Japanese Journal of Qualitative Psychology
Online ISSN : 2435-7065
Volume 17 , Issue 1
Showing 1-11 articles out of 11 articles from the selected issue
  • Ayana ANDO, Kotaro MATSUMOTO
    2018 Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 7-24
    Published: 2018
    Released: April 12, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    "Deaf culture," defined as behaviors and lifestyles of Deaf people was investigated. The author, who is a person with normal hearing (a hearing person) accompanied Deaf people and observed their daily life while taking notes. Conditions of "Deaf culture" and "hearing culture" were compared and investigated by examining the recorded notes of cases, which resulted in two main findings. The first result indicated Deaf people and hearing people perceived different objects and gave different meanings to objects in spite of being surrounded by the same environment. Secondly, interactions between Deaf and hearing people differed in their relationship to each other.
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  • From Transition to Social Withdrawal and Overcoming Critical Situations
    Hirohisa HANASHIMA
    2018 Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 25-42
    Published: 2018
    Released: April 12, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Long-term experiences of parents living with a son aged over 30 years, who was socially withdrawn and dependent were investigated. The processes from initial withdrawal to overcoming critical situations, such as domestic violence, were examined. The parents asked for help from a third person when their son’s condition could no longer be ignored, and because the parents could not understand him even after repeated communication attempts. However, it was not easy to find a good advisor. Sometimes they were criticized or hurt by disappointing responses. Especially, the mother felt a strong sense of isolation during the initial period. She often regretted and reflected on her child rearing methods. On the other hand, her husband understood her and supported her by dealing with the problems together. The parents changed after meeting a good advisor and they came to understand distinct methods of dealing with their son, felt relaxed as a result of sharing the problems, and became able to keep an appropriate distance from their son by obtaining accurate knowledge and information.
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  • A Perspective of Resilience Orientation
    Mari HIRANO, Hatsuho AYASHIRO, Hitomi NOTO, Kanae IMAIZUMI
    2018 Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 43-64
    Published: 2018
    Released: April 12, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Individual differences in resilience have previously been assessed through self-rating questionnaires or diagnostic criteria of mental disorders. For a deeper understanding of resilience and its application in clinical settings, it is important to describe unconscious aspects of resilience, which may reflect individuals’ recovery/adaptation. The aim of this study was to identify an alternative perspective of resilience, including unconscious aspects, to facilitate an understanding of individual differences in resilience. A projective method was used and 1,000 participants (aged 18–30 years) were asked to look at 12 pictures and describe how to recover from different stressful situations. In total, 12,000 responses were collected and analyzed using a qualitative categorizing technique. We identified 14 categories of resilience, as well as the concept of resilience orientation, through which these categories could be arranged in terms of type (restoration/acceptation/conversion) and target (self/other/higher). These findings suggest that resilience orientation could be an alternative to traditional monistic perspectives on individual differences in resilience.
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  • Thematic Analysis Based on the Husserlian Intentionalities
    Tsuneo WATANABE
    2018 Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 66-86
    Published: 2018
    Released: April 12, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Fifteen samples were taken from the author's "dream? diary" website to phenomenologically clarify why a dreamer can become someone else in dreams. As suggested by the Sheffield school, the author developed a table of intentionalities based on the works of Husserl, to use it in Thematic Analysis. "Real texts" were developed through "imaginative variations" of dream texts, which is a method specific to dream analysis. Phenomenological structures were extracted by comparing each dream text with its corresponding "real text" through Thematic Analysis. Then, each example of a dream was classified according to its structural features. Results indicated essential differences between examples of becoming fictive others, in which double intentional structures are reduced to single ones, and those of becoming real others, in which triple intentional structures are reduced to single ones. The phenomenological clarification of these difference was conducted using the table of intentionalities modified according to the critically reconstructed Husserlian theory of "appresentation" described by Held. Finally, the author discusses how our seemingly obvious experiences with others in the real world should be phenomenologically analyzed.
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  • Through the Life History of Nikkei Youth
    Miho UEHARA
    2018 Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 87-104
    Published: 2018
    Released: April 12, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This paper aims to examine how migrant children in Japan came to choose their current career path. I interviewed four Japanese-Brazilians and two Japanese-Bolivians and developed a model to explain the entirety of their development process, from their experiences from the stage of attending public school in Japan to the stage of employment in Japanese society. First, migrants face difficulties due to characteristics of Japanese public school culture, challenges pursuing academic activities in the Japanese language, and occasionally, the unrealistic expectation that they can return to their original country. Migrant children subsequently try to maintain their motivation by coping with the changing environment independently, so as not to lose their sense of control in the negative feedback in the Japanese school setting. Parents also support migrant children emotionally, and give them the opportunity to have a point of access to communities for their country of origin, while also motivating them to maintain their proficiency in their original language.
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  • A Case Study in Geisei Village, Kochi Prefecture, Japan
    Yoshinori NAKAGAWA, Asuka KUWANA
    2018 Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 105-124
    Published: 2018
    Released: April 12, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This qualitative study on crafters’ lives, which have attracted little attention in the literature of Mingei (folk art) and Mingu (articles of everyday use), used a twofold process for its investigation. In the first and preliminary step, the study focused on Muneyoshi Yanagi and Tsuneichi Miyamoto, two central figures in these fields, respectively, and identified three aspects of crafters’ lives that they commonly referred to: (i) being neglected by society, (ii) being connected with customers with mutual trust, and (iii) being guided by collective forces. Then, a life story interview was conducted with the traditional bamboo crafter Naoko Miyazaki. From this, there were two major findings. First, the three aspects listed above were indeed major themes in her life story. Second, she described how these aspects were associated with one another. Implications for conserving traditional cultural properties were also discussed.
