Journal of Japan Industrial Management Association
Online ISSN : 2187-9079
Print ISSN : 1342-2618
ISSN-L : 1342-2618
Volume 59 , Issue 3
Showing 1-17 articles out of 17 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages Cover5-
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages Cover6-
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Type: Index
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages Toc3-
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Takayoshi Tamura, Mototsugu Yamazaki, Tej S. Dhakar, Katsuhisa Ohno
    Type: Article
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages 205-213
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Instead of conventional constant speed assembly lines, complex free flow assembly lines are sometimes utilized to assemble many product variants in automobile and other industries. In such assembly lines, a job is transferred to the next stage when the transfer is permissible and the next stage is vacant. Two types of buffers, series and parallel, are used along the line. A series buffer can be considered as a stage with a zero processing time. With a parallel buffer, some work can be postponed, i.e., the production sequence can be changed after the parallel buffer. In this paper, we will formulate a production sequencing problem explicitly for a complex free flow assembly line with bypass stages as well as parallel buffers. We validate the formulation by solving some examples using mathematical software. This formulation will be useful to evaluate the objective function value more efficiently than executing a simulation in meta-heuristic algorithms, although the way how to evaluate the objective value using the formulation is not discussed in the paper.
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  • Masahiro KAMEDA, Mitsuru JINDAI, Satoru SHIBATA, Tomonori YAMAMOTO
    Type: Article
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages 214-221
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
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    Recently, cell manufacturing systems are being adopted at many factories. In such manufacturing systems, workers are required to retrieve various parts from different places during the assembly process. Therefore, it is expected that more effective manufacturing can be realized using automatic parts supply systems for the workers. One of the effective methods is a handing-over motion done by a robot as a method of automatic parts supply. The handing-over motion of the robot must not only be physically safe, but also psychologically comfortable. In addition, there are individual preferences for the most comfortable handing-over motion. In particular, when a robot hands over parts to a particular worker (cooperator), the motion characteristics of the robot should be the most comfortable for him or her. It is considered that a human-machine interface, via which the cooperator adjusts the motion characteristics of the robot, is necessary. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a human-machine interface which is used to adjust the motion characteristics for a handing-over robot system that supplies parts. Firstly, a prototype handing-over robot system in which the cooperator can adjust the motion characteristics of the robot (maximum velocity, peak of velocity profile and handing position) by a human-machine interface using a speech recognition is developed. Using this robot system, cooperators can realize the most comfortable handing-over motion by adjusting the motion characteristics of the robot. Then the differences between the motion characteristics of unskilled and skilled cooperators are analyzed using the robot system. From the analysis, we propose a human-machine interface giving consideration to the differences. Furthermore, a handing-over robot system that adapts the proposed human-machine interface was developed. The effectiveness of the proposed human-machine interface is demonstrated by evaluation.
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  • Toshitake KOHMURA, Kazunobu FUKUSHIMA, Masamitsu KIUCHI
    Type: Article
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages 222-230
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
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    A production-sales model is proposed for a model group company consisting of a manufacturing plant and a retail store. The present model covers the Make-to-Order and Make-to-Stock models. The customer demand for a product during a unit period fluctuates by a probability distribution. The retail store maintains some inventory storage in order to prepare for sales. If the inventory storage is insufficient, the retail store requests the manufacturing plant to supply additional volume, and the store may lose some profit because of a deficient yield in the number of customers willing to wait for the supply. The Make-to-Order model is based on a high customer yield and the Make-to-Stock model is based on a low inventory storage fee. The production sales profit of the model group company is formulated in terms of the following parameters: inventory storage fee and customer yield percentage. By maximizing the production sales profit, the problem of finding the amount of inventry storage yielding the most profit is solved. An index of "Propensity to Stock" is defined in the present production sales model. For a product with a positive propensity to stock, inventory storage of the product is favored to make the production-sales more profitable. On the other hand, for a product with a negative propensity to stock, production on demand for the product is favored. Thus, the propensity to stock for a particular product indicates whether a Production-Sales model, Make-to-Order model or Make-to-Stock model is the most profitable.
