The Journal of The Japan Society for New Zealand Studies
Online ISSN : 2432-2733
Print ISSN : 1883-9304
Volume 12
Showing 1-18 articles out of 18 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2005 Volume 12 Pages Cover1-
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2005 Volume 12 Pages Cover2-
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Sachiko SATO
    Type: Article
    2005 Volume 12 Pages 1-
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Naoko Sajima
    Type: Article
    2005 Volume 12 Pages 2-23
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    This monograph examines the historical evolution of the anti-terrorism policies in New Zealand and describes its formidable efforts to materialise the counter-terrorism measures. Indeed, New Zealand suggested the legislation of counter-terrorism measures, in advance of the September 11th in 2001. However, the September 11^<th> tragedy drew New Zealand people's attention to the issue and stirred up public opinions. Since then, New Zealand's government precisely had revised the Bill, which primarily set in April 2001, and the Parliament Committees had animated the debates. The Counter Terrorism Act 2002, which was deliberated in October 2003, was the revision of former six Acts, including The Terrorism Suppression Act 2002, in style. However, it was the first comprehensive legislation of various counter-terrorism activities of New Zealand. In reality, the legislation process of counter-terrorism is continuing in New Zealand and developing in 2005. New Zealand's Terrorism Act practically and credibly has boosted the government fight against terrorism. Conversely, Japan has not yet such a comprehensive legislation. Japan's counter-terrorism measures are respectively introduced by each Ministry and Agency. The contrasts between Japan and New Zealand are clear. Therefore, the assessments are comparatively made of the prospects for the possible approaches. In conclusion, not only for the internal peace but for the both regional and global goal of promoting peace and stability, the agendas and co-agendas of counter-terrorism are to be focussed.
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  • Hitoshi Kaneyama
    Type: Article
    2005 Volume 12 Pages 24-35
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    This is the sequel to the paper titled "A Feature of Maori Literature -Witi Ihimaera's Novel(1), " -which mainly aimed to investigate the literary forms and messages of The Matriarch (1986). My main interest was to make clear if there was a big difference in thought and mode between his earlier works and this novel After some inspection, I reached the conclusion that The Matriarch is imbued with Ihimaera's densely political awareness of the present situation of Maori. And also I emphasized this novel can safely be said to be an epic in mode and structure. In this paper, I tried first to examine what Ihimaera thought of the difference of history and myth (and legend). It can be argued that Ihimaera has a view that history is subsumed in a wide sense of myth. Next, I discussed Ihimaera's way of narration in The Matriarch, which is literally called 'magic realism.' He used traditional Maori myth as fantastic tool against the realistic descriptions to make corrupt colonial landscape more explicit. My final discussion dealt with the concept of 'centrality' and 'marginality' expressed in this novel from the post-colonial viewpoint. In conclusion, Witi Ihimaera, I think, can be conceived as one of the greatest writers in post-colonial times.
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  • Junko Satoh
    Type: Article
    2005 Volume 12 Pages 36-47
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    The purpose of this paper is to describe how Playcentre activities in New Zealand are modeled after Japanese child care, especially with regard to young mothers in nuclear families when they engage in child-raising. In Japan, "Shoushika" was first taken up seriously by government and media in 1989, when the Japanese total fertility rate (TFR) dropped to 1.57. This new discourse resulted in the "Angel Plan" in 1994, the government's policy to attempt to increase birthrates. In spite of the government's appeals, the problem of low fertility is becoming more serious. In my analysis, it was found out that child care services have been partial to working mothers, and that the government had provided services to non-working mothers only as one-time side events. They need to empower parents to cheerfully raise children by themselves. Playcentre activities can serve as models. In this paper, I would like to examine early childcare in Japan, using my observations of Picasso Playcentre in Kokubunji-city, Tokyo. Interviews were conducted with 3 supervisors and 4 members of the Picasso Playcentre. This research shows that Picasso Playcentre uses their philosophy of "Families growing together" to appeal to Japanese parents.
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  • Akinori Matsumoto
    Type: Article
    2005 Volume 12 Pages 48-57
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    In 1996, I observed some significant differences between the attitudes of people in Christchurch and those of people in a multicultural city, Melbourne, in Australia, where I lived for about nine years before coming to New Zealand. At that time it seemed that many Christchurch residents were unaccustomed to contact with foreigners and were strongly influenced by British culture. However, significant changes in relation to ethnic and cultural issues have occurred in the city during over the last eight years. Although the number of Asian tourists, students and migrants dropped due to 9/11 and the SARS epidemic, the figures for Asian migrants are still dramatically higher compared with those of the 1980's. In addition, refugees have come from African countries such as Somalia and Ethiopia. as well as from some Asian countries. In 1981, according to the Press, the local newspaper in Christchurch, out of every 40 residents in Christchurch, 38 were "Pakeha" (this means European New Zealanders in the Maori language), 1 person was Maori and 1 either a Pacific Islander or a Chinese or an Indian. At present 35 out of every 40 residents are "Pakeha", 3 are Maori and the remaining 2 are Asians. There are now also numerous Asian restaurants and shops, and it is possible to meet people with a variety of ethnic backgrounds in the city. However, some serious racial and ethnic conflicts between Asian migrants and local New Zealanders have occurred in this city recently. In order to solve such ethnic conflicts, on 4 May 2004 Christchurch's Mayor, Garry Moore, organised a public hearing, inviting a previous Minister of Immigration, councillors and representatives from ethnic groups in Christchurch. However, about 2000 people demonstrated against racism on 8 May 2004. Racial issues in Christchurch have now become an important matter of public interest in New Zealand, and a number of articles about these issues appeared in May, 2004. The Press also conducted a telephone survey of the opinions of 500 Christchurch residents and 300 Auckland residents in relation to racial and ethnic issues in both cities and New Zealand in general. The survey showed that Auckland residents seemed to be more accustomed to cultural diversity than those in Christchurch. On 1 June 2004 Prime Minister, Helen Clark held a community forum in Christchurch, and presented some significant policies on ethnic issues to representatives of ethnic groups in New Zealand. The New Zealand Government has now begun to make a serious effort to tackle ethnic and multicultural issues in the same way as the Australian government did in the 1980's.
