The Journal of The Japan Society for New Zealand Studies
Online ISSN : 2432-2733
Print ISSN : 1883-9304
Volume 10
Showing 1-20 articles out of 20 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2003 Volume 10 Pages Cover1-
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2003 Volume 10 Pages Cover2-
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Naoko SAJIMA
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 10 Pages 1-2
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Yoshinori OKADA
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 10 Pages 3-4
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Ryuji KOMATSU
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 10 Pages 5-
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Yasuaki TAKAHASHI
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 10 Pages 6-7
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Tadashi Miyamoto
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 10 Pages 8-19
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    1 Introduction 1.1 Personal Background of this article 1.2 Changes of Age 1.3 Limits of the Article 2 Meaning of Barrier-Free of Universities 3 Barriers to Students with disabilities 4 Lincoln University 5 University of Otago 5.1 Disabilities Week 5.2 Disabilities Office 5.3 University Library 5.4 Interview to Prof Godon 5.5 Blind Foundation of Dunedin 6 Conclusion-Policy of Disabilities of Otago University 6.1 Human Support 6.2 OU Disabilities Action Group 6.3 Mentoring Programme 6.4 Principle
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  • Toshiko Harada
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 10 Pages 20-35
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    The government is making policies to help the elderly to live independently and promoting home support. As a result, many elderly people are enjoying independent lives supported by social welfare. With such government policies in the background, What kind of attitude to health do the New Zealanders adopt in order to maintain physical and mental health and lead independent lives? Ministry of Social Policies says that the primary environmental factors for preserving the independent of the elderly are adequate income, good health and social connections deciding factors for each individual's QOL and also lists feeling of safety and ability to manage oneself as common main factors. Adequate income is necessary for medical care, health insurance, appropriate home and maintenance of reasonable health. Essential factor for the ill or disable elderly to live independently is support and care of the family. Housewives are found to provide the greatest amount of unofficial care. In New Zealand, because of the increasing number of elderly women due to longer life expectancy and spread of care families, more and more people wish to enter care homes and nursing homes. Since the 1980s worry about the mounting cost of medical care and social welfare that accompanies the aging population has prompted the government to encourage home care. In the 1990s when National Party came to power, reform of social welfare system was carried out and the elderly people were asked and independence. 1993 saw serve founding cut to the support provided at care homes and nursing homes. As for the elderly who need help at home, free help is guaranteed from National Health Service. Some healthy and independent elderly people sell their own homes and buy rooms in city-center rest homes. Here, while receiving necessary help, they enjoy free and comfortable life style, taking part in various activity programs provided by the rest homes. Here, many elderly people lead independent lives supported by social welfare. I have surveyed how they maintain their physical and mental health at the independent level, their attitude to health, and how they endeavor to live independently; I am going to discuss how things actually stand. I will see how, in practice, the elderly people respond to the government surveys and policies. It is thought that many symptoms of physical decline in older age are caused by inactive life style. Respondents to my survey prove that moderate exercise and work improve their ability and help them to enjoy good mental health as well.
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  • Hitoshi Kaneyama
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 10 Pages 36-44
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    This paper aims to investigate Witi Ihimaera's novel, The Matriarch, which was published in 1986, twelve years after his second, Whanau, with a great change in his political attitude. In his earlier works including short stories, Ihimaera tends to focus nostalgically on traditional Maori community and culture, making Maori issues less explicit. However, The Matriarch is the novel in which Ihimaera deals directly with the politics of Maori alienation and gropes his way towards the recovery of Maoridom. Firstly, Ihimaera's career and change in writing are surveyed through his works, with the description of political, economical and social circumstances. In the next chapter, the epic form, which Ihimaera seems to deploy in The Matriarch, is discussed, referred to some critical points. The Matriarch is a very complex novel. One of the main reason lies in the fact that the novel has a wide range of reference such as Maori myths, cosmology, Italian opera and the Bible, etc. It is regrettable that much of these was left unexamined in this article. It will be dealt with in a sequel of this paper.
