Journal of Japan Industrial Management Association
Online ISSN : 2187-9079
Print ISSN : 1342-2618
ISSN-L : 1342-2618
Volume 58 , Issue 3
Showing 1-19 articles out of 19 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages Cover5-
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages Cover6-
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Type: Index
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages Toc3-
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Mizuho Ogikubo, Takao Enkawa
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages 167-172
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this research is to compare customer satisfaction among countries and explore its influential factors. Using customer satisfaction data of Japan, the U.S., Sweden, Germany and five other European countries, we analyzed the effect of economic institutions and national culture on customer satisfaction. The results indicated that: (1) there is a systematic difference in customer satisfaction between countries, (2) customer satisfaction is higher in economically freer countries, and (3) customer satisfaction is higher in countries where individualism is higher and uncertainty avoidance is weaker. This research is a first attempt to explain customer satisfaction by national contexts. As implications for multinational companies, high quality does not always mean high customer satisfaction in certain countries. Therefore special efforts are necessary in marketing a product/service in countries where uncertainty avoidance is strong because consumers' expectations and demand levels are higher than other countries.
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  • Toshitake KOHMURA, Kazunobu FUKUSHIMA, Masamitsu KIUCHI
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages 173-181
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This paper presents a generalized production-sales model that can be used to maximize profit. The proposed model determines whether a Make-to-Order system or a Make-to-Stock system is the most profitable in a given situation. Applying the two parameters of stock cost and customer's allowance of lead time, the production-sales profit is calculated based on the condition that the product demand in a unit period is followed by a probability distribution. By finding the inventory level that maximizes the production-sales profit, the solution for the mathematical model is found. A retail store maintains some inventory for selling a product to customers during a given unit period. If demand is more than expected and the inventory becomes insufficient, the retail store asks the manufacturing plant to supply additional volume to the store. Since it takes a certain lead time to deliver the additional inventory, it becomes necessary to make the customer wait for a given lead time. The yield parameter is the percentage of customers willing to wait.
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  • Kenta MIKAWA, Tsutomu TAKAHASHI, Masayuki GOTO
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages 182-192
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Recently, marketing activities are gradually shifting from making new customers to keeping current customers because of the intensifying market competition. Hence, keeping customers is related to improving customer satisfaction and customer loyalty. Ultimately keeping a customer means improving of lifetime value. In addition, it has been found that there are many effects for the company. Therefore, companies aiming to improve their profits need to focus on the components of customer loyalty. However, it is difficult to specify those factors because the structure of customer loyalty is very complex and its composition differs from customer to customer. This research uses a methodology interview and free-ended questionnaire data to map the customer loyalty structure. In order to clarify constitutes customer loyalty, the method of morphological analysis as the way of natural language techniques is introduced. This is used because there is much free-ended text data that companies can accumulate easily as the result of developing information technologies. Using these data, text mining can be applied, which is one of the important ways of obtaining information for CRM (customer relationship management). Through analysis, using the concept of text mining and the introduction of knowledge of the field in the study of customer loyalty, we find the structure of loyalty and consider how to improve these assumptions. Principal component analysis using the structure extracted from the text type comments of customers and vector spaces made by the structure and word frequency in each text gives us various findings about customer loyalty.
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  • Shinji IMOTO, Yoshiyuki YABUUCHI, Jyunzo WATADA
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages 193-199
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Engineering and technology play an important role in strengthening the competitive power of a company and surviving the severe competition in today's global market. About 70% of the total R & D investment in Japan comes from the private sector. It is most important to decide which research projects have to be adopted for future research out of proposals received from the various divisions and sections in a company. The objective of this paper is to introduce a method for analyzing the results of experts' evaluations for selecting proposals submitted for R & D and to model those expert evaluations. This paper analyzes the research and development of a certain manufacturing company in the heavy metallurgies industry. We employed a principal component model, the dual-scaling analytic hierarchy process to analyze the results of expert evaluations of proposed research projects for single or plural fiscal years. The experts' evaluations analyzed based or (1) the objective of the research project, (2) its background, (3) its research contents, (4) the expected effect, (5) the possibility of obtaining patents, (6) project schedule, and (7) developing cost, etc. The results from the proposed model offer the same selection of projects as the experts did.
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  • Hiroki YAMASHITA, Hisashi NAKAMURA, Akinori GOTO, Hirohisa HIRAI
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages 200-207
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study investigates whether large book-tax differences in Japan are associated with less persistent earnings, accruals, or cash flows. Prior research in the U.S. reports that large book-tax differences are indicative of earnings that are less persistent. However, since the Japanese corporate tax code requires that financial statements for outside stakeholders form the basis for determining taxable income, Japan is an environment in which book income and taxable income correspond more closely compared to that of the U.S. Some studies report that book-tax differences in Japan are negative and stable. In this environment, there is no evidence that large book-tax differences are associated with less persistent earnings. In addition, we incorporate not only temporary book-tax differences, but also permanent book-tax differences into our analysis. We find evidence consistent with large negative book-tax differences (i.e., taxable income exceeds book income) being associated with less persistent earnings, accruals, and cash flows. The results of additional analysis are also consistent with these results. The main results do not indicate that for firm-years with large positive book-tax differences, earnings, accruals, and cash flows are less persistent as compared to firm-years with small book-tax differences. However, some results of additional analysis indicate that large positive book-tax differences are also indicative of earnings that are less persistent. This study contributes to the literature that investigates information regarding book-tax differences.
