Journal of Japanese Society of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology
Online ISSN : 2189-7980
Print ISSN : 1345-2894
ISSN-L : 1345-2894
Volume 5 , Issue 2
Showing 1-38 articles out of 38 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages Cover1-
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Index
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages Toc1-
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 83-86
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 87-
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 87-
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 88-
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 91-93
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 95-99
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 100-111
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 112-115
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Keiko KAWAKAMI
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 116-122
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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    In this study, I referred the mean of eating disorder from the point of view as an equality between eating, instinct and comfortableness. The eating behavior of human is started as a basal comfortableness and is developed to a measure for human relationship or a behavior, which is necessary to be controlled. It should be a base of whole comfortableness, but it is so hard for contemporary females to obtain such basal feeling of pleasure, especially in cases with eating disorder. Various episode from their life history and eating behavior, imply inequality between eating and comfortableness. And women are fed from complicated elements although men are able to be fed from change the style of feeding in a turning period of their lives. That is very hard task for females. In past, women had no conflict to decide the lifestyle by themselves, however in present, they are confused in front of innumerable optional dictions. Many contemporary females would be able to breakthrough such conflict by powered from better meals than past foods. But patient with eating disorder have so poor energy to confront such conflict because they miss to basal comfortableness of eating by many reasons. Thus they would be suffered from eating disorder. The trigger of the first onset of eating disorder is trouble human relationships in whole patients, and they obsess to eating, which have intimate relation with communication. They are seemed to deny development of human relationships. From above phenomenon, I hypothesize the onset of eating disorder as follows; The first learning is about the equality between eating and comfortableness and the equality between eating and management of human relationships is second. These would develop interactivity. The third element is development of human relationships in each life-stage, I speculate that eating influence closely to it. The fourth, these are task for only women, not men. In conclusion, I thought as like as mathematically, that the first onset of eating disorder would appear when the absolute product of the 1st. and 2nd. is less than sum of the 3rd. and 4th. elements.
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 123-132
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Shinji SEKI, Miho SAKURADA, Yuuko HIRASAWA, Satoshi NEGISHI, Seiichi S ...
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 133-141
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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    The therapeutic effects of GLA containing oil in the relief of symptoms associated with PMS were studied. In a randomized and placebo-controlled trial, we studied 54 women between 20〜37 years of age who were diagnosed with PMS over three menstrual cycles. The women recorded their premenstrual symptoms before and during the trial every day, using the "PMS memory of the Japanese family planning association". The edible oil mixture adjusted to the S:M:P ratio was used as a control standard. Based on the frequency and the severity of the PMS symptoms before and during the trial, GLA treatment tended to reduce frequency and alleviate the symptoms, especially physical symptoms, better than a placebo did. More patients (64.4%) reported improvement in their sum of the PMS symptoms during GLA treatment as compared to placebo treatment (53.5%). This difference was statistically significant. As to individual symptoms, "Abdominal bloating", "Headache", "Sharpened appetite" and "Constipation" tended to be alleviated more frequently by the GLA treatment These results suggested that GLA containing oil was effective in alleviating some of the PMS symptoms.
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  • Shinji SEKI, Miho SAKURADA, Yuuko HIRASAWA, Hiroaki TSUJI, Seiichi MAT ...
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 142-149
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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    We examined the awareness of 233 mainly working women between 20〜39 years of age concerning the unspecific symptoms that occur preceding menstruation. In the symptoms examination, 104 women surveyed made it a point to record their symptoms preceding and during menstruation every day. The examination of the level of awareness showed that 216 women (92.7%) noticed some physical or psychological changes, and 131 women (51.0%) worried about the psychological changes. The examination of unspecific symptoms that occur preceding menstruation showed that 53 women (51.0%, A group) had at least one symptom that influenced daily life, and 30 women (28.8%, B group) tended to have premenstrual symptoms that did not influence daily life but which periodically occur preceding the menstruation luteal phase. Limiting the survey to working women who had not given birth that were observed separately in their twenties〜thirties, the severity and frequency of symptoms, tended to be significantly lower for those in their thirties. In the examination, symptoms associated with the premenstrual syndrome came alleviated and decreased for patients as they progressed in age, however, symptoms were different for different age groups. In relation to the symptoms at menstruation, women who suffered severe PMS symptoms, tended to suffer severe symptoms at menstruation, and their spontaneous healing ability was also weak.
