are run in reverse there is no apparent way to conserve energy. Recent findings suggest that chemiosmotic coupling enzymes known from their use in methylotrophic and acetoclastic methanogens—in addition to unique terminal reductases—biochemically facilitate energy conservation during complete CH4 oxidation to CO2. The apparent enzyme modularity of these organisms highlights how microbes can arrange their energy metabolisms to accommodate diverse chemical potentials in various ecological niches, even in the extreme case of utilizing “reverse” thermodynamic potentials.

Regular Papers
  • Christine D. Santiago, Shogo Yagi, Motoaki Ijima, Tomoya Nashimoto, Ma ...
    Type: Regular Papers
    2017 Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 14-23
    Published: 2017
    Released: March 31, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: February 04, 2017
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    The compatibility of strains is crucial for formulating bioinoculants that promote plant growth. We herein assessed the compatibility of four potential bioinoculants isolated from potato roots and tubers (Sphingomonas sp. T168, Streptomyces sp. R170, Streptomyces sp. R181, and Methylibium sp. R182) that were co-inoculated in order to improve plant growth. We screened these strains using biochemical tests, and the results obtained showed that R170 had the highest potential as a bioinoculant, as indicated by its significant ability to produce plant growth-promoting substances, its higher tolerance against NaCl (2%) and AlCl3 (0.01%), and growth in a wider range of pH values (5.0–10.0) than the other three strains. Therefore, the compatibility of R170 with other strains was tested in combined inoculations, and the results showed that the co-inoculation of R170 with T168 or R182 synergistically increased plant weight over un-inoculated controls, indicating the compatibility of strains based on the increased production of plant growth promoters such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and siderophores as well as co-localization on roots. However, a parallel test using strain R181, which is the same Streptomyces genus as R170, showed incompatibility with T168 and R182, as revealed by weaker plant growth promotion and a lack of co-localization. Collectively, our results suggest that compatibility among bacterial inoculants is important for efficient plant growth promotion, and that R170 has potential as a useful bioinoculant, particularly in combined inoculations that contain compatible bacteria.

  • Thaddée Boudjeko, Romaric Armel Mouafo Tchinda, Mina Zitouni, Joëlle A ...
    Type: Regular Papers
    2017 Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 24-31
    Published: 2017
    Released: March 31, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: March 04, 2017
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    The taxonomy of an actinobacterial strain, designated JJY4T, was established using a polyphasic approach. JJY4T was isolated from the rhizosphere of Chromolaena odorata in Yaoundé (Cameroon) during a project for the selection of biological control agents. Strain JJY4T exhibited antimicrobial activities against bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes. Strain JJY4T also exhibited the traits of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria such as the solubilization of inorganic phosphate, production of siderophores and indole-3-acetic acid, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity. In planta assays performed on cocoa plantlets confirmed that strain JJY4T exhibited strong abilities to promote plant growth and protect against Phytophthora megakarya, the main causal agent of cocoa pod rot. The formation of rugose-ornamented spores in spiral spore chains by strain JJY4T is a typical feature of members found in the Streptomyces violaceusniger clade and, similar to some members of the clade, strain JJY4T produces geldanamycin. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences confirmed this classification and suggests that strain JJY4T be added to the subclade constituted of the type strains Streptomyces malaysiensis DSM 41697T and Streptomyces samsunensis DSM 42010T. However, DNA–DNA relatedness and physiological characteristics allowed for the differentiation of strain JJY4T from its closest phylogenetic relatives. Based on these results, strain JJY4T (=NRRL B-65369, =NBRC 112705) appears to represent a novel species in the S. violaceusniger clade for which the proposed name is Streptomyces cameroonensis sp. nov.

