The Journal of The Japan Society for New Zealand Studies
Online ISSN : 2432-2733
Print ISSN : 1883-9304
Volume 8
Showing 1-13 articles out of 13 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2001 Volume 8 Pages Cover1-
    Published: June 23, 2001
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (19K)
  • Type: Cover
    2001 Volume 8 Pages Cover2-
    Published: June 23, 2001
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (19K)
  • Yasuaki TAKAHASHI
    Type: Article
    2001 Volume 8 Pages 1-2
    Published: June 23, 2001
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (187K)
  • Tetsuro Tajima
    Type: Article
    2001 Volume 8 Pages 3-11
    Published: June 23, 2001
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    3. Mansfield and Laurencin Marie Laurencin (1883-1956), French painter belonged to the same generation of Katherine Mansfield (1888-1923), has been widely loved by Japanese. In Japan (in Nagano Prefecture) there is Marie Laurencin Museum which is only one special museum of her works in the world. One of its displays is a book of short stories written by Katherine Mansfield and illustrated with 16 lithographs made by Marie Laurencin. It was the book published in 1939 and one of the 30 books with signatures of Marie Laurencin herself. Both these two excellent artists have been accepted and loved by many Japanese for more than 70 years. 4. Mansfield and Futabatei It is scarecely known even in Japan that Katherine Mansfield had introduced a Japanese novel for The Athenaeum as the reviewer of fiction in 1920. This book was An Adopted Husband (1906) by Futabatei, translated in English and published in 1919. She invoked to readers that their absurd notions to modern Japanese domesticity would be broken by this presentation and the problem stared was not unlike to one of western society. She also assured them that this novel was a very serious work of art. It seems that this review might have been written because of her continuous deep concern to things Japan and Japonisme, not because of mere exotic and journalistic interest to Japanese novel.
    Download PDF (725K)
  • Chikara R. KUBOTA
    Type: Article
    2001 Volume 8 Pages 12-18
    Published: June 23, 2001
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    As generally known, Playcentre activity is one kind (type) of the early childhood education in New Zealand. Although it looks like them in a sense, Playcentre is not a Kindergarten. At the same time, it isn't a Nursery Home (Daycare Centre). But, it is a very unique place for the young (from 30 months old) children, actually. They can enjoy the Play and the Playing in a real meaning through selecting and choosing freely their activities and toys at Playcentre. By the way, at Playcentre, they don't have any teachers nor any nurses. In a word, they don't have any professions for the children there. Who does take care of and look after the children at Playcentre? Their parents as care givers, of course. Playcentre has been established and managed by the parents themselves for over 50 years. So the parents at Playcentre have to have special meetings for learning parenting and communication for the managing Playcentre, regularly. Families growing together, it is a main philosophy of Playcentre activity in New Zealand. The parents at Playcentre always have to help each other. Recently in our Japan, we have many national plans and procedures especially for the young parents to help their nursing at their homes and families. For example, the Angel Plan in Japan since 1994 is the most famous one. Of course, it is really important for the children and they have to need those special politics. But, many of us are very afraid that the parents in a young generation don't (or won't) take care of their own children by themselves. They must not forget their own responsibilities of real parents as care givers for the children From this viewpoint (above), we (for instance, Ms. Mika IKEMOTO at Japan Research Institute and myself) think that we really need a new movement between the young parents just like a Playcentre activity in Japan. So we have been studying about Playcentre in New Zealnd and visited there many times to get the informations and the materials since 1996. At last, we started our Playcentre Movement in Japan. Fujiyama Mama Playcentre (based in Mishima City, Shizuoka prefecture) since 2000 is the first Japanese Playcentre. This report shows us how we got and established Fujiyama Mama Playcentre and some kinds of activities that we presented for the parents there. Of course, we have some problems and troubles at our Playcentre Japan version, that is to say. Anyway, from June 2001, we are planning to start 3 centers in Shizuoka pref.
    Download PDF (696K)
  • Hideki Tachibana
    Type: Article
    2001 Volume 8 Pages 19-23
    Published: June 23, 2001
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This paper concerns Teone Taare Tikao, the last narrator of Maori tradition and one of the most respected rangatira (chieftain) those days. Tikao was born in 1850 at Akaroa on the Banks peninsula, South Island. The era of his life was such that an exciting and instability were prevailing throughout New Zealand. There happened many conflicts among Maori tribes, and between Maori and pakeha (English) caused by the Waitangi Treaty ratified between Maori and United Kingdom in 1840. When Tikao was young, he had been well trained as tohunga (priest, specialist) and he became versed in Maori history, calture and society as well as many whakapapa (lineage) of major families. In the late 19th century, Tikao assumed the position of rangatira of his hapu (sub-tribe) and he was gradually concerned with politics not only in South Island but also whole Aotearoa (New Zealand). He was elected chairman of Kotahitanga (Maori Unity) and he much contributed to the protection of Maori rights and to the promotion of Maori autonomy. Tikao handed down many Maori traditions such as myths, folk tales, legends, customs and folkways. He also left the spirit of Kotahitanga for the next generations which is still active up to the present. Tikao died in 1927 and buried at Rapaki, a small town facing on the Lyttelton Harbor located on south of Christchurch.
