The Journal of The Japan Society for New Zealand Studies
Online ISSN : 2432-2733
Print ISSN : 1883-9304
Volume 16
Showing 1-16 articles out of 16 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2009 Volume 16 Pages Cover1-
    Published: June 20, 2009
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Index
    2009 Volume 16 Pages Toc1-
    Published: June 20, 2009
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Yutai WATANABE
    Type: Article
    2009 Volume 16 Pages 1-2
    Published: June 20, 2009
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Hitoshi Kaneyama
    Type: Article
    2009 Volume 16 Pages 3-16
    Published: June 20, 2009
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Witi Ihimaera's first novel, Tangi (1973), is the expanded version of the short story with the same title in Pounamu Pounamu (1972). Originally, this story was published first in Te Maori, and later was included in Contemporary Maori Writing, with a few alterations under the help of Margaret Orbell, its editor. The novel recounts the reaction of its protagonist, Tama Mahana, to the death of his father and his reawakening to traditional Maori values through tangi (funeral), one of the most important rituals in the Maori community. Tama has moved from Waituhi (which is called his 'home'), near Gisborne, to Wellington to work - many other young Maori have drifted away from their own land. He gets into a panic at the sudden death of his father and in confusion takes a plane to join the people of his whanau (extended family) in the tangi. His experiences at the ritual seem to inspire him to maturity and self-knowledge in various ways. Tama finally decides to get back home to take care of his family at his mother's earnest request and also at his late father's wish. The novel begins with the scene at Gisborne Station where Tama is waiting for the train for Wellington. He is thinking of going back to the city first, and then returning to stay at Waituhi finally. During the journey to Wellington, Tama is reminded of the past, occasioned by what he sees or hears inside or outside the train. This novel builds around sequences of Tama's memories and impressions underlying in his internal con-ciousness. The sequences are not chronological; the concept of time in Tangi is not so much evolutionary as reversible or regressive. In addition to the problem of time, it is worthy of note that Maori myth has much to do with the form and motive of this novel. That is because Tama tends to identify his own time with the timeless world of myths, despite that he cannot deny the insistent presence of death. In Tangi Ihimaera often quotes mythic episodes from Maori myth, particularly linking his parents with the creation myth, to try to present a striking contrast to the modern concept of time. The pastoral life Ihimaera depicts also makes a significant contrast with modern city life in terms of time. This paper aims to investigate into perspective of time and space represented in Tangi, 'the first novel written by a Maori to be published.' It can be safely believed that this kind of approach to Tangi will be of some use in the appreciation of this work.
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  • Manabu OHNISHI
    Type: Article
    2009 Volume 16 Pages 17-26
    Published: June 20, 2009
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    This paper aims to illustrate a basic framework for classifying Fishing Patterns under the New Zealand's Individual Transferable Quotas System. This helps to explore further understanding of importance of Quota Owners and economic value for Fishing Patterns. The definition of "Fishing Patterns" is in this paper operationally subdivided; Catch Limited, Catches and Trading of Fishing Quota and Annual Catch Entitlement (ACE), which are based on the actual record of 2007 fishing Year. This paper provides following major findings. 1. There are three major Fishing Patterns without stocks classifying anywhere. 2. Fishing Pattern 1: This fishing pattern is explained that all fishing activities are intended for speculative, investment and risk hedge trading. 3. Fishing Pattern 2: This fishing pattern means almost catches are ACE trading which includes 62 stocks and account for 15% of all stocks. 4. Fishing Pattern 3: This fishing pattern shows that there are no actual fishing activities, catches, fishing trading and ACE trading completely. This pattern mostly belonged to the area 10 "KERMADEC".
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  • Junko Satoh
    Type: Article
    2009 Volume 16 Pages 27-40
    Published: June 20, 2009
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    In the New Zealand society, most of mother had followed the British child-rearing tradition such as "mother should take care of her child at home" for many years. The idea had become the mainstream child-rearing method in New Zealand over the period 1940-1980. This paper refers to Playcentre in New Zealand. The characteristics of Playcentre are the mutual child-rearing support system and adult learning courses for parents. It started in wartime, and the early 1970s was the heyday for the Playcentre campaign. The purpose of this paper is to explore their motivations to get involved with Playcentre activities in the late 1960s and 1970s. Also, the research examined the motherhood ideology and outsourcing child-care interfaces in the lives of postwar New Zealand women.
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  • Teruo HATATO
    Type: Article
    2009 Volume 16 Pages 41-42
    Published: June 20, 2009
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Takamichi OKABE
    Type: Article
    2009 Volume 16 Pages 43-46
    Published: June 20, 2009
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Ian KENNEDY
    Type: Article
    2009 Volume 16 Pages 47-53
    Published: June 20, 2009
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2009 Volume 16 Pages 54-56
    Published: June 20, 2009
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2009 Volume 16 Pages 57-
    Published: June 20, 2009
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2009 Volume 16 Pages 58-60
    Published: June 20, 2009
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2009 Volume 16 Pages 61-62
    Published: June 20, 2009
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2009 Volume 16 Pages App1-
    Published: June 20, 2009
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2009 Volume 16 Pages Cover2-
    Published: June 20, 2009
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Download PDF (38K)
  • Type: Cover
    2009 Volume 16 Pages Cover3-
    Published: June 20, 2009
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Download PDF (38K)
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