  • Takumi Murakami, Takahiro Segawa, Roman Dial, Nozomu Takeuchi, Shiro K ...
    Type: Regular Papers
    2017 Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 32-39
    Published: 2017
    Released: March 31, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: March 09, 2017
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    The community structure of bacteria associated with the glacier ice worm Mesenchytraeus solifugus was analyzed by amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and their transcripts. Ice worms were collected from two distinct glaciers in Alaska, Harding Icefield and Byron Glacier, and glacier surfaces were also sampled for comparison. Marked differences were observed in bacterial community structures between the ice worm and glacier surface samples. Several bacterial phylotypes were detected almost exclusively in the ice worms, and these bacteria were phylogenetically affiliated with either animal-associated lineages or, interestingly, clades mostly consisting of glacier-indigenous species. The former included bacteria that belong to Mollicutes, Chlamydiae, Rickettsiales, and Lachnospiraceae, while the latter included Arcicella and Herminiimonas phylotypes. Among these bacteria enriched in ice worm samples, Mollicutes, Arcicella, and Herminiimonas phylotypes were abundantly and consistently detected in the ice worm samples; these phylotypes constituted the core microbiota associated with the ice worm. A fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that Arcicella cells specifically colonized the epidermis of the ice worms. Other bacterial phylotypes detected in the ice worm samples were also abundantly recovered from the respective habitat glaciers; these bacteria may be food for ice worms to digest or temporary residents. Nevertheless, some were overrepresented in the ice worm RNA samples; they may also function as facultative gut bacteria. Our results indicate that the community structure of bacteria associated with ice worms is distinct from that in the associated glacier and includes worm-specific and facultative, glacier-indigenous lineages.

  • Yosuke Tashiro, Hiroaki Eida, Satoshi Ishii, Hiroyuki Futamata, Satosh ...
    Type: Regular Papers
    2017 Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 40-46
    Published: 2017
    Released: March 31, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: March 08, 2017
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    A conjugative F plasmid induces mature biofilm formation by Escherichia coli by promoting F-pili-mediated cell-cell interactions and increasing the expression of biofilm-related genes. We herein demonstrated another function for the F plasmid in E. coli biofilms; it contributes to the emergence of genetic and phenotypic variations by spontaneous mutations. Small colony variants (SCVs) were more frequently generated in a continuous flow-cell biofilm than in the planktonic state of E. coli harboring the F plasmid. E. coli SCVs represented typical phenotypic changes such as slower growth, less biofilm formation, and greater resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics than the parent strain. Genomic and complementation analyses indicated that the small colony phenotype was caused by the insertion of Tn1000, which was originally localized in the F plasmid, into the hemB gene. Furthermore, the Tn1000 insertion was removed from hemB in the revertant, which showed a normal colony phenotype. This study revealed that the F plasmid has the potential to increase genetic variations not only by horizontal gene transfer via F pili, but also by site-specific recombination within a single cell.

  • Tomohiro Morohoshi, Takahito Yamaguchi, Xiaonan Xie, Wen-zhao Wang, Ka ...
    Type: Regular Papers
    2017 Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 47-53
    Published: 2017
    Released: March 31, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: February 25, 2017
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    Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aurantiaca StFRB508 regulates phenazine production through N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing. Two sets of AHL-synthase and AHL-receptor genes, phzI/phzR and aurI/aurR, have been identified from the incomplete draft genome of StFRB508. In the present study, the complete genome of StFRB508, comprising a single chromosome of 6,997,933 bp, was sequenced. The complete genome sequence revealed the presence of a third quorum-sensing gene set, designated as csaI/csaR. An LC-MS/MS analysis revealed that StFRB508 produced six types of AHLs, with the most important AHL being N-(3-hydroxyhexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-OH-C6-HSL). PhzI mainly catalyzed the biosynthesis of 3-OH-C6-HSL, while AurI and CsaI catalyzed that of N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone and N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, respectively. A mutation in phzI decreased phenazine production, whereas that in aurI or csaI did not. A phzI aurI csaI triple mutant (508ΔPACI) did not produce phenazine. Phenazine production by 508ΔPACI was stimulated by exogenous AHLs and 3-OH-C6-HSL exerted the strongest effects on phenazine production at the lowest concentration tested (0.1 μM). The plant protection efficacy of 508ΔPACI against an oomycete pathogen was lower than that of wild-type StFRB508. These results demonstrate that the triplicate quorum-sensing system plays an important role in phenazine production by and the biocontrol activity of StFRB508.