    Download PDF (513K)
  • Tsuneo IWASAKI
    Type: Article
    2001 Volume 8 Pages 24-30
    Published: June 23, 2001
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    It was March 1st, 2000. We saw some news about ECHELON system by 5 countries (English=speaking countries)-USA, UK, Canada, Australia and New zealand. It was with a map on the paper of Mainichi Newspaper Co. (Tokyo) written by Mr. Takuya Kishimoto, London Correspondent. On the map, there was a place called "Waihopia" in New Zealand. What's ECHELON? Where's Waihopia? And then, I asked them my friends in Japan and New Zealand. But I was very sorry to say I didn't receive any answers from them. After some months. I found that it's Waihopai near Blenheim in South Island. NZ has two satellite Communications Units in Waihopai and Tangimoana. We know GCSB has an office in Wellington in "NZ Official Year Book". I think ECHELON by 5 countries is un-fair. I say Japan is un-fair, too. We can read a book published in New zealand in 1996. "Secret Powers : New zealand's Role in the International Spy Network" by Nicky Hager. I think the book tells us a lot of informations about ECHELON in New Zealand.
    Download PDF (758K)
  • Masumi Muramatsu
    Type: Article
    2001 Volume 8 Pages 31-39
    Published: June 23, 2001
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    "Kiwis" here is a term of endearment referring to the New Zealanders, used with their concurrence and generally in their presence. A small country, no doubt. A two-frigate flotilla of the NZ Navy made a friendly port call in Tokyo nearly ten years ago. I took some of my former students who had visited NZ with me. I asked the captain of a frigate about the size of his navy, and his answer was this was it. "Is this enough to defend your country?" was my question, to which he replied, tongue in cheek, " Nobody would bother us." I like the Nzers' readiness to laugh at themselves. More than a couple of decades ago when Mr. Oyamada Takashi was appointed Japan's ambassador to NZ, he delighted the people assembled to farewell him by the following joke : Japan and NZ are quite similar in terms of the countries' shapes, land area, four seasons, coastlines, volcanoes, hotsprings, etc. Differences are the population : 126 million Japanese (thebn) and only a little over 3 million in NZ. But while NZ has more than 150 milion sheep, in Japan you can finish counting all the sheep before you become sleepy. Which joke I later improved by adding my own second punchline : As a matter of fact, in the highly congested and competitive society like Japan, you may even see some red-eyed sheep at the railroad station early in the morning try to count the comnmuters. The indigeneous residents of the Land of Long White Cloud, the Maoris, are well integrated into the society, having produced some outstanding civic and political leaders. One of the charming Maori customs maintained has been known by the misnomer "rubbing the nose." I learned the right way of Maori greeting from none other than the Queen of the Maoris who visited Japan some years ago. You hold each other's palms, put your foreheads and then your noses together lightly, close your eyes, and think about each othyer. You might say that I learned this from the royal horse's mouth. Another well-known flightless bird native to NZ Moa, had been hunted by the Maoris and became extinct two centuries ago. Having bought a cute little booklet at an NZ museum entitled NO MOA, written for young people, I kept repeating No moa, No moa, and soon came up with a rather primitive limerick A Maori from old Rotorua Came to Auckland to hunt up some moa. The museum retains Only the skeletal remains. Cried the Maori, 'Alas, there's no moa!' Unlike their siblings across the Tasman Sea, the Kiwis' ancestors were not convicts. They pride themselves of the fact their forebears came there on their own. To this their sibling rivals would immediately retort that theirs had been chosen by His Majesty's Court. What may sound like mutual insulting to the third parties is in fact friendly bantering, enjoyed by these two peoples to confirm their friendship. The Penguin books of Australian jokes, more Australian jokes, and NZ jokes are full of such bantering jokes. The butts of the jokes can be either of them. I also like the way the Kiwis are capable of laughing at themselves, in self-deprecating jokes, the best type of jokes to me. To quote just one example : Did you hear about the New Zealand businessman who was glad he was not born in Japan because he couldn't speak Japanese. By the time this unscholarly, irrelevant essay is printed, I will have finished a two-week lecture tour of NZ as a guest of the English-Speaking Union of NZ in collaboration with the English-Speaking Union of Japan. My Aussie friends, having found out about this, quickly tell to be sure to teach the Kiwis how to speak English properly. Everyone in the world has his/her own national, regional accent. I enjoy listening to the different Englishes, and to those bantering jokes exchanged between various peoples.
    Download PDF (591K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2001 Volume 8 Pages 40-
    Published: June 23, 2001
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (40K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2001 Volume 8 Pages 41-
    Published: June 23, 2001
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (56K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2001 Volume 8 Pages 42-
    Published: June 23, 2001
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (10K)
  • Type: Cover
    2001 Volume 8 Pages Cover3-
    Published: June 23, 2001
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (16K)
  • Type: Cover
    2001 Volume 8 Pages Cover4-
    Published: June 23, 2001
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (16K)
feedback
Top