The Journal of The Japan Society for New Zealand Studies
Online ISSN : 2432-2733
Print ISSN : 1883-9304
Volume 7
Showing 1-12 articles out of 12 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2000 Volume 7 Pages Cover1-
    Published: June 17, 2000
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (15K)
  • Type: Cover
    2000 Volume 7 Pages Cover2-
    Published: June 17, 2000
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (15K)
  • Tatsuo Saitou
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 7 Pages 1-
    Published: June 17, 2000
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (129K)
  • Naoko Sajima
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 7 Pages 2-21
    Published: June 17, 2000
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This is a case study of the legislation of anti-nuclear policy in order to outline the merits and demerits of it offset each other. First, the paper describes the evolutions of New Zealand's initiatives towards the establishment of international legal-framework for the nuclear-free world. The history shows that New Zealand's anti-nuclear policy has started from the real fear for the nuclear weapons testing in the South Pacific, and converged to the ideal policy which was reflected its national identity. Second, the paper surveys the process of legislation, which originated from the policy of New Zealand Labour Party in 1984 and concluded at the New Zealand Nuclear Free Zones, Disarmament, and Arms Control Act 1987. Over-viewing it, the climax at the international stage, which is called 'the ANZUS Crisis' between New Zealand and the U.S., is boldly examined. Third, the various arguments over the New Zealand Nuclear Free Zones, Disarmament, and Arms Control Act 1987 are critically introduced. In conclusion, the implication for Japan is pursued. The lessons through the New Zealand's case are underlined.
    Download PDF (1953K)
  • Mitsushi Sugihara
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 7 Pages 22-35
    Published: June 17, 2000
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    At present, there truly different opinions exist on whether or not permanent residents are members of the country where they reside and, if so, to what degree. In Japan, whether the right to vote should be granted to permanent residents has in recent years been one of the key constitutional issues and more and more commentators think that permanent residents are eligible to vote, at least at the local election. However, as far as the national election is concerned, the majority of the commentators still deny the right to vote of permanent residents on the grounds that sovereign power resides in the people. By contrast, permanent residents of New Zealand have been qualified to vote not only at the local but also at the national election since 1975, if they have resided continuously in New Zealand at least for a period of one year and in the electoral district at least for a period of one month. In the meantime, New Zealand government celebrated the 50th anniversary of the emergence of the concept of 'New Zealand citizenship' in 1998 and emphasize that a measure of a nation's maturity is the strength and depth of the country's national identity and that one of the most important aspects of their national identity is the nation of New Zealand citizenship. This paper examines why New Zealand grants the right to vote to permanent residents without citizenship even at the national election. The author concludes that whether permanent residents should be qualified to vote depends on their resolution to reside permanently in the country and have deep commitments to the future of the community. If they do have the above resolution, the level of election, national or local, is irrelevant. New Zealand's experience shows us the truth.
    Download PDF (1124K)
  • Tetsuro Tajima
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 7 Pages 36-48
    Published: June 17, 2000
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    I have written these pieces to remain memorandums for what I thought and reseached about Katherine Mansfield (1888-1923), an author of short stories born in New Zealand, since I started to read her works as a Japanese reader and held many questions or sympathy to her. I named them miscellanies because they are not literary studies nor essays. Here I have collected pieces relating to Japan to some extent. 1. Mansfield and Sei Shonagon Among many Japanese readers of Katherine Mansfield there would be persons who feel like me that she had something in common with Sei Shonagon, female essayist of Japan, lived 10th century and wrote Pillow Book. It seems very queer that one can find similality between two women who lived far apart in time and place. But we can find certainly the same sharp sensibility, brilliant wit and love to the nature between these two writers. For example, Katherine Mansfield wanted to be always crystal clear when she was writing stories and Sei Shonagon had a liking for clearness of crystal and ice. 2. Swallows like Japanese thoughts In her first book of short stories, In a German Pension (1911), Katherine Mansfield wrote a conversation scene in Modern Soul where she described swallows like a little floak of Japanese thoughts. Were there any books about Japanese thoughts, especially written in English by Japanese authors in these days this work was created? Research on this subject brings us a few works being considered as adequate. Katherine Mansfield had read these few books until she wrote this story.
    Download PDF (962K)
  • Chizu Hori
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 7 Pages 49-58
    Published: June 17, 2000
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    My friend and I travelled through the Northern Island of New Zealand on March 15-20, 2000. We first flew from Auckland to Wellington, and drove back to Auckland via tour coach named "Northern Greenliner", which is specially designated for Japanese tourists and recommended by New Zealand Tourism Board. I would like to write a little about my trip to share the joy of travelling in New Zealand with all the readers. In Wellington, on March 16, we got on the cable car and then walked to the Parliament buildings, where we took a guided tour. In the evening, we went to Te Papa Museum. On the next day, Niihara-san (guide) and Mrs. Judy Darcy (driver) picked us up onto the tour coach. Three other tourists travelling with us were brothers from Kanazawa and their grandmother. The itinerary for the 3 days were as follows : =March 17= ・Cross Hill Gardens...a walk around the garden followed by lunch.・Mangatarata Farm...close encounter with cattles and sheep, an afternoon tea ・Mission Estate Winery...tasting of prize-winning wines ・Orchard stay at Mr.& Mrs. Harington's...horseriding, apple-picking, a look inside the picking house, etc. Lots of conversation throughout dinner. =March 18= ・Art Deco walk...a quick walk through Napier's main street・Jetboating in Taupo...got all wet from several spins before reaching the Huka Falls ・Wai-O-Tapu...amazing view of Champagne pool and other thermal activities ・Luge in Roturua...enjoyed schenic view along the way ・Polynesian Spa...nice bathe under the moon =March 19= ・Hamlarna Gardens...a garden with beautiful river flow and tall redwoods ・Waitomo Caves...mystic view of shining glowworms ・Mt. Eden...360 degrees view of Auckland ・Sky Tower...night view of Auckland from state-of-the-art building
    Download PDF (773K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 7 Pages 59-
    Published: June 17, 2000
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (43K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 7 Pages 60-
    Published: June 17, 2000
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (28K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 7 Pages 60-
    Published: June 17, 2000
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (28K)
  • Type: Cover
    2000 Volume 7 Pages Cover3-
    Published: June 17, 2000
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (21K)
  • Type: Cover
    2000 Volume 7 Pages Cover4-
    Published: June 17, 2000
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (21K)
feedback
Top