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  • Keiko OHI, Mieko SOKABE, Emiko KISHI, Mariko TOMITA, Hisako TAKAMURA
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 150-154
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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    This study was conducted to understand the sexual life and the level of satisfaction between married couples after childbirth. There were 69 married coulres, and wives were in a postpartum period (between 3 and 12 months following delivery). Both husbands and wives filled out the separate questionnaires sent by mail. The results showed that most couples recognize sexuality as a mode of communication, however this was significantly higher in women than men. About 50% of both men and women replied that reproduction was one of the roles of sexuality. Seeking sexual pleasure was found more in men than in women, but the response rate for this was relatively low. In terms of the level of desire of the partner' s behavior, 40% postpartum women were satisfied with not having physical contact with their husbands. In addition, women who reported the unsatisfied sexual life also answered that they did not receive enough support from their family. Support and education for sexual life is mainly taught at the hospital before postpartum women are dischaged ; however, their husbands are rarely exposed to this information. The education focuses on reproduction and sexuality, but not much on the communication and sexual pleasure.
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  • Keiko OHI, Mieko SOKABE, Emiko KISHI, Mariko TOMITA, Hisako TAKAMURA
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 155-160
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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    This study was conducted in order to understand the sexuality concerns upon resuming sex life among 69 postpartum women who naturally delivered their baby within 3 to 12 months. It was found that postpartum women were mainly concerned about physical symptoms such as the re-opening of the vagina wound and bleeding. In addition, women, even having no wound, were concerned that intercourse might be painful as a result of their painful delivery. However, this concern was not seen after their sex lives had resumed. Main concerns after resuming their sexlife were being not treated as a women by husband and becoming pregnant again. The concern of being not treated as a woman decreased when their husband showed their affection. Postpurtum women consulted with their husband and friends regarding their problems and worries. However, 27.6% reported that they could not discuss their problems about their sex life, and having no information where to find imfornation regarding these issues.
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  • Takao SANO, Ikuo WADA, Maho TAKANO, Etsuji SATOHISA
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 161-166
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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    To establish simple therapy for premenstrual syndrome using traditional herbal medicines, we reviewed 65 patients treated with such medicines. Premenstrual syndrome was diagnosed from the history. Since fluid retention caused by ovarian steroids may be important in premenstrual syndrome, the herbal medicines used were four diuretics (ryokei-jukkanto, toki-shakuyaku-san, gorei-san, and hange-byakujutsu-temmato). Ryokei-jukkanto was used for mental symptoms including anxiety and vertigo, toki-shakuyaku-san was used for lower abdominal pain, gorei-san for headache without chills, and hange-byakujutsu-temmato for headache with chills. These medicines were combined for some symptoms. Treatment was effective in 36 out of 45 patients who could be evaluated (77.8%). Among them, 34 patients received herbal medicines alone and two were also given anxiolytics. The most effective treatment was ryokei-jukkanto monotherapy in 11 patients, followed by ryokei-jukkanto plus toki-shakuyaku-san in nine patients. Ryokei-jukkanto was prescribed for 23 patients, followed by toki-shakuyaku-san for 16, gorei-san for 9, and hange-byakujutsu-temmato 3. Ten patients did not respond to initial therapy: two responded to other agents and eight were lost to follow up. When herbal medicines are used for premenstrual syndrome, psychotropic formulations are generally selected, but fluid retention induced by ovarian steroids should also be remembered.
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  • Kaoru INAFUKU
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 167-173
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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    In my previous report, I described a new diagnostic method using "Ki" for psychosomatic disease. In this paper, I will describe the practical method for the treatment of psychosmatic disease using "Ki" . Ki is a oriental traditional concept that is thonght to be a generally existing energy field that affects both mind and body. The cause of psychosomatic disease is understood as an abnormaly existing "Ki" in the body that is brought by continuous abnormal psychologic status such as anger, fear, or irritability. Psychosomatic disease can be cured by introducing the patients mind into a normal status of Ki. Detailed method will be described in the paper.
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  • Chie SATO, Yoko SATO, Eriko KANETA, Fusako MIURA, Ken NAGAI, Hiroshi N ...
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 174-179
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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    Delivery is an important passage of parenting. It is generally considered that secure delivery and parenting has a significant meaning. In order to provide a better care, anxiety upon mothers during their delivery and parenting is investigated. Subjects: 19 primiparae and 22 multiparae who had delivered in our hospital within a month between May and June in 2000, were studied during their 36th week-pregnancy and just after given a birth in hospital. Also, 14 primiparae and 11 multiparae who had delivered in our hospital within a month between July and August in 1999 were studied. This group was thus, investigated 10 months after the delivery. Methods : STAI was used as an index to reflect anxiety level. The questionnaire prepared in our hospital was filled by the same subjects in order to investigate more specific anxieties. Results : 1. Those with relatively low trait-anxiety can develop the state-anxiety under such an event as childbirth. 2. Those with relatively high trait-anxiety tend to develop high stateanxiety. 3. State-anxiety can be modified by one' s experience of abnormal pregnancy or delivery. 4. Anxiety of the labor for primiparae is caused by the unknown pain whereas that for multiparae is caused by the prior experience, which thus tends to be more specific. 5. Anxiety during the labor can be about the progress of the labor, the pain, and the newborns' condition. Every mother builds up certain anxiety during the labor even when it is observed to be safe. 6. As far as mothers of 10 months after the experience of the labor are concerned, those with relatively high trait-anxiety tend to keep the high state-anxiety. Their anxieties are described to be caused by their poor physical conditions, their spouse' s uncooperative attitude, their child' s disorder, not being able to have a confidence in parenting, or not having anyone to consult the problem. Using of STAI is effective in analyzing and grasping the situation of anxieties in delivery and parenting. The result of STAI analysis can help provide better care to those who show higher trait-anxiety or state-anxiety. It is observed that individual attention and care are necessary in the continuing passage of pregnancy, delivery, and parenting.