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  • Hidehisa Iwamoto, Yasuhiro Kajihara, Seiko Taki, Shuji Seki
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages 208-217
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    It is important to clarify characteristics of skilled workers' motion in order to hand down and conserve their technical skills. This study focuses on analyzing a senior surgeon's needle handling motion to support the surgical training for unskilled operators. The importance of surgical training is well known, because the lives of patients must not be endangered by unskilled operators even at the initial stage of their skills training. The needle handling motion is modeled by reproducing four kinds of patterns based on a surgeon's needle traces using a robot. The characteristics of the needle handling motion are considered by comparing the trace after suturing with the track of the needle and measuring the rotation torque of the needle holder. As a result, the track pattern along the curvature of the needle indicated that the rotation torque and difference between the track and trace were minimum. However, the handling motion during actual surgery was deeper than the curvature of the needle. So, by comparison, the track pattern, which was deeply revised midway through suturing, could lead to both a minimum trace difference and minimum rotation torque.
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  • Sung-Hoon LEE, Masanobu MATSUMARU
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages 218-227
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
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    In this study, we use a method called "Fractional Integration" to avoid overdifference in real number differences when analyzing long-term memory in consideration of long-term memory of time series data. We examine the characteristics of long memory and short memory for economic time-series data and raise the precision of a prediction value by an appropriate fraction difference. In addition, we suggest that the Fuzzy Fractionally Integrated State Space model is a prediction value that is not inclined to a specific value when using fuzzy logic for economic time-series data (stock price; lauching price, low price, high price, closing price, etc.). Precision of volatility prediction can be forecasted using the Fuzzy Fractionally Integrated Generalized Auto-regressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity (FI-GARCH) model. Furthermore, risk control is performed using a put option and portfolio insurance (PI), which has an insurance function for falling prices. We decided to use the volatility prediction provided in the FI-GARCH model for an optional price decision model of Black-Scholes for PI. Finally, a comparison of average rate of return and the risk hedge effect is carried out by numerical simulation.
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  • Mitumasa KUMAZAWA
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages 228-238
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In the pursuance of work, there are cases in which different work postures are used for the same work purpose. Recently, with the use of Toyota production system, cases in which work is performed while sitting in a chair are changing to work where there is increased walking of several steps required. This is a study of the relation of fatigue feeling and work postures. In this study, the Questionnaire for Subjective Fatigue Feeling by Industrial Fatigue Research Committee of Japan Association of Industrial Health was used. Objective work postures were multi-process holding (standing posture with several steps regularly), standing posture (standing posture with walking intermittently) and chair-sitting posture. The objective tasks were sawing and fiber processing. This study focused on women as the object of study. The subjects for multi-process holding were nine newly employed women (who graduated from senior high school) and eight experienced women, the subjects for standing were 12 newly employed women and 13 experienced women, and the subjects for chair-sitting were nine newly employed women and nine experienced women. As a result of this study, there was not much difference in the fatigue feeling between multi-process holding and chair-sitting. It was shown that fatigue feeling from standing is not always high compared to that experienced when sitting in a chair. However even in the cases of standing posture caused by quantity and frequency of walking, the possibility of increased fatigue feeling and accumulation by quantity or frequency of walks was suggested.
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  • Chhaing HUY, Masatoshi TANAKA, Shin'ichi YOSHIKAWA, Eiji TAKEDA
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages 239-245
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In this paper, we attempt to identify two other important factors that may help to explain the reality of current Business-to-Business (B2B) Internet-based electronic markets (e-markets): the kind of transaction fees that e-market owners charge participants, and the kind of supply chain coordination mechanisms that B2B e-markets facilitate. In a previous model, the policy to coordinate was full return policy. That is, if retailer's order quantity is leftover, the leftover is bought back by supplier. However, in real situations, we consider that all the leftovers aren't bought back by the supplier, with a portion of the leftovers being bought back. We call this system a partial return policy. First, the expected profits of firms participating in e-markets with that of firms participating in traditional markets are compared. Second, the conditions under which both suppliers and retailers would prefer participating in e-markets instead of traditional markets are identified. Lastly, the role of supply chain coordination contracts in offering strong incentives to both retailer and supplier to participate in e-markets is investigated.
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  • Type: Appendix
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages App11-
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages App12-
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages App13-
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
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    Download PDF (83K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages App14-
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
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    Download PDF (83K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages App15-
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (83K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages App16-
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (83K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2007 Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages App17-
    Published: August 15, 2007
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (83K)
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