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  • Tetsuro TAJIMA
    Type: Article
    2005 Volume 12 Pages 58-60
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Last year The Mansfield Kinenkan Museum opened in Fukushima Prefecture. It was built by Professor Ohsawa (President of The Katherine Mansfield Society of Japan) on his private land, and was planned to be the center of studying Katherine Mansfield(1888-1923), a famous writer of New Zealand who was introduced to Japan by Tokuboku HIRATA in 1923. We Japanese have strengthened ties between Japan and New Zealand.
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  • Chizu Hori
    Type: Article
    2005 Volume 12 Pages 61-62
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Sealord Group is the biggest fishing company in New Zealand with an annual revenue of 582.7million NZ dollars for fiscal 2004 and owns nearly 20% share of all commercial fishing quota within NZ waters. Its stocks are half owned by a Maori body (formerly a trust and now transferred to Aotearoa Fisheries) and the other half by a Japanese fishing company Nissui (from 2001). Nissui is now leading Sealord to a) increase frozen seafood export to Japan, b) develop fishing and aquaculture techniques within NZ waters, c) consolidate its international production/distribution channels with Nissui in the area where it is possible and cost-efficient. Current topics regarding Sealord are as follows : a) Tough business environment : A 50% slash in Hoki quota for fiscal 2005 added with unfavorable exchange rates, low international prices and high fuel cost. b) Merger talks with Sanford called off : It is understood that Sanford walked away after dissatisfaction over the levels of shareholdings in a merged entity. c) Introduction of Maori Fisheries Act : 50% share of Sealord stocks were handed over to Aotearoa Fisheries in accordance with the law. Under the new regulation, Maori people can now sell their fishing quota freely (with some exceptions) instead of leasing most of it to Maori fishing companies such as Sealord. As a consequence, it may be harder for Sealord to maintain its fishing quota in the future. I find Sealord a very intriguing subject regarding NZ-Japan business relationship and Waitangi Treaty settlement, so would like to keep my eyes on it over a long term.
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  • Akiko NAGAI
    Type: Article
    2005 Volume 12 Pages 63-65
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Haere Mai is Auckland's YOSAKOI SORAN dance team associated with New Zealand Japan Society of Auckland. In June 2004, the Haere Mai participated in the 13th YOSAKOI SORAN. Haere Mai members enjoyed the event and received high praise from people for their dance.
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  • Sachiko Sato
    Type: Article
    2005 Volume 12 Pages 66-68
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    In January, an official of the Foreign Ministry called me on the phone and asked me to meet the mayor of Featherstion in New Zealand where the Featherston incident happened. About fifty Japanese POWs died there during World War II. I met her with Mr. Misawa, a section chief of Oceania, and Mr. Hada, an assistant section chief of Oceania. Prime Minister Murayama created a programme called "Peaceful Exchange of Friendship" in 1995. The reason he developed the programme was so that Japanese people would not commit the same offenses in the future. The mayor of Featherston was invited through the programme. I knew about the Featherston incident when a professor at Canterbury University used "SHURIKEN" as a text for a course in drama. I was surprised to read Japanese haiku in the book. I visited Featherston and saw the haiku on the monument where the incident occurred. I met some of the persons concerned, Akiko, Mr. Adachi, Mr. Shinya, Mr. Sakurai, Mr. Mizuno. Mr. Mizuno, who is living in Hokkaido, was by the bodies of the Japanese POWs that night and was shocked to see all the bodies had disappeared the next morning. Many people are searching for the ashes. Mr. Mizuno asked me to give his regards to the mayor of Featherston. The Japanese POWs like and respect New Zealand and New Zealanders.
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  • Yoshinori Okada
    Type: Article
    2005 Volume 12 Pages 69-72
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    The purpose of this paper is to prepare my report at the study meeting under the Japan society for New Zealand Studies. My report at the meeting refers to the problems which New Zealand export sector should overcome the difficulties. At first, NZ should try to diversify the export merchandises and export countries. Not only the dairy pastoral goods but also cultivated plants, and seafood are needed in export industry in the long run. Export slump for a few merchandises are avoided by diversification. After these efforts, secondary industry of the agricultural goods is expected to grow in New Zealand. Secondly, it is important to utilize the Japanese companies, fund and technology. In the past, NZ attracted aluminium factory and timber plant from Japan. In order to develop the new industry, Australian firms and Japanese joint venture are needed as same as the aluminium case. Thirdly, from the view of depleting world resources, NZ is endowed rich resources. Japan is expecting NZ abundant resources in the future. However, NZ only cannot develop the resources. Japan and Australia prepare the capital, technology and market.
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  • Anthony SIMPSON
    Type: Article
    2005 Volume 12 Pages 73-
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2005 Volume 12 Pages 74-
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2005 Volume 12 Pages 75-
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2005 Volume 12 Pages 76-
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2005 Volume 12 Pages Cover3-
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (32K)
  • Type: Cover
    2005 Volume 12 Pages Cover4-
    Published: June 18, 2005
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (32K)
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