  • Atik Ramadhani, Miki Kawada-Matsuo, Hitoshi Komatsuzawa, Takahiko Oho
    Type: Regular Papers
    2017 Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 54-60
    Published: 2017
    Released: March 31, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: March 03, 2017
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    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is emitted from industrial activities, and several chemotrophs possessing Sox enzymes are used for its removal. Oral malodor is a common issue in the dental field and major malodorous components are volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), including H2S and methyl mercaptan. Paracoccus pantotrophus is an aerobic, neutrophilic facultatively autotrophic bacterium that possesses sulfur-oxidizing (Sox) enzymes in order to use sulfur compounds as an energy source. In the present study, we cloned the Sox enzymes of P. pantotrophus GB17 and evaluated their VSC-degrading activities for the prevention of oral malodor. Six genes, soxX, soxY, soxZ, soxA, soxB, and soxCD, were amplified from P. pantotrophus GB17. Each fragment was cloned into a vector for the expression of 6×His-tagged fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. Recombinant Sox (rSox) proteins were purified from whole-cell extracts of E. coli using nickel affinity chromatography. The enzyme mixture was investigated for the degradation of VSCs using gas chromatography. Each of the rSox enzymes was purified to apparent homogeneity, as confirmed by SDS-PAGE. The rSox enzyme mixture degraded H2S in dose- and time-dependent manners. All rSox enzymes were necessary for degrading H2S. The H2S-degrading activities of rSox enzymes were stable at 25–80°C, and the optimum pH was 7.0. The amount of H2S produced by periodontopathic bacteria or oral bacteria collected from human subjects decreased after an incubation with rSox enzymes. These results suggest that the combination of rSox enzymes from P. pantotrophus GB17 is useful for the prevention of oral malodor.

  • Shuhei Yabe, Yasuteru Sakai, Keietsu Abe, Akira Yokota
    Type: Regular Papers
    2017 Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 61-70
    Published: 2017
    Released: March 31, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: March 17, 2017
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    Bacteria with an actinomycetes-like morphology have recently been discovered, and the class Ktedonobacteria was created for these bacteria in the phylum Chloroflexi. They may prove to be a valuable resource with the potential to produce unprecedented secondary metabolites. However, our understanding of their diversity, richness, habitat, and ecological significance is very limited. We herein developed a 16S rRNA gene-targeted, Ktedonobacteria-specific primer and analyzed ktedonobacterial amplicons. We investigated abundance, diversity, and community structure in forest and garden soils, sand, bark, geothermal sediment, and compost. Forest soils had the highest diversity among the samples tested (1181–2934 operational taxonomic units [OTUs]; Chao 1 estimate, 2503–5613; Shannon index, 4.21–6.42). A phylogenetic analysis of representative OTUs revealed at least eight groups within unclassified Ktedonobacterales, expanding the known diversity of this order. Ktedonobacterial communities markedly varied among our samples. The common mesic environments (soil, sand, and bark) were dominated by diverse phylotypes within the eight groups. In contrast, compost and geothermal sediment samples were dominated by known ktedonobacterial families (Thermosporotrichaceae and Thermogemmatisporaceae, respectively). The relative abundance of Ktedonobacteria in the communities, based on universal primers, was ≤0.8%, but was 12.9% in the geothermal sediment. These results suggest that unknown diverse Ktedonobacteria inhabit common environments including forests, gardens, and sand at low abundances, as well as extreme environments such as geothermal areas.

