Comparative Education
Online ISSN : 2185-2073
Print ISSN : 0916-6785
ISSN-L : 0916-6785
Volume 2003 , Issue 29
Showing 1-26 articles out of 26 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 2
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 3-15
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 16-24
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 25-41
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 42-52
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 53-64
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 65-77
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • Linkage of Practice and Evaluation in Tbaching
    Mayumi SAKAMOTO
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 81-96
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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    The purpose of this paper is to examine how teachers in England evaluate their teaching practice using the criteria based on OFSTED (The Office for Standards in Education) inspections. Also considered are the links and related problems between teaching practice and these evaluation criteria.
    This subject is of particular interest in the context of the new teacher appraisal system in Tokyo, which requires teachers to report on their own educational activities. The system of selfreporting there consists of ‘learning support’, ‘student guidance/career guidance’, ‘school management’ and ‘special activities/others’. Teachers in Tokyo have to set their own targets for assessing their activities in each category. Final appraisals are to be conducted by the school principal on the basis of the report submitted by each teacher.
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  • Yuki KURODA
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 97-113
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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    School choice is a controversial issue. Current school reform in the U. S. is based on market mechanisms, and recently many people have been seeking alternatives in the public sector including charter schools and voucher schemes. The purpose of this paper is to re-examine the ‘Controlled Choice Plan’ in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In ‘Politics, Markets, & America's Schools’, John Chubb and Terry Moe made the case for public school choice based on market controls and their ideas have given great impetus to the subject. They tried to present the Controlled Choice Plan in Cambridge as a typical case of school choice reform in the public sector. In their assessment the Cambridge plan has been a huge improvement in comparison with the troubled past; the racial imbalance has dramatically changed for the better, student achievement scores are up, teachers are more satisfied with their jobs, parents and students are happier with their schools and the public schools are winning back students from the private sector. They also claimed that ‘the Cambridge plan did not go far enough’, as the supply side remained under the control of all the usual democratic institutions, such as the central office and Cambridge resident experts.
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  • Kosaku NAGAMINE
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 114-132
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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    This paper considers the characteristics of the home schooling movement which rose to prominence in the United States during the 1980s. Home schooling consists of instruction and learning conducted in a family setting in place of attending at school. The numbers of ‘home schoolers’ have been increasing rapidly in recent years, and according to an estimate by P. M. Lines they have reached a total of between 1.5 million and 2million.
    The growth of home schooling may be explained in terms of two separate movements, both educational and social. Viewed in social terms encompassing political, cultural, and religious elements, it may be thought of as having received strong influences from the new conservatism and the new religious right. The new religious right became a powerful voice in the United States during the 1980s, and this was reflected in the development of home schooling at the time. On the other hand, home schooling also grew as part of an educational movement organized by people who sought an alternative to public education. Criticism of public education had become widespread since the 1960s, and education at home was seen as a means of avoiding exposure to a discredited system.
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  • Focus on the New Subject ‘Life Skill’
    Maki YOSHINAKA
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 133-150
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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    The purpose of this paper is to outline the characteristics of school health education in Myanmar, with special focus on the recent introduction of the new subject ‘Life Skill (Ba-wa Twe Tha)’ within the school curriculum. Also examined is the role played by international agencies in establishing the school health program there.
    Although many studies have been carried out on school health education in developing countries, little is known about how such programs take root in different cultures, and how specific cultural hazards are addressed. Typical of this trend, for example, are the studies conducted by the World Bank, which have mainly focused on economic efficiency.
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  • Field Study in Perak State, Malaysia
    Akiko KAMOGAWA
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 151-168
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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    Since the 1990s, international organizations and international aid donors have shown great interest in educational gender gaps observed in quantitative terms. In the fields of Comparative and International Education, the number of studies dealing with educational gender gaps has steadily increased. However, the needs and wishes of women themselves require more careful consideration in the light of various cultural factors. In Malaysia, for example, both researchers and policy-makers tend to focus much less on gender issues than on ethnic issues, and to view women as members of an ethnic group, rather than in gender terms. Since gender issues are relevant to various other factors, it is important to give due attention to the gender perspective in examining women's educational aspirations and career choices, and how they intersect with language, religion, race, class and ethnicity.
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  • Focus on Conflict with Islamic Madrasa Schools
    Tatsuya KUSAKABE
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 169-185
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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    Most children in the Yeople's Republic of Bangladesh now have access to primary education, since figures for 2002 show that school enrollment has reached 97.49%. In statistical terms at least, therefore, the country may be said to have attained the global standards outlined in the Education for All declaration of 1990. This study takes the perspective of an internal comparative analysis to examine the acceptance of primary education system in rural Bangladesh. The findings are based on the analysis of data collected and research conducted on and off since 1999 in the course of fieldwork in rural parts of the country.
    Bangladesh is separated physically by the River Ganges into western and eastern parts but there are numerous other features that reinforce this division such as natural environment, agricultural crops, social structure, lifestyle and religion. This study focuses in particular on the ‘people's religious mind’. Data suggests that the eastern part of the country is characterized by strong Islamic faith, as the lifestyle of the Muslim population there closely reflects the teachings of the Koran. In the western part of the country Islamic faith is considered weaker as the Muslim population lives amongst people of other religions such as Hindus and Christians.
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  • A Content Analysis
    Sherlyne A. Almonte
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 186-204
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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    The purpose of this paper is to content analyze the nature and extent of the inclusion of national identity in elementary Moral Education textbooks in the Philippines. This analysis has been made possible using a set of orientations as parameters to define the concept national identity with specific application to the Philippine case.
    National identity is considered to be the most crucial political belief that any individual ever acquires (Verba (1965), in Doronilla, 1989, p.45). In this vein, it is thought necessary to socialize citizens in order to foster national identity and naturally education plays a key role in making this possible. Socialization of citizens through the education sector involves various methods including the use of textbooks. In the case of the Philippines, the state authorities work hand in hand with the education sector to instill such political belief.
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 206-207
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 208-209
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 210-211
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 212-213
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 216-218
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 219-221
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 222-224
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 225-227
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 228
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 228a-229
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 229-230
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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  • [in Japanese]
    2003 Volume 2003 Issue 29 Pages 230
    Published: June 27, 2003
    Released: January 27, 2011
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