Material Cycles and Waste Management Research
Online ISSN : 2187-4808
Print ISSN : 1883-5864
ISSN-L : 1883-5864
Volume 25 , Issue 3
Showing 1-12 articles out of 12 articles from the selected issue
Preface
Special Issues : Safety Management and 3R of Cosmetics and Pharmaceutical Products
  • Mikio Kawasaki
    2014 Volume 25 Issue 3 Pages 165-172
    Published: May 31, 2014
    Released: April 23, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Although personal care items such as cosmetics and medical products are becoming necessities for human life there is not much information regarding how to dispose of the used items. In this study, we made two investigations : (1) studied the current situation regarding the production of personal care items and (2) researched carbon and nitrogen loads eluded from personal care items and bottles collected from municipal incombustible waste streams.
     The first investigation showed that the amount of personal care items in circulation was not affected by a change in economic conditions. In addition, it was revealed that the waste amount ratio for personal care items was less than 10 % of the total waste amount. The second investigation showed that the carbon and nitrogen loads for personal care items was higher than that of incineration ash and incombustible waste residue. In order to decrease environmental loads at landfills, it was found that removal of personal care items from their bottles is the recommended treatment process.
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  • What They are. What They Contain. How their Safety is Controlled.
    Masa-aki Kaniwa
    2014 Volume 25 Issue 3 Pages 173-179
    Published: May 31, 2014
    Released: April 23, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The Pharmaceutical Affairs Law provides a definition for drugs, quasi-drugs and cosmetics and introduces a list of chemical ingredients that can be compounded for this category of products. In this paper, not only is a safety assessment performed to look at the chemical ingredients by various kinds of biological assay, but a safety control is also conducted for drugs, quasi-drugs and cosmetics through an accelerated public reporting system on cases where health has been damaged from commercially available products. In addition, collaborative activities have been undertaken by academic societies, governmental organizations and associations of manufacturers, and widely supported by a multi-field group of experts that includes doctors, chemists, biologists and manufacturers in order to establish preventive measures against health damages caused by the drugs, quasi-drugs and cosmetics category of products. The group has conducted research on epidemic health cases, following elucidation on the mechanism by which the health damages occurred and specification of the causative chemicals involved.
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  • —An Initiative of the Kawasaki Association of Pharmacists—
    Shinichi Yamamura
    2014 Volume 25 Issue 3 Pages 180-185
    Published: May 31, 2014
    Released: April 23, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Pharmacies are final providers when it comes to servicing patients for prescription drugs and over-the-counter medicines. Because of this, it is the pharmacies that bear the ultimate responsibility for proper use and discarding of the various pharmaceutical materials. A follow-up conducted in response to pharmaceutical provisions defined by the Thirteenth Revised Guidelines for Dispensing made the ramifications for such responsibility even broader, along with the assessment of efficiency and problem-findings for medical therapy. This means that pharmacies must deal with a wider range of issues related to these provisions defined for medicines, this could include adverse situations or side effects as well as understanding and tackling the related problems. This also includes how to handle unused medicines and medical wastes generated from homes, a requirement that is increasing as more and more homecare medical systems are implemented and promoted. This report introduces a campaign to collect and treat unused and otherwise discarded medicines and syringes that was conducted jointly by the Kawasaki Association of Pharmacists and the city government. The paper also discusses the future role of pharmacies with regard to medical waste management, including proper use and disposal of medicine and medical products.
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  • Kenji Ohashi
    2014 Volume 25 Issue 3 Pages 186-193
    Published: May 31, 2014
    Released: April 23, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Heightened concerns regarding global environmental problems have led consumers to make strong demands for the incorporation of sustainability into any product development or economic activity. Indeed environmental issues must be considered the most important task of businesses today, and failure to address these issues is now recognized as a major business risk to any company. In addition, various investment institutions and environmental NGOs demand that businesses disclose certain information relating to environmental issues based on the life cycle assessment (LCA) method. This paper reports on some of the practical efforts being made to reduce the environmental impact of the cosmetics industry and includes case studies that highlight LCA.
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  • Hajime Yamakawa
    2014 Volume 25 Issue 3 Pages 194-200
    Published: May 31, 2014
    Released: April 23, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This paper reports on how a recycling system for cosmetic glass bottles was first established and details the present situation and future challenges related to this initiative. Almost all of the glass bottles used for cosmetics are made of soda-lime glass, the same material used in glass bottles for drinks and foods. However, the small amount of heat-resistant glass used in these bottles creates special problems in the recycling process. For this reason, industrial associations concerned with recycling conducted a survey on the amount of heat-resistant glass bottles for cosmetics and did glass-melting experiments on them. At last they agreed to take on recycling of cosmetic glass bottles. Since their recyclability was declared, about half of the municipalities have changed their rules for sorting cosmetic glass bottles, however the number of municipalities agreeing to do so has not increased since that time. One of the reasons for this is thought to be that municipalities do not have enough knowledge on the topic; another reason may be that recyclers believe that the cosmetic glass bottles only create more of a workload for them. This paper proposes that meetings be held in order to share experiences among municipalities, highlighting those that have already changed their sorting rules for glass bottles. It also proposes that cosmetic producers should try to make their products easier to recycle.
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  • —The Challenge of Converting Waste Cosmetics into Art Material—
    Midori Sakaguchi
    2014 Volume 25 Issue 3 Pages 201-206
    Published: May 31, 2014
    Released: April 23, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This paper presents the current status and various challenges facing the cosmetics industry based on investigations and my own personal experiences while working at a cosmetics company. Many cosmetics users have a tendency to discard their make-up even before it is completely used up. This paper describes a unique recycling project called Plus Cosme Project, in which old cosmetics are being reused creatively to make art.
     As a means of raising environmental awareness about cosmetics through workshops and other activities, The Plus Cosme Project is a volunteer organization that promotes reuse of unused waste cosmetics and packaging by transforming these materials into art supplies. At present it has made great strides in its efforts to recycle cosmetics containers and packaging but the contents itself remains surplus that is still simply being discarded. Cosmetics users are often confused about this stage of the product life cycle, how to safely dispose of their old cosmetics. This paper introduces initiatives that promote the practice of reusing unused or wasted make-up and cosmetics by looking at the challenges and prospects for personal care products within the cosmetics industry. This overview is an effort to help solve these problems for the cosmetics user.
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Technical Report
  • Takashi Yamamoto, Yasufumi Kai, Hiroaki Nakauchi, Toshiaki Abuku, Yuki ...
    2014 Volume 25 Issue 3 Pages 207-214
    Published: May 31, 2014
    Released: April 23, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Treatment experiments were conducted to evaluate the applicability of a high-temperature melting treatment (GeoMelt process) as a safe treatment of polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) formulation. We started with a 10-kg-scale experiment. Subsequently, we progressed to a 1000-kg-scale experiment in which a melting furnace resembling an actual treatment system was used. Destruction efficiency values and the target levels of PCNs and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/DF) in vitrified materials, exhaust gas, and treated scrubber water samples were achieved in these runs. Therefore, we believe that PCN formulation can be treated using the GeoMelt process with an actual treatment system. We conducted a treatment experiment using an actual treatment system and confirmed the destruction of PCNs. Based on good results of the verification experiment, approx. 5,400 kg of PCN formulation stock was treated using Geomelt processing from September through December in 2012.
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Report on the 25th Annual Activities by JSMCWM : Seminor Report
Report of the JSMCWM Research Division
Activity Report from the Regional Chapter
Book Review
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