The Journal of The Japan Society for New Zealand Studies
Online ISSN : 2432-2733
Print ISSN : 1883-9304
Volume 9
Showing 1-16 articles out of 16 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2002 Volume 9 Pages Cover1-
    Published: June 22, 2002
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2002 Volume 9 Pages Cover2-
    Published: June 22, 2002
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Yoshinori OKADA
    Type: Article
    2002 Volume 9 Pages 1-
    Published: June 22, 2002
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • McNeil Ken
    Type: Article
    2002 Volume 9 Pages 2-11
    Published: June 22, 2002
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Tetsuro Tajima
    Type: Article
    2002 Volume 9 Pages 12-15
    Published: June 22, 2002
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    V Yone Noguchi's English poems and Mansfield The biographer explored that Katherine Mansfield (1888-1923) had read English poems of a Japanese poet in 1910. That was Yonejiro Noguchi (1857-1947), whose pen name was Yone Noguchi. It seems that his son Isamu Noguchi, talented sculptor, is more famous than he nowadays. He went to America at 19, and after finding favor with Joaquin Miller, the American poet, he began to write English poems. In 1903 he published his third book of poems, From the Eastern Sea, in London, which was acclaimed by Thomas Hardy, Arthur Symons and other authorities on English literature. In 1909 he also published his masterpiece, The Pilgrimage, in London. Mansfield might have read either of these books. His poems were commented like as poems of French symbolist. The part of the first poem of the book Seen and Unseen (1896) is as follows : The fate-colored leaves float dumbly down unto the groundbreast, thousands after thousands, mutting the earth with yellow flakes, Whilst the brushing of a golden, Autumn wind dreams away into the immoral stillness. Ah, they roam down, roam down, roam down. It reminds Japanese readers of that sympathetic phrase found in Journal of Katherine Mansfield : In the autumn garden leaves falling. Little footfalls, like gentle whispering. They fly, spin, twirl, shake. (October 18, 1922)
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  • Chikara R. KUBOTA
    Type: Article
    2002 Volume 9 Pages 16-21
    Published: June 22, 2002
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    This paper shows one kind of viewpoints of research (the newest one) concerned with Playcentre and Kohanga Reo as the early childhood services in New Zealand.
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  • Hideki Tachibana
    Type: Article
    2002 Volume 9 Pages 22-24
    Published: June 22, 2002
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    There are many Maori words used in New Zealand poems written by either pakeha or Maori. The purpose of this article is to introduce some Maori words appeared in Summer Wedding written by Albert Wendt and to express my thoughts about the Maori words concerned. Wendt is a South Pacific writer with an international reputation educated in New Zealand. He was born in Western Samoa in 1939. At the age of 13, he went to New Zealand and attended New Plymouth Boy's high school, Victoria university, graduating with an MA in history. Wendt returned Western Samoa to teach in 1965 and served as a professor or educational staff before taking up a chair in English at the University of Auckland. Although his works deals mainly with Samoan life, it also relates to universal concerns. His novels include Sons for the Return Home, Leaves of the Bayan Tree, which won the Wattie Book of the Year Award, and 01a, Inside us the Dead and Photographs are collections of poetry. I selected Summer Wedding this time.
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  • Kenshiro Takeuchi
    Type: Article
    2002 Volume 9 Pages 25-28
    Published: June 22, 2002
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Most of the countries I visited are in the Northern hemisphere. Therefore, I was very interested in going south of the equator to New Zealand. Why not Australia, some might ask. One of the reasons why I chose NZ was that I knew less about that country than about Australia. Most Japanese know less about NZ than they do about Australia. Secondly, the English we learn at school in Japan is mostly American English. I remember the first time I went to England, I couldn't understand what my taxi driver was saying. This kind of English experience was what I expected before I left for NZ. The time difference between Japan and NZ is only three hours, so we don't suffer much from jet lag. I flew to Christchurch, which I found very much like Britain as is often said. I learned that NZ is called "Aotearoa" in Maori language, which means "the land of long white clouds." Actually I saw long white clouds high up against the clear blue sky. It was a windy day. English and Maori are the two official languages there, but it was not until 1987 that Maori became the other official language. Actually, English is the everyday language with some Maori words incorporated and used as English. It was interesting to know that "Maori" means "usual" or "ordinary, " whereas New Zealanders whose ancestors came from Europe are called "Pakeha, " which means "strangers"(from the sea). NZ is the first country in the world where women won the right to vote. This, I think, symbolizes that people are well taken care of. I saw a bus with a sign that said "This bus kneels on request." The step lowers itself to make it easier for a wheelchaired person to get on. Traffic signals are also made for people with some visual impairment. The part around the button on the signal pole vibrates to tell him or her when it's safe to go. In a car park (a parking lot in American English), I saw "Reserved Parking" marked on the ground. This area is reserved for those who use a wheelchair.
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  • Hikaru Deura
    Type: Article
    2002 Volume 9 Pages 29-31
    Published: June 22, 2002
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Although I have often had the question "Why do you like New Zealand so much?" I can't an answer. Because it's a kind of a feeling for me. However, I have some idea. One of the reasons is beer. I like to drink beer not only Japanese one but also foreign countries one. I think New Zealand's beer is as good as Japanese beer. It's taste good. But New Zealand beer is not popular in Japan because it's easy for us to get European, USA, and Asian countries beer. At the same point, Australian (in spite of New Zealand neighbor country) is also easy to get in Japan. We can only find one sort of New Zealand beer that is Stainlagar. In my research, I have often found requests on the internet from Japanese people who have traveled to New Zealand who are looking for New Zealand beer except of Stainlagar. In this time, I choused Speight's beer which is my favorite and has comparatively lots of requests from Japanese travelers on the internet. You can find the detail information of Speight's beer on the internet site which is tours@speight's.co.nz. I tried to get Speight's beers. However, I couldn't get its because tour officer said that Speight's isn't sold to foreign countries. It was disappointed result for me. So, I am looking for drinking New Zealand's beer when I visit. What about drinking New Zealand's beer when you visit? Although I am not tourist agency, I recommend New Zealand beer.
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  • Chizu Hori
    Type: Article
    2002 Volume 9 Pages 32-33
    Published: June 22, 2002
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    I would like to introduce a couple of movies directed by New Zealanders that have been shown recently in Japan. One is The Lord of the Rings, directed by Peter Jackson. This huge-scale(trilogy) movie was made possible by the strong support of NZ, with its beautiful scenery, digital effects workshop, and even an army. I feel glad about NZ movie industry booming as a result of this movie's success, but personally hope NZ wouldn't become too much like Hollywood, where everything seems so artificial. The other is The Price of Milk, directed by Harry Sinclair. This cute movie about love depicts ordinary life of NZ with a sprinkle of magic. It seems the movie is popular among independent movie-goers, especially women in their 20s and 30s.
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  • Tsuneo IWASAKI
    Type: Article
    2002 Volume 9 Pages 34-37
    Published: June 22, 2002
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2002 Volume 9 Pages 38-
    Published: June 22, 2002
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2002 Volume 9 Pages 39-
    Published: June 22, 2002
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2002 Volume 9 Pages 40-
    Published: June 22, 2002
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2002 Volume 9 Pages Cover3-
    Published: June 22, 2002
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2002 Volume 9 Pages Cover4-
    Published: June 22, 2002
    Released: April 15, 2017
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