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  • Naoko Fukayama
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 10 Pages 45-54
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    The Waitangi Tribunal is a unique judicial system in New Zealand, which was established under the Treaty of Waitangi Act 1975 at time when protests about unresolved Treaty grievances were at boiling point. The main functions of the Waitangi Tribunal are quite different to those of the general courts, and are to inquire into, and make findings and recommendation to the Crown on, claims related to the Treaty of Waitangi by Maori. At the Tribunal hearings, both claimants and the Crown present the evidences and submissions, and afterwards the Tribunal issues its report on the claims. From reading some outstanding tribunal reports like those on the Ngai Tahu land claims, the Taranaki claims, and the Muriwhenua fishing claims, it can be said that the reconstructed Maori histories are varied. However on the other hand it is also true that all these reports are about the expropriations from the traditional tribal groups by the Crown's colonialism mainly in the 19^<th> century. Recently the controversial reports on Rekohu claims and Waipareira claims were issued. The Rekohu report declared that Moriori were part of Maori and qualified to claim to the Treaty of Waitangi, but also had been first inhabitants with the unique culture on the islands before the intrusion of Ngati Mutunga. The Waipareira report declared that the urban Maori community of Waipareira was also qualified to claim to the Treaty, and should be treated as legitimately as the traditional tribal groups under some administrative services even though it had no tribal origin. They raise important issues about the meanings of Maori and indigenous-ness of Maori, which had been the self-evident premises for reconstructing the history at Waitangi Tribunal. And another type of history is reconstructed in these 2 reports, which had been placed on the periphery not only in the New Zealand national history but also in the traditional Maori history based on the tribal society. Today the Waitangi Tribunal is becoming to be the place where the Maori plural histories are reconstructed.
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  • Kenichi IKEMOTO
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 10 Pages 55-61
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    As the year 2003 is the year of sheep, this essay refers to some topics on the animal on the back of which New Zealand is mythologized to have ridden to fortune. The frozen meat export, which was realized by the superb ingenuity and pioneering spirit of Thomas Brydone and William S. Davidson in the last quarter of the 19th century, brought New Zealand two of her largest export industries, dairy and meat. Among variety of sheep breeds, Merino was first imported into New Zealand and Corriedale was the first sheep breed developed in New Zealand. Apart from major sheep breeds in the country, Dorper, an indigenous South African breed, has recently become the object of attention. It is very new and few in number in New Zealand, but it has many traits which other breeds do not have; no shearing, no crutching, no crutching, adaptability, rapid growth, longevity, to mention some. Golden Shears, the shearing and wool handling competition held annually at Masterton, attracts thousands of spectators as it is not simply a sport event but a performance art.
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  • Hiroyuki Matsuoka
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 10 Pages 62-67
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    A key aspect of New Zealand's immigration issues is the quantity and quality of the immigrants. For example, the National party discusses that the total number of immigrants should be reduced. Moreover, NZ government has to put priority on particular skilled immigrants. Also, the contents of investments by business immigrants should be reexamined to stimulate economic activities of NZ.
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  • Tetsuro TAJIMA
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 10 Pages 68-71
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    VI Katherine Mansfield's birthplace and Jun ETOH Jun ETOH(1933-1999), a celebrated literary critic of Japan, had a chance to visit New Zealand in 1966 at the invitation of Foreign Office of New Zealand. He was pleased to be able to visit Katherine Mansfield's birthplace while he was still living before everything. The article on this visit refers what happened at that time and his relation with Katherine Mansfield. In those days, the birthplace was yet a private house. The old woman living there did not know about Katherine Mansfield. He writes that he realized the fact that Katherine Mansfield had been more liked in Japan and France than in her hometown afresh. He reviews the deep concern with her. He had proceeded his way to literary critic for good reputation on his first critique Memorandum on Mansfield that was published in literary coterie magazine while he was at university. He began to read Mansfield in his high school days and read frequently while he was absent from school because of tuberculosis. It is said that her works select readers. This future authority of literary critic had truly selected appropriate writer. On 27th of December last year, I visited again this birthplace with fellow members of The Katherine Mansfield Society of Japan. In 1986 the birthplace was purchased by The Katherine Mansfield Birthplace Society and carefully restored, then was opened to the public in 1988 of centennial of her birth. Nowadays, this birthplace plays an important role as the museum of this writer and the Society continues solid operation for this institution. On the periphery of Tinakori Road, directional signs and banners for guideposts to it are set up. Mansfield News of the Society reported that travel guides of many foreign countries began to insert information about it. In Japan, I found also fairy detailed entries in some travel guides. In the evening of the day, we were invited to their home by Mrs. Oroya Day, The Founder President of the Society, and her husband Mr. Melvin N. Day, a famous painter, and had a pleasant time for their warm kiwi hospitality.
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  • Hideki Tachibana
    Type: Article
    2003 Volume 10 Pages 72-74
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    One of the words which originated in Polynesia and spread all over the world is 'tapu'. Among the Maori society which belongs to Polynesia, the word 'tapu' is used variously in the daily life aspects, namely the word has many meanings. And also the meanings of 'tapu' seem to be connected with public interest. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the meanings of 'tapu' and to find the fundamental meaning of the word, and to examine the relation between 'tapu' and public interest.
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  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 10 Pages 75-
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 10 Pages 76-
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 10 Pages 77-
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2003 Volume 10 Pages 78-
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2003 Volume 10 Pages Cover3-
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Download PDF (31K)
  • Type: Cover
    2003 Volume 10 Pages Cover4-
    Published: June 21, 2003
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Download PDF (31K)
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