The Journal of The Japan Society for New Zealand Studies
Online ISSN : 2432-2733
Print ISSN : 1883-9304
Volume 17
Showing 1-16 articles out of 16 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2010 Volume 17 Pages Cover1-
    Published: June 19, 2010
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Index
    2010 Volume 17 Pages Toc1-
    Published: June 19, 2010
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Shunji YAMAZAKI
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 17 Pages 1-
    Published: June 19, 2010
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Toshiharu Sugihara
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 17 Pages 2-12
    Published: June 19, 2010
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In New Zealand ethnic diversity has become conspicuous especially among Maori people because of the intermarriage and urbanization. Though some proposals by Statistics NZ have been made to deal with the complexity of the ethnic data in the Population Census, a good method has not yet been developed. Meanwhile, innovative Maori definitions have been made by young Maori researchers in relation to the two Maori populations in the Census; ethnic Maori and ancestry Maori. Tahu Kukutai has verified that Maori ethnic group is not uniform and multi-ethnicity can be simplified by a self-prioritization through a large survey of Maori women or Maori youths. She asserted that any definition of Maori should contain both self-identified ethnicity and descent. Another young Maori researcher, Natalie Coats, argues that ethnicity should be taken into account in the legal definition of Maori where having a Maori ancestry has been prerequisite. The idea contradicts not only the legal definition but the traditional concept of Maori (whakapapa). As well as these innovative definitions of being Maori, Maori society should be substantiated ethnically which could be attained through tikanga Maori in a daily life in order to make the best use of the ethnic data for the welfare of Maori.
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  • Nobuaki Suyama
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 17 Pages 13-22
    Published: June 19, 2010
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    This paper discusses the historical evolution of the New Zealand parliamentary system from the mid-19^<th> century to the present time. The leading expert in the area of comparative politics, Arend Lihphart, suggests us that there are two models of democracy: majoritarian and consensus. New Zealand initially looked more like the latter in due to its idyllic political landscape. Then, over a period of time, power was increasingly concentrated in the hands of the few men in the central institutions, embodied by the prime minister and the cabinet. New Zealand has had no written constitution which needs a special requirement to be amended. The first-past-the-post electoral system eventually fortified the stable two-party system, in which either Labour or National wins majority seats in its unicameral Parliament. However, it seems that New Zealand is now moving towards the consensus model, in which grave decisions are made by a greater number of players through negotiations and compromises. This is partly due to the introduction of MMP (mixed member proportional) representation in the mid-90s. Neither of the old-line political parties can come to enjoy the majority in Parliament without the assistance of some minor parties. The 1990 Bill of Rights has indeed brought some significant change to the style of politics in New Zealand. A sheer majority viewpoint is subject to the judiciary's legally profound interpretation. Having long been a docile organisation for the government, the Reserve Bank of New Zealand was given a free rein in conduction its duties such as control of the volume of currency (NZ $) and providing stability in general levels of prices in 1989.
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  • Akinori Matsumoto
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 17 Pages 23-29
    Published: June 19, 2010
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    This paper presents the current situation of native Japanese speakers teaching Japanese in New Zealand high schools through my own teaching experience, and from data of the chronological changes in the number of students who are learning Japanese and other languages at New Zealand high schools. According to the organization Education Counts, the number of students who are learning Japanese has declined almost every year between 2004 and 2009. The total number of those learning Japanese in 2009 was almost 80% of those in 2004 although the 2009 figure shows that Japanese is still the second most popular foreign language among high school students in New Zealand. On the contrary, the number studying Spanish and Chinese has increased dramatically, and doubled in the same period. That for Chinese is still very small, but that for Spanish could become larger than for Japanese in the near future if Spanish grows at a constant rate. These facts seem to reflect the Japanese economic recession and the strengthening of the economic relationship between New Zealand and China, and between New Zealand and South American countries. But we need to research this issue more deeply to verify the data. Due to the above situation, the number of schools offering Japanese courses has been declining and at the same time the positions for teaching Japanese have also been decreasing gradually. Many full time positions have become part time ones, and the latter are disappearing. Therefore, teachers of Japanese are now facing difficulties in obtaining positions in New Zealand. Despite the above situation, there are still some Japanese language teachers who can maintain their students' numbers, and even some who have been able to increase the number. My observation is that they are utilizing very innovative and inspiring teaching methods in their classes such as computer assisted learning programmes, stimulating group work and so on. It should be very valuable to research those teachers' teaching methods to clarify how they have been motivating their students. As a result of the current situation, many Japanese language teachers need to teach not only Japanese language, but also other subjects. To teach subjects other than Japanese in English can be very challenging for Japanese trained native speakers, especially because of the difficulties of classroom management in those other subjects. At tertiary institutions for teacher training in New Zealand, students receive very thorough training in classroom management techniques, as well as about how to teach more than two subjects. Therefore, I believe that native Japanese speakers who are willing to teach Japanese at any high school in New Zealand need to have teacher training at a tertiary institution in New Zealand before they actually undertake work at schools.
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  • Tetsuya Endo
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 17 Pages 30-39
    Published: June 19, 2010
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    1. No direct military threats exist against New Zealand. (Geo-politically, New Zealand is the most favored nation in the world) 2. New Zealand has great interests in the peace and stability of the South Pacific Countries. 3. New Zealand maintains very dose defense relations with Australia. 4. New Zealand has been developing close relations with Asia. 5. New Zealand, as a constructive member of the international community, actively participates in the multilateral peace-keeping and peace-building activities. 6. New Zealand keeps an unique non-nuclear policy. (Defense relations between New Zealand and the U.S.A. under ANZUS have been suspended, but the bilateral relations between the two countries have been improved.)
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  • Eiji Yamamoto
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 17 Pages 40-47
    Published: June 19, 2010
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    The theme of this paper is to examine the situation of Human Rights in New Zealand using the documents which submitted by New Zealand Government and some organizations for the Universal Periodic Review by the United Nations. Especially, the document called "Shadow Reports" by New Zealand Law Society Human Rights Committee (NZLSHRC) is strong effect on the government's policies and its domestic legislation. These issues are covered very broadly. especially on the constitutional matters, such as the role of the NZ Bill of Rights Act. Treaty of Waitangi and Immigration Bill 2007. The paper will introduce the history of human rights in New Zealand and explore the sources and scope of New Zealand's international human rights obligations. particularly in relation to the history of her constitution.
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  • Michio YAMAOKA
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 17 Pages 48-52
    Published: June 19, 2010
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2010 Volume 17 Pages 53-54
    Published: June 19, 2010
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2010 Volume 17 Pages 55-
    Published: June 19, 2010
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2010 Volume 17 Pages 56-58
    Published: June 19, 2010
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2010 Volume 17 Pages 59-60
    Published: June 19, 2010
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2010 Volume 17 Pages App1-
    Published: June 19, 2010
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2010 Volume 17 Pages Cover2-
    Published: June 19, 2010
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Type: Cover
    2010 Volume 17 Pages Cover3-
    Published: June 19, 2010
    Released: April 15, 2017
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