  • Safiullah Habibi, Abdul ghani Ayubi, Naoko Ohkama-Ohtsu, Hitoshi Sekim ...
    Type: Regular Papers
    2017 Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 71-79
    Published: 2017
    Released: March 31, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: March 17, 2017
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    Seventy rhizobial isolates were obtained from the root nodules of two soybean (Glycine max) cultivars: Japanese cultivar Enrei and USA cultivar Stine3300, which were inoculated with different soil samples from Afghanistan. In order to study the genetic properties of the isolates, the DNA sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and symbiotic genes (nodD1 and nifD) were elucidated. Furthermore, the isolates were inoculated into the roots of two soybean cultivars, and root nodule numbers and nitrogen fixation abilities were subsequently evaluated in order to assess symbiotic performance. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, the Afghanistan isolates obtained from soybean root nodules were classified into two genera, Bradyrhizobium and Ensifer. Bradyrhizobium isolates accounted for 54.3% (38) of the isolates, and these isolates had a close relationship with Bradyrhizobium liaoningense and B. yuanmingense. Five out of the 38 Bradyrhizobium isolates showed a novel lineage for B. liaoningense and B. yuanmingense. Thirty-two out of the 70 isolates were identified as Ensifer fredii. An Ensifer isolate had identical nodD1 and nifD sequences to those in B. yuanmingense. This result indicated that the horizontal gene transfer of symbiotic genes occurred from Bradyrhizobium to Ensifer in Afghanistan soil. The symbiotic performance of the 14 tested isolates from the root nodules of the two soybean cultivars indicated that Bradyrhizobium isolates exhibited stronger acetylene reduction activities than Ensifer isolates. This is the first study to genetically characterize soybean-nodulating rhizobia in Afghanistan soil.

Short Communications
  • Ryuji Kondo, Takahiko Okamura
    Type: Short Communication
    2017 Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 80-83
    Published: 2017
    Released: March 31, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: February 11, 2017
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    The functional and numerical responses of the facultative anaerobic heterotrophic nanoflagellate, Suigetsumonas clinomigrationis NIES-3647 to prey density were examined under oxic and anoxic conditions. S. clinomigrationis grew at temperatures between 10 and 30°C and in the salinity range of 3.9–36.9 psu. The maximum specific growth and ingestion rates of S. clinomigrationis were lower under anoxic conditions than under oxic conditions. Half-saturation constants for the growth of S. clinomigrationis were within or greater than the range of bacterial densities in the water column of Lake Suigetsu, suggesting that its growth rate is limited by bacterial prey densities in natural environments.

  • Chakrapong Rangjaroen, Rungroch Sungthong, Benjavan Rerkasem, Neung Te ...
    Type: Short Communication
    2017 Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 84-87
    Published: 2017
    Released: March 31, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: February 21, 2017
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    With the aim of searching for potent diazotrophic bacteria that are free of public health concerns and optimize rice cultivation, the endophytic colonization and plant growth-promoting activities of some endophytic diazotrophic bacteria isolated from rice were evaluated. Among these bacteria, the emerging diazotrophic strains of the genus Novosphingobium effectively associated with rice plant interiors and consequently promoted the growth of rice, even with the lack of a nitrogen source. These results suggest that diazotrophic Novosphingobium is an alternative microbial resource for further development as a safe biological enhancer in the optimization of organic rice cultivation.

  • Tatsunori Kiyokawa, Ryo Usuba, Nozomu Obana, Masatoshi Yokokawa, Masan ...
    Type: Short Communication
    2017 Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 88-91
    Published: 2017
    Released: March 31, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: March 17, 2017
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    Although microbes typically associate with surfaces, detailed observations of surface-associated microbes on natural substrata are technically challenging. We herein introduce a flow channel device named the Stickable Flow Device, which is easily configurable and deployable on various surfaces for the microscopic imaging of environmental microbes. We demonstrated the utility of this device by creating a flow channel on different types of surfaces including live leaves. This device enables the real-time imaging of bacterial biofilms and their substrata. The Stickable Flow Device expands the limits of conventional real-time imaging systems, thereby contributing to a deeper understanding of microbe-surface interactions on various surfaces.

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