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  • Hitoshi YANO, Masatoshi SAKAWA
    Type: Article
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages 231-242
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In this paper, we focus on multilevel multiobjective programming problems (MLMOPs) where multiple decision makers in a hierarchical organization have their own multiple objective functions. For MLMOPs, we propose an interactive fuzzy decision making method to obtain a satisfactory solution which reflects not only the hierarchical relationships between multiple decision makers, but also their own preferences for their objective functions from among the generalized Λ-extreme point set. The concept of generalized Λ-extreme points is defined by using the Λ-extreme points of each decision maker, which is an extended concept of Pareto optimal solutions in multiob jective programming problems. In the proposed method, after the decision makers specify the decision powers and reference membership values for their membership functions, the corresponding generalized Λ-extreme point is obtained on the basis of the hyperplane method. In order to show the efficiency of the proposed method, an illustrative numerical example and an industrial pollution control problem in Japan are demonstrated along with the computer outputs.
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  • Rui OHKUBO, Kiyoshi DOWAKI
    Type: Article
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages 243-252
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
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    Since the enactment of the Kyoto Protocol, renewable energy technologies have been an attractive subject in Japan. Especially, technologies related to biomass resource use are promising as waste materials in local areas can be reduced or recycled, and the system can turn a profit. In this paper, we describe the biomass energy systems of a cogeneration system (CGS) and a bio-hydrogen production system (Bio-H_2) that effectively uses the waste material of a mushroom bed from the viewpoints of CO_2 emission mitigation and business potential. CO_2 emission mitigation was estimated using Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology. Additionally, the moisture content of the biomass materials and/or the transportation distance were considered applying the Monte Carlo simulation. In the case of a processing fee of 15,000yen/t and a subsidy rate of 50%, CO_2 emissions and energy costs were as follows: CO_2 emissions and the power price through CGS were 20.3 to 34.2g-CO_2/MJ and 11.5 to 16.8yen/kWh. On the other hand, in the case of the Bio-H_2 production system, they were 31.9 to 45.8g-CO_2/MJ and 61 to 81yen/Nm^3.
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  • Aki TAKEDA, Masahiro NOWATARI
    Type: Article
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages 253-259
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study contrasts and confirms the awareness of teamwork between American and Japanese employees working for a Japanese company, which is based in Japan and has an American branch. Teamwork awareness is comprised of two categories, Task Orientation and People Orientation, each of which consists of six factors. The purpose of this study is to do statistical and multivariate analyses of the teamwork awareness factors identified, and consider the internal structure of those factors. It is assumed that this research establishes a basis on which management can be viewed from an international perspective. The following hypotheses were accepted: "That the Japanese mean value of teamwork is different from the American mean value." "That the Japanese mean value of task orientation is different from that of American mean value." "That the Japanese mean value of people orientation is different from that of the American mean value."
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  • Mitsuo YAMASHIRO
    Type: Article
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages 260-268
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
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    Network models can be analyzed using the Graphical Evaluation and Review Technique (GERT) approach and a mathematical computer system (Mathematica). The system is a useful software for symbolic and numeric computation. In this study, two examples of GERT network models are shown. The mean and variance of total activity time are obtained from the results of analysis and numeric computation using the software system.
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  • Michiko TSUBAKI, Saki WAKABAYASHI
    Type: Article
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages 269-281
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In the field of management system engineering, there is a management technique named Customer Relationship Management (CRM) for making the best use of management information. It is a management technique that maintains constructing the relationship needed by the customer, while accurately understanding the customer and keeping the values desired by the customer fulfilled. In this paper, we expand the idea, propose Student Relationship Management (SRM) to construct and maintain an excellent long-term mutual relationship between the university and students, and also propose a matrix of learning needs as a tool for achieving SRM. Finally, we show a method for segmenting students according to learning type, for study support based on the idea of SRM.
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  • Type: Appendix
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages 282-
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages App11-
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (84K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages App12-
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (84K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages App13-
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (84K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages App14-
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (84K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2008 Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages App15-
    Published: August 15, 2008
    Released: November 01, 2017
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    Download PDF (84K)
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