Palliative Care Research
Online ISSN : 1880-5302
ISSN-L : 1880-5302
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Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
Original Research
  • Satoshi Murakami, Asami Igarashi, Kanako Miyano, Yasuhito Uezono, Waka ...
    2019 Volume 14 Issue 3 Pages 159-167
    Published: 2019
    Released: July 16, 2019
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    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate hangeshashinto rinse for oral discomfort in terminally-ill cancer patients and to compare the effectiveness of hangeshashinto rinse with or without honey rinse. Methods: Patients with oral discomfort were randomized to receive either hangeshashinto rinse or hangeshashinto with honey rinse as first-line treatment. Patients performed oral rinse three to five times a day for 2 weeks. Further, oral wetness, halitosis, oral mucositis, mouth discomfort, compliance of rinse were then evaluated before and after the intervention. Results: 144 patients were enrolled during this period and 22 patients completed the study (hangeshashinto 13 / hangeshashinto with honey 9). After the intervention, oral wetness was improved, and end-tidal concentration of hydrogen sulfide was decreased in both cases. Although there was no statistically significant difference, oral discomfort by subjective and objective evaluations, also and symptom of oral mucositis were improved. Other volatile sulfur compounds decreased. Frequency of rinsing between groups receiving hangeshashinto or hangeshashinto with honey did not differ, however, the acceptability was slightly better in the honey combination group. Conclusion: Both hangeshashinto rinse and hangeshashinto with honey rinse reduced end-tidal concentration of hydrogen sulfide and improved oral wetness. Oral rinse by hangeshashinto or hangeshashinto with honey may be effective for oral discomfort in terminally-ill cancer patients.

  • Daisuke Kiuchi, Takayuki Hisanaga, Shingo Hagiwara, Katsuya Abe, Akira ...
    2019 Volume 14 Issue 3 Pages 169-175
    Published: 2019
    Released: July 30, 2019
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    Context: Delirium in cancer is often difficult to control and refractory when haloperidol is invalid which is considered standard therapy. We need second and subsequent-line therapy to reduce hyperactivity and not to over-sedation for refractory delirium. Objectives: To investigate the efficacy and safety of continuous subcutaneous infusion chlorpromazine on delirium refractory to first-line antipsychiatric medications in advanced cancer palliative care setting. Method: The study population consisted of patients who received continuous subcutaneous infusion chlorpromazine for delirium at two certified PCU. Primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who showed improvements in delirium severity by Delirium Rating Scale Revised 98 score of less than 13 or decrease from baseline and maintained the ability to communicate coherently by Communication Capacity Scale Item-4 score of 2 or less. Secondary outcome were the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale subscale score, and injection site reactions evaluated according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. These outcome measures were assessed at baseline, 48 hours and 7 days after the start of the study. Result: Among eighty-four patients, sixty were positive responders (71.4%, 95% CI [61–80]). The mean CCS Item-4 scores significantly decreased from the baseline value of 1.48 (range 0–3) to 1.03 (range 0–3) at post-treatment (p<0.001). Grade 2 or higher injection site reactions were observed in 1 patient (1.2%, 95% CI [0–7]). Conclusion: Our study suggested that continuous subcutaneous infusion chlorpromazine could improve refractory delirium symptoms and patients’ communication capabilities. Although most of the skin disorders observed in association with chlorpromazine were mild, their incidence rates were relatively high, suggesting the need for careful monitoring.

  • Akiko Unesoko, Kazuki Sato, Yuka Onishi, Mitsunori Miyashita, Tatsuya ...
    2019 Volume 14 Issue 3 Pages 177-185
    Published: 2019
    Released: August 01, 2019
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    Objectives: To assess the perception of care and outcomes of end-of-life palliative care by bereaved family members to determine differences in care provided to patients with and without cancer. Methods: This cross-sectional, anonymous survey using a self-reporting questionnaire for bereaved family members was conducted online. Care was assessed using overall satisfaction score and the care evaluation scale (CES) and outcomes were assessed using good death inventory (GDI). Results: The present study included data from 118 patients with cancer and 299 patients without cancer (103, heart failure; 71, stroke; and 125, pneumonia). The overall satisfaction score was not significantly different between patients with and without cancer. Conversely, physical care score in the CES and autonomy score in the GDI were significantly lower in patients without cancer than in patients with cancer (p<0.05). Conclusion: The satisfaction with end-of-life care was comparable between the bereaved family members of patients without cancer and those of patients with cancer. However, results related to some items of CES and GDI suggest that some components of end-of-life care for patients without cancer might require attention. Not only treatment of the underlying disease but also relief of suffering is important to improve end-of-life care.

Short Communications
  • Kotaro Hashimoto, Kazuki Sato, Mitsuharu Sasaki, Hiroaki Takabayashi, ...
    2019 Volume 14 Issue 3 Pages 187-192
    Published: 2019
    Released: August 01, 2019
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    Objective: This study investigated the association between use of sedatives in terminal cancer patients near death who were receiving home care and the home care period. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records for 1032 cancer patients who received home palliative care from 17 specialized home care clinics between June and November 2013. We checked the use of sedatives within 48 hours before death at home, and we compared the home care period between patients with and without sedation. Results: The sedatives used were diazepam (n, %: 100, 52%), flunitrazepam (29, 15%), bromazepam (27, 14%), midazolam (26, 13%), and phenobarbital (20, 10%). The median home care period (median [quartiles]) was 26 [13, 63] days and 25 [10, 64] days (Adj p=0.79) for the patients with and without sedatives, respectively. Conclusion: Among terminal cancer patients near death receiving home care, 24% were administered sedatives, with more than half of those patients receiving diazepam. There was no association between use of sedatives and the home care period.

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