The Journal of The Japan Society for New Zealand Studies
Online ISSN : 2432-2733
Print ISSN : 1883-9304
Volume 15
Showing 1-17 articles out of 17 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2008 Volume 15 Pages Cover1-
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Index
    2008 Volume 15 Pages 1-
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Michio YAMAOKA
    Type: Article
    2008 Volume 15 Pages 2-3
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Michio Yamaoka
    Type: Article
    2008 Volume 15 Pages 4-25
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    The research group of Economic Education in the Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies at Waseda University translated the Test of Understanding of College Economics (TUCE, Fourth Edition; TUCE-4) into Japanese, and administered the test in Japan to determine the present status and problems of economics literacy among Japanese college students. TUCE was originally developed by Professor William Walstad (University of Nebraska), Professor Michael Watts (Purdue University), and Associate Professor Ken Rebeck (Saint Clouds University). In New Zealand it was also administered by Dr. Steven Lim at the University of Waikata to his college students taking macroeconomics and microeconomics as post-test. The original test contains 30 questions in a multiple-choice format, but Dr Lim deleted 5 questions from macroeconomics and 2 questions from microeconomics as unsuitable for his students. In New Zealand 63 students took macroeconomics test and 71 students microeconomics test. The Japanese research group administered the TUCE-4 to 448 Japanese college students (6 universities) as field-test in the 2006 spring semester. From the test results, both Japanese students and New Zealand students appear to have an incomplete knowledge of the economic terms, concepts and principles found in college economic courses, and the questions on the micro and the macro TUCE-4 seemed quite difficult for them. To improve their economics literacy, economics education at the high school level, as well as at the university/college level, should be scrutinized carefully and strengthened.
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  • Toshiyuki MURAKAMI
    Type: Article
    2008 Volume 15 Pages 26-36
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    The purpose of this paper is to explain how small and medium sized food business companies of New Zealand can expand into Japanese food market, following some big food business companies of New Zealand. The methods of the analysis are in two ways, one is a quantified trade analysis of food and beverages between Japan and New Zealand, and the other is a SWOT analysis that is based on the detailed interviews for 15 food business companies. The targets of the analysis are New Zealand food business companies that have branches in Japan. I focus on the competitive superiority and the marketing strategy of the companies. The results of the analyses are that the big companies' competitive superiorities are their monopoly power and pricing power. But they consider there is little merit to compete with Chinese cheap products, it is better to prevent the price battle. On the other hand, small and medium sized food business companies' amount of sales are very small, so they emphasis on the commodity character to enhance their competitive superiorities. And about marketing strategy, there is not so much of a difference between big companies and small companies. The key success factors are the strategy of increasing the added value, brand power, stable supply, not selling bargain, usage of NZ's "Clean and Green" image, taking patent, and matching marketing needs "health trend". And I find that promising new channels of sales are upscale supermarket stores. The conclusion is that small and medium sized food business companies can hold further business expansion in Japanese food market.
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  • Lee Jisoo, Kiyohide Higuchi
    Type: Article
    2008 Volume 15 Pages 37-55
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Amid a conversion of our economies into borderless society that represents to globalization and IT revolution, competitive industries or corporations in the world are increasingly concentrated in specific regions or cities such as Silicon Valley and Amelia- Romanizoo renowned as the third Italia. From a corporate perspective, the strategies of clustering, especially among small and medium-sized companies attract a lot of attention these days as they are based on the assumption that it is easier and more efficient for them to utilize locally available management resources and capabilities by bringing in know-how or knowledge from outside than to establish it internally. As the world economy enters into an epoch of knowledge-based economic system with much emphasis on innovation, clustering is recognized as an effective means to enhance regional and industrial competitiveness. On the other hand, some scholars such as Mckelvey are casting a doubt on the advantages of clustering as an effective way to elevate the competitiveness of a particular region and/or industry. In particular, they maintain that a geographical proximity toward supplementary knowledge and capability is not always appropriate or optimal for the growth of all small and medium-sized companies that have experienced innovation. The concrete example of their doubt is New Zealand, which have grown and obtained success in (almost) all industries on a global scale without resorting to their regional resources or capabilities. What is implied in this observation is that a geographical proximity is not necessarily an effective factor to develop a regional industry that leads to gaining regional superiority while at the same time a clustering policy aimed at supporting the growth of a regional industry is not always appropriate for all cases. If a geographical proximity is not the essential factor to drive the growth of small and medium-sized companies, what other factor might there be then? Based on this question, this paper compares New Zealand with Korea from the perspective of previous researches on clustering theory. Characteristics of industry deployment of New Zealand and Korea are presented along with the comparison and analysis of clusters of both countries in terms of performance, based on two previous researches as described below. The first one is the research conducted by Jon-in Choi on how Daedeok Research Complex, the first-oHts-kind cluster in Korea, has developed as a revolutionary role model. The next one is the research done by Sally Davenport that has clearly presented what has been the driving factor to promote the growth and development of an industry cluster in New Zealand with negative view on the superiority of clustering. Based on these earlier researches, I have presented what roles should be accomplished in order for small and medium-sized companies to firmly establish an industry cluster for regional advantage as opposed to other competing regions and what is needed to provide the region with a driving force for its growth and also to lead it to an economic development and prosperity.
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  • Tatsuo Saitoh
    Type: Article
    2008 Volume 15 Pages 56-69
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Kenshiro TAKEUCHI
    Type: Article
    2008 Volume 15 Pages 70-73
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    This is a "glossary" of Kiwi-English for Japanese students of English. It is intended to give them a rough idea of how English is used in other parts of the world. They may find it a little different from the English they learn at school. The differences are mostly in vocabulary, which reflects the life of the people who live there. It is hoped that this article will help students develop an interest in different cultures as well as English. Some of the words included are: Boxing Day, conservatory, dairy, apartment, flat, B&B, brekkie, backpackers, toilet, loo, bush walk, tramping, Kia Ora, etc.
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  • Toshiko HARADA
    Type: Article
    2008 Volume 15 Pages 74-76
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Yuichi MARUMO
    Type: Article
    2008 Volume 15 Pages 77-97
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2008 Volume 15 Pages 98-99
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2008 Volume 15 Pages 100-
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2008 Volume 15 Pages 101-102
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2008 Volume 15 Pages 103-104
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2008 Volume 15 Pages App1-
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2008 Volume 15 Pages Cover2-
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2008 Volume 15 Pages Cover3-
    Published: June 21, 2008
    Released: April 15, 2017
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