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  • Through the Video Analysis of the TV Drama "Suzuki Sensei"
    Nanami KAGAWA
    2018 Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 125-142
    Published: 2018
    Released: April 12, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this paper, through the video analysis of the TV drama "Suzuki Sensei", among of this drama, teachers and students how is to clear a representation of whether is depicted as a "normal". This drama, consistently depict the theme of teachers and students that are "normal", but where the characters who were carrying the category of "normal" feels a "live Zura is" to the individual. Their piggyback "live Zura is" is aware of the category of "normal", it was intended to how it is born therefore it is he to worry about whether can remain "normal". Characters who are "norma" while feeling the "live Zura" of thing Dale also, still, is obsessed with things that can be "normal", it has been recognized as a matter of course. But, in order to be "normal" is to eliminate the reality of life, a certain category to "play" there is a need. Among these, the topic of teacher of sex, contraception of the way that has been brought to within the classroom has become an opportunity to teachers and students to outgrow the "norma". But, the ability to recover them there as well in the category of "normal" had been provided.
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  • Diversity of Experiences Using the Rashomon-Like Technique
    Reiko OTAKI
    2018 Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 143-163
    Published: 2018
    Released: April 12, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study aims to explore the experience of a young adult sibling who has a brother with mild developmental disabilities. The sample consisted of a pair of sisters who had a brother with a disability and data obtained from semi-structured interviews were analyzed with Rashomon-like technique. The results showed that it was a turning point for the sisters when their brother received the certification of a psychiatric disorder and decided to live as a person with disability. The process of obtaining the certificate changed the image of their brother and influenced them as siblings in the family in the present or future. The sisters supported their brother and connected him to society, but it was uncertain how they would support him in the future because he did not have an intellectual disability. Even though they belonged to the same family, the difference in creating a distance between their life and their brother’s life gave variety to their experience.
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  • Autonomy in Eating during Lunchtime in the "Waldkindergarten"
    Ayumi MIZUTANI
    2018 Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 164-184
    Published: 2018
    Released: April 12, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    How autonomy in eating was reflected in preschool children’s food sharing behavior? This question was investigated by observing children’s eating behavior in the "Waldkindergarten" for 20 months. Results indicated that children often shared the food in their lunchboxes and this behavior had various meanings, such as satisfying hunger, eating preferred foods, and communicating with friends. Moreover, food sharing usually happened because of physiological needs and sharing was easy when children’s desires were matching. However, children frequently gave cultural value to food or tried to get along with their friends by giving their food to friends. Furthermore, children were troubled by the meaning prioritizing, and how to satisfy different meanings. In the "Waldkindergarten", they gave and took food by amending their desires and rules because they could develop satisfactory rules by themselves according to the circumstances. Results of this study suggest that autonomy in eating was reflected in considering various meanings, and regulating when and where, with whom, and what food is shared.
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  • Reorganization of Meanings Related to Self among Indonesian Nurse Candidates in Japan
    Akiko ASAI
    2018 Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 185-204
    Published: 2018
    Released: April 12, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study examined the process by which nine Indonesian nurse candidates in Japan coped with threats to their occupational identity. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews on how participants reorganized the meanings related to themselves as a result of the challenges associated with their new status. The results indicate that participants suffered from negative feelings surrounding their demotion -- symbolized by their uniforms and name plates -- from the status of "nurse" in Indonesia, to their current status of "nurse’s aide". These negative feelings were strong among those who felt committed to the profession. To resolve these negative feelings, participants reorganized the meanings related to their identity. By accepting their status as "nurse's aides" they were able to view themselves as "candidates for the national nursing exam" and to focus on passing this exam. Our study suggests that cultural contact renders one’s occupational identity unstable and indicates that this identity is restabilized by reorganizing the meanings related to the self and changing the standards by which, and the domains in which, self-efficacy is evaluated.
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  • Jerome Bruner and the Dynamism of Confusion and Restoration
    Sousuke YOKOYAMA
    2018 Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 205-225
    Published: 2018
    Released: April 12, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In this article, I explore Jerome Bruner’s research regarding "acts of meaning". According to the evolution of narrative psychology, his ideas came be to regarded not as describing acts of meaning but, rather, as elucidating "acts providing meaning", mediated by narrative. However, his original argument involved an exploration of the principles and functions of meaning-making acts; here I explore Bruner’s acts of meaning as they were first conceived. As a conclusion, I suggest that acts of meaning correspond to the processes of confusion and restoration, which describe our minds encountered trouble defined disruption of presumptions or commonsense are restoring cracks and get back peace. In other words, these processes are "acts of possible context-exploring", whereby events beyond our understanding acquire meaning and thus become understandable. Finally, I suggest that Bruner’s acts of meaning constitute an insightful analysis relevant to attaining peace via mutual negotiations; his vision prompts a question regarding the function of the mind for people living within a particular cultural context are get it all together.
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