The Journal of Science of Labour
Online ISSN : 2187-2570
Print ISSN : 0022-443X
Volume 95 , Issue 2
Showing 1-2 articles out of 2 articles from the selected issue
Original Articles
  • Takiko IMAI, Miyuki TAKASE, Yoko NAKAYOSHI, Mitsuko KAWAMOTO, Kumiko Y ...
    2019 Volume 95 Issue 2 Pages 41-55
    Published: 2019
    Released: April 10, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The present study aimed to clarify the factors indispensable for the improvement of practical nursing competence based on the viewpoints of nurses with less than five years of clinical experience. This study surveyed 522 clinical nurses using anonymous paper-based, open-ended questionnaires that asked about the factors indispensable for the improvement of practical nursing competence. Of the 253 respondents, 71 nurses with less than five years of clinical experience provided valid responses, which were extracted and then analyzed using text mining. The results showed that the most frequently cited term used in the responses was “work environment,” followed by “ambition,” “knowledge,” “eagerness,” “competence,” “experience,” “patient,” and “communication”. These data were classified into the following categories: “Education and guidance system for the medical team that contributes to the motivation to learn,” “Knowledge and technical skills,” “Work environment guarantees training participation and a comfortable working relationship,” “Presence of a senior nurse who contributes to one’s learning,” and “Proactive behavior.” The findings suggest that the harmonious combination of a nurturing work environment, nurses’ personal qualities and other supporting factors is important for improving the practical competence of nurses with less than five years of clinical experience.

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Field Reports
  • Hideki OYAMA, Kazuya SUZUKI, Nobuyuki MOTEGI, Susumu SAITO, Kazuhiro S ...
    2019 Volume 95 Issue 2 Pages 56-67
    Published: 2019
    Released: April 10, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    This study investigated the effects of the use of a chair for the short nap on sleep quality, task performance, and drowsiness. The participants were 10 healthy males (average age ± SD, 22.3 ± 4.3 years). They napped for 20 minutes (12:35–12:55) after lunch in a chair (chair condition) and in a bed (bed condition) at intervals of more than 1 week. On the basis of our previous study, the back, seat, and leg rest angles in the chair to the horizontal axis were set as 30, 20, and 0 degrees, respectively. Polysomnography (EEG, EOG, and ECG) was performed, and task performance (choice reaction task and logic task) and mental work strain (MWS) were measured. The data from 6 participants (20.8 ± 1.6 years) were analyzed, who succeed- ed in the controlled nocturnal sleep for 5 hours before the day of the experiment. The frequency of waking in chair condition was significantly higher than it in bed condition (p < 0.05). For chair condition, the sleep latency was 4.7 min and total sleep time was 13.4 min; slow-wave sleep occurred for 0.42 min. For both conditions, the drowsiness score significantly decreased after the nap (p < 0.001). The results for average heart rate, choice reaction task and logic task did not have significant differences between chair and bed condition. The results show that the use of a chair for the short nap has the potential to prevent deep sleep during the nap and drowsiness after the nap.

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