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  • Shunji MATSUKI, Hideyo SUGAHARA, Kazuyo ARIMA, Hisashi NARAHARA, Isao ...
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 180-184
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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    This retrospective study aimed at evaluating whether or not environmental factors such as season of birth and age are important in female patients with psychosomatic complaints. Demographic data were collected from 135 female outpatients with psychosomatic diseases. They were examined using psychological tests (Cornell Medical Index and Zung Depression Scale) and questionnaires for premenstrual syndrome. Among the younger women (<30 years old), irritability during menstruation was significantly less frequent in the autumn group. Among the thirties, irascibility was significantly more frequent in the autumn group. Among the elder women (>40 years old), insomnia was less frequent in the autumn group, but only in a trend. Zung Depression Scale points were not correlated with neither age nor season of birth. Furthermore, in the thirties, they had significantly more premenstrual complaints compared with the other groups. In conclusion, we suggest that season of birth and age may have an effect on the irritability during menstruation, insomnia and premenstrual complaints.
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  • Meikan SEKI, Masamichi SEKI, Kohji YOSHIDA, Masamichi KASHIMURA
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 185-189
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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    Nowadays, the numbers are increasing for Japanese women who have a habit of alcohol drinking. As compare to Japanese men, the women are more prone to develop alcohol abuse with fewer years of drinking habit. Heavy alcohol consumption has been associated with infertility, which could be concerned with tubal disease, ovulation failure, amenorrhoea, and dyspareunia. However, thus far little work has been done to give explanation for the relationship between drinking and infertility. In this report, two cases of female alcoholism were investigated and reported from a psychosomatic point of view. The first case is a 36-year-old nulliparous woman who has been seeking professional help for infertility, amenorrhoea, and problem with drinking. After prohibited alcohol drinking along with the treatment of hormonal and psychosomatic, the patient has since become pregnant. The second case is a 29-year-old housewife with infertility, amenorrhoea, and liver dysfunction. Psychosomatic examination has revealed that she has anxiously wanted to have a baby and has been suffering from a neurosis. In this study, we point out that the diagnosis and treatment of female alcoholism are usually difficult for those who desire for pregnancy. This is because the patients often have social and psychosomatic problems. The most important step for treating women with alcoholism is to fully understand the need for recording accurate information regarding the patient. Long-term energetic support from the aspects of somatic, mental, and gynecological seems to be essential to help patient give up alcohol abuse.
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  • Mieko SOKABE, Keiko OHI, Emiko KISHI, Yuko HAYAKAWA, Hisako TAKAMURA
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 190-196
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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    In order to examine the decision process and psychological change associated with electing to undergo an induced abortion, 40 women who had experienced abortion were studied. The main findings were as follows : (1) When participants found they were pregnant, they reported experiencing confusion, acceptance, sadness, surprise, continuity, and shame (in descending order of responses). (2) Single women had more difficulty in making a decision than married participants. (3) Participants expressed sadness, regret, guilt, and a feeling they had committed murder on their unborn babies. (4) Twenty-one participants consulted only their partner or mother, whereas the others consulted a number of people, such as partners, siblings, and/or friends. (5) There were two modes of decision-making about an abortion : voluntary type (making one's own decision and then informing others) and consulting type (consulting someone else in order to come to a decision). (6) The factors considered when deciding on an abortion were a financial problems, relationship with the partner, attending school, mother's age, and responsibility of being pregnant. (7) Participants reported feelings of giving up, determination, self-examination, relief, regret, hardship, and guilt towards having an abortion. (8) Medical professionals did not act as counselors in the decision-making process. These findings indicate that nurses need to offer psychological support to women who are faced with making a decision about whether to have an abortion.
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 197-203
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 204-208
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 209-210
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 211-212
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 213-214
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 215-216
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 217-
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 218-
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 219-
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 224-225
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 226-
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 227-
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 228-
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 229-
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 229-
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2000 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages Cover2-
    Published: December 25, 2000
    Released: January 26, 2017
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