Comparative Education
Online ISSN : 2185-2073
Print ISSN : 0916-6785
ISSN-L : 0916-6785
Volume 2000 , Issue 26
Showing 1-28 articles out of 28 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 1-2
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 4
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 5-17
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 18-28
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 29-40
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 41-53
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 54-64
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 65-75
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 76-87
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • Focusing on the LEA Behaviour Support Plan
    Midori KAJIMA
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 91-110
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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    The purpose of this thesis is to consider the meanings and problems which Local Education Authorities (LEAs) are concerned with in coping with student behaviour problems through analysing the actual situation in England, focusing on the LEA Behaviour Support Plan (BSP). In England, the number of School Exclusions and Truancies increased dramatically in the 1990s. The Government could not over look this aggravated situation.
    The first of f icial figures of permanent exclusion appeared in 1994. This number was about 13, 000, a serious enough number to force the Government to treat behaviour problems as an important priority in policy reform.
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  • Shinji SAKANO
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 111-129
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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    Current features of educational reform and school conferences in the Federal Republic of Germany are much influenced by England and other European countries.
    These countries have a tendency in educational policy to enrich decision-making in schools. This means that each school should have unique characteristics and have to be accountable. For that reason each school should have a decision-making organisation as a school conference. School conferences in the German Laender (states) usually consist of representatives of teachers, parents and students. In addition to a school conference, each school has a teacher-conference, a parents-conference and a students-conference.
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  • Aoi NAKAYAMA
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 130-147
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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    This paper focuses on education for multicultural and multiethnic diversity in Germany. Multicultural and multiethnic diversity have been brought by foreign workers, resettlers (Aussiedler) from Poland and Russia and refugees after World War II. On the other hand, because of increased internationalization and the process of European unification it is necessary to take notice of the multicultural and multiethnic diversity in Europe. It can be said that these are educational tasks for multicultural and multiethnic diversity both inside and outside of Germany today. This paper aims to analyze these tasks by discussing education for multicultural and multiethnic diversity both inside and outside of Germany.
    To begin with I will focus on the education for multicultural and multiethnic diversity inside of Germany. It is pointed out that some steps have been taken to integrate the children of “foreign” workers into German schools. At first it was thought necessary and important to teach German to the children of “foreign” workers as soon as possible in order to integrate them into German schools. For example, German would be (and is) taught intensively in a “Preparative Class.” Then the backgrounds of the “foreign” children were taken into account. The languages and cultures of their home countries were also taught, but this was to prepare the children for returning to their home countries, because “foreign” workers were not expected to settle down in Germany. In the eighties, there were many discussions and much criticism of this compensatory education, a so-called “foreigner education” for “foreign” pupils. It was criticized that “foreign” pupils were thought to be “lacking” in respect to language abilities and socialization in comparison to German pupils. It was also pointed out that compensatory education, which intended to give “foreign” children an equal chance, also caused segregation and discrimination.
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  • Focusing on Analytic Instruments in the Transfer Of a Dual Vocational Education System
    Moriki TERADA
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 148-166
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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    In this article I will try to clarify discussions about the analytic instruments for system development and the contribution of comparative vocational education theory to international vocational education and training (VET) aid in the Federal Republic of Germany. I will first try to establish foundation for of comparative theory VET. My analysis will especially focus on German aid in the field of Dual Vocational Education and its transfer.The reason why the transfer issue of the dual system is considered is related to necessities which have to be verified in a discussion of the German dual system, a discussion which tends to fall in a period after the 1990's. Also, I would like to analyze this topic because Germany is the most energetic of all developed countries in the field of vocational education aid.
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  • Between Indigenous Knowledge and Western Knowledge
    Yoshihito II
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 167-186
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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    The main purpose of this paper is to clarify the characteristics of the higher education system for indigenous people in Australia though studying Batchelor College in the Northern Territory. Batchelor College is the only higher educational institution outside the Unified National System of university for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Through studying the characteristics of Batchelor College, it is also possible to clarify the current situation of higher education for indigenous students in Australia.
    An educational policy for improving the participation rate of indigenous students to higher education has been implemented in Australia since the end of the 1960's. This was the same period when indigenous people received citizenship in Australia. This policy, which was named the Aboriginal Study Grant Scheme (ABSTUDY), is a Scholarship for indigenous students who want to enter higher education. It is still in effect in the 1990's.
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  • Centered on the Diversification of Schools in Rural Areas
    Minoru MORISHITA
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 187-206
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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    In Thailand, the enrollment ratio of lower secondary education increased rapidly between 1990 (39.7%) and 1997 (74.2%). In Bangkok and areas around the city, lower secondary education expanded in the 1980's. Lower secondary education expanded remarkably in rural areas later. Educational opportunity for lower secondary education of rural primary school students had been expanded by implementation of the policy that primary schools under the jurisdiction of the Office of National Primary Education Commission (ONPEC) provide lower secondary education by means of existent resources since 1990. The period of compulsory education was six years at the level of primary education after the National Education Scheme of 1977.
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  • Political, Economic, and Social Backgrounds
    Yuto KITAMURA
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 207-225
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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    For the People's Republic of Bangladesh, through its independence movement from both India and Pakistan, college students were in a key position to lead the people as a political elite. The students who led the independence movements later became leaders of the country. They appear to have possessed a strong will to establish their own country and to provide better conditions for their people.
    Since the establishment of the People's Republic of Bangladesh in 1971, however, there have been continual political disorders. The country has also had difficuly developing its economy. For a better understanding of these current problems, it is necessary to understand the students in the independence movements during the East Pakistan era. It was they who took over political power and created a foundation for the country shortly after independence. Thus, it is important to analyze how they grasped their role as an elite in the society and their identity as Bangladeshis.
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 228-229
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 230-231
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 232-233
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 236-237
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 238-239
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 240-241
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 242-243
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 244-245
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 246-247
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 248
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 249
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2000 Volume 2000 Issue 26 Pages 250
    Published: July 05, 2000
    Released: January 27, 2011
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