The Journal of Human Relations
Online ISSN : 2433-1961
Print ISSN : 1340-8186
Volume 6 , Issue 1
Showing 1-18 articles out of 18 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages Cover1-
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages Cover2-
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
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    Download PDF (27K)
  • Type: Appendix
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages App1-
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages App2-
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Kouji OISHI, Masanori KARAIWA, Nana TAKAHASHI, Suguru BABA
    Type: Article
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages 1-11
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
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    The purpose of this study is to consider emvironmental variables interfering with setting up and off the behavior in swimming activity as an integrated community recreation. A subject who has been provided individualized positive behavior support program is an adolescent with autism and severe mental retardation. The task analysis and the discrepancy analysis on an integrated community recreation has been implemented in vivo, based on the viewpoints that proposed Davis and Cuvo (1997). Results showed (a)support providers have the necessity of finding up and developing natural supports resources, (b)they have the necessity of identifying functional natural cues and/or barrier, and (c)they have the necessity of restructuring emvironmental conditions to give systematic and efficient instructions for a subject. In addition, increase of the empirical and practical studies contributes to a least restrictive emvironment and normalization.
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  • Shunji TAHARA
    Type: Article
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages 13-24
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
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    It is generally said that each person takes the particular role in a bullying situation (i.e., "a bully", "a bullied", "an audience" or "an onlooker"). Some researchers hypothesized that the cause of a bullying could attribute to particular factors (e.g., "personality", "nursery attitude" or "the stress of entrance examination" and so on) and the role which each person took in a bullying situation was discriminated according to these factors. The purpose of this study is to confirm whether the hypothesis is correct. Questionnaire method was used and 189 university students answered of this questionnaire. Frequency analysis showed that subjects prototypically regarded the cause of a bullying as "the stress of entrance examination", "personality", "heterogeneity" and "group dynamics". But Fisher's exact test suggested that there were only a few significant differences for these prototyped causes among roles in a bullying situation. This result indicated that while people thought "the bully" and "the bullied" to have some stereotyped causes, "the bully" and "the bullied" did not have such prototyped causes in real. Fisher's exact test also showed that one candidate to discriminate the role in a bullying situation is the strategy which each person used to avoid to be "the bullied". The reason this strategy is the useful discriminator to the bullying is discussed.
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  • Masayuki KATO
    Type: Article
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages 25-34
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
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    School absentees generally feel uneasy when they are with others. This is because they suspect that others may be criticizing them for their inability to attend school. On the other hand, this causes them to hope that others understand and accept them warmly. In spite of what was mentioned above, they occasionally, especially when they are with the adult whom they can trust, play the role of a typical bad child whose behavior is difficult for adults in general to understand. When this behavior of 'school absentees' is considered under Heidegger's meditation, they cannot help being troubled with the suspect that the public is criticizing them severely, as long as they think of themselves as an exception who cannot attend school as other students do. They feel this way even if individuals around them are not criticizing them. Heidegger says that human beings cannot but be conscious of the existence of their public, even though there are no individuals around them. That is why school absentees are nervous about the public criticizing them while they are withdrawing from school. Therefore, as they feel the public paying attention to them, they tend to make the effort to imitate good children's behavior that is thought of as proper in general. However, this results in harming school absentees because it prevents them from showing themselves as they are, even to the people who have a close relationship with them. To ease this pain, they eagerly try to disguise themselves and show themselves as a bad child when they are with the people who are reliable. They do so to find a person who is special to them in that he or she can understand they cannot be good children completely and accept them as they are. This is how they try to remove their anguish caused by not being able to reveal what they really are even to the people who are very close to them.
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  • Kiyoko TANAKA, Masako IKEZAWA
    Type: Article
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages 35-43
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
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    Though cross - cultural interchanges have been promoted in recent times, constant cross - cultural conflict continues among nations. In order to dissolve this issue it is necessary to analyze factors from not only the macro viewpoint but also the micro viewpoint (i. e. relationship among individuals). In this research note, some of the primary causes of friction created with different cultures will be considered, as well as ways of dissolving these causes in every aspect of micro factors. In the first chapter, cultures will be classified according to their nature being "visible" or "invisible", and then analyzed. In the second chapter, invisible culture is focused on, and classified under three senses of value; (1) personal sense of value, (2) social cultural sense of value, and (3) universal sense of value. And furthermore, this research note addresses "culture shock" which arises out of conflict between the three senses of value and it's specific causes. In the third chapter, "expectation", "identity crisis" and "receptive mode" will be taken and studied as the preferred strategy for dealing with culture shock.
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  • Type: Appendix
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages 45-
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages 46-49
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages 50-56
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages 57-67
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages 68-75
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages App3-
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (61K)
  • Type: Appendix
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages App4-
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (61K)
  • Type: Appendix
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages App5-
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
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    Download PDF (61K)
  • Type: Cover
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages Cover3-
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (38K)
  • Type: Cover
    1999 Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages Cover4-
    Published: September 30, 1999
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (38K)
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