The Journal of the Geological Society of Japan
Online ISSN : 1349-9963
Print ISSN : 0016-7630
ISSN-L : 0016-7630
Volume 57 , Issue 666
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from the selected issue
  • Nobuo Kurata
    1951 Volume 57 Issue 666 Pages 79-86
    Published: March 28, 1951
    Released: April 11, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In the vicinity of the city of Mishima, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan, there is along lava flow (Mishima lava flow) which issued from the southeastern side of Fuji Volcano., From this lava flow, clear water amounting to 330, 000 gallons per minute gushes out forming numerous springs., Since 1948, the writer has examined the underground river supposed to lie upslope from these springs, for the purpose of investigating water sources for the irrigation of rice fields., This underground river is called the Ko-Mishimagawa (Old River of Mishima) by the writer., It flows principally in a tuffaceous formation of Hakone Volcano situated to the northeast and eventually fills up two cavernous zones in the Mishima lava flow where the latter meets the tuffaceous formation of Hakone., At 300 localities, the thickness of the lave flow and the topography of the river-bed were determined by the Wenner method of electric prospecting, based on the fact that the resistivity of the lave is high, while that of the tuff is low., The location of the river-bed and the presence of underground water in the lave flow thus supposed were secured by three boreholes.,
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  • Kiyosi KOIKE
    1951 Volume 57 Issue 666 Pages 87-93
    Published: March 28, 1951
    Released: April 11, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Tatsuro Matsumoto
    1951 Volume 57 Issue 666 Pages 95-98
    Published: March 28, 1951
    Released: April 11, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Bearing in mind the rule of the stratigraphical nomenclature, which is now under discussion among the Japanese geologists, I am going to propose the new name of the Japanese Cretaceous formations., What have been called the Lower Ammonite Beds or group, the Middle Ammonite group, the Trigonia Sandstone and the Upper Ammonite group in Hokkaido are to be revised as the Lower Yezo group, the Middle Yezo group, the Mikasa subgroup and the Upper Yezo group respectively., The boundary between the Lower and the Middle Yezo groups is here redefined., The so-called "Inkstone Series" in the Inner Zone of Southwest Japan is to be replaced by the following name, according to the newly established stratigraphical column of the type area., the Kwanmon group Upper: the Shimonoseki subgroup Lower: the Wakino subgroup
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  • Kazuo Huzita, Sunao Ogose
    1951 Volume 57 Issue 666 Pages 99-110
    Published: March 28, 1951
    Released: April 11, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In this paper, the following three problems concerning the lithologic classification of the Cenozoic strata in the northern area of Mizunami-machi are discussed in detail: (1) The writers' classification in comparison with the classifications hitherto maintained by many authors., (2) Supplemental discussions on the basis of divisions, (3) Some considerations on the stratigraphic nomenclature., These problems are all interesting and important for the recent Japanese geologists., Since 1949, Committee on the Stratigraphic Nomenclature has been established in the Geological Society of Japan., Writers expect that this paper offer practical data to the Committee.,
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  • Reiichiro Iwaida, Makoto Sasaki
    1951 Volume 57 Issue 666 Pages 111-118
    Published: March 28, 1951
    Released: April 11, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This survey was made to give materials to the project of reclamation of the land located at the south-western foot of Mt., Fuji or northern part of Fujinomiya City where irrigation water is strongly wanted., It was tried to explain the relation between the geological construction of this area and the groundwater., There are two big springs in Fujinomiya City., One is called Wakutama and the other Shibusawa (volume 4., 7m3 /sec respectively)., There are also springs in Shinosaka and Motomurayama., At first we studied the relation between these springs and the main route of groundwater, and then the form and origin of this route., The survey was based on the observation of the surface geology and the geophysical prospecting by methos of the electric resistivity., The groundwater of this area is flowing mainly through cracks, lave tunnels and lava domes in the Fuji lavas which flooded down along valleys on the surface of the Kofuji (old Fuji) tuff breccia., In the depression at the end of these valleys, the groundwater becomes stagnant and flows out over the lowest part of the wall-rocks, forming marked springs as those of Wakutama and Shibusawa., Thus it is possible to obtain large quantities of water from this main route of groudwater., Some amounts of water may be obtained also from the Susono sands and gravels covering the lower-part of the surface of the Fuji lave flows and the Kofuji tuff breccia.,
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