Fish Pathology
Online ISSN : 1881-7335
Print ISSN : 0388-788X
ISSN-L : 0388-788X
Volume 5 , Issue 2
Showing 1-15 articles out of 15 articles from the selected issue
  • Yoshiyuki TAKASE, Kaoru KOUNO, Masanao SHIMIZU
    1971 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 77-80
    Published: March 31, 1971
    Released: October 26, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Bathing effects of nifurpirinol on the intramuscular infection with Aeromonas liquefaciens in goldfish, carp and metynnis and on artificially injured skin and fins in metynnis were investigated.
    On the aeromonas infection nifurpirinol was effective by bathing at 1 ppm for 510 minutes or at 0.025ppm for seven consecutive days.
    After injuring the mortality of the fish treated with nifurpirinol by bathing at 0.05 ppm for twenty consecutive days was less than that of untreated control.
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  • Yoshiyuki TAKASE, Kaoru KOUNO, Masanao SHIMIZU
    1971 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 81-84
    Published: March 31, 1971
    Released: October 26, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Bathing effect of nifurpirinol on Ichthyophthiriasis in goldfish, pangasius, kissing gourami, blue gourami, clown loach, black molly and guppy was investigated.
    By short time bathing(510 minutes)nifurpirinol was effective at 12ppm.
    By the bathing for seven consecutive days the drug was also effective at concentrations of 0.050.2ppm.
    White spots in the treated fish disappeared on 7 days after treatment.
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  • Ikuo KIMURA, Takashi MIYAKE, Yohei ITO
    1971 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 85-99
    Published: March 31, 1971
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A spontaneous hyperplastic growth of skin which developed in Acanthogobius flavimanus collected from the Mikawa-bay area was studied preliminary from the view point of histopathology and virology.
    The hyperplastic region showed proliferating epidermal cells accompanied with relativelythin connective tissues. The lesions were characterized by giant cells which were observed among the hyperplastic epidermal cell layers.
    However, in the hyperplastic lesions less than 1mm thick, possibly in the early stage of the disease, the growth was characterized by angiomatous or fibrous connective tissues.In these connective cell layers, histiocytic or round cells were frequently observed. Even when the epidermal layer did not show too extensive proliferative growth, the basal cells changed their morphology and lost their cylindrical cell natures.
    Similar changes of the epithelial and connective tissue cells usually occurred in the transitional area between the normal skin and the papillomatous growth. Infiltrative growth of the hyperplastic epithelial cell elements into adjacent normal skin or muscular layer was not observed in any cases.
    The findings closely resembling the morphology of this disease entity have been reported in papillomatous growth of skin in flat fishes. Considering the different charcteristics of epidermis between mammal and fish, the disease of the goby was considered as one of a unique neoplastic disease found in fishes.
    Factors possibly related to the development of the papillomatous growth were also discussed in this communication.
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  • Kishio HATAI, Toshikazu HOSHINA
    1971 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 100-106
    Published: March 31, 1971
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In the summer from 1967 to 1969, 45 strains of Chondrococcus columnaris were isolated from 36 individuals of fishes suffering from columnaris disease which include eels (Anguilla japonica), rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and carp (Cyprinus carpio).
    The majority of the bacteria was isolated from the gill, but some of them were from internal organs (kidney, liver and heart). This fact suggests that the bacteria may invade in such internal organs. However, juding from isolation of bacteria on the agar plates, microscopical examination of smear preparations from and histological examination, of the internal organs it seems that the bacteria can not multiply in the internal organs. Therefore, it appears that the pathogenic function of the bacteria can come into play only on the gill and body surface which are under the aerobic environmental conditions.
    Four strains isolated from eels, and two strains each isolated from carp and rainbow trout were selected from the stock strains for artificial injection experiments with loaches (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus). The result was that two of the strains (isolated in the summer of 1967) which had been maintained for a year could not cause the disease to the loaches. The succeeding experiment was performed by the other four strains isolated in the summer of 1968. Experimental fishes were dipped in a dilute suspension of bacteria or were smeared with the bacteria on lesions made by an artificial burn, and were kept in water-flowing aquaria. The water temperature was 25 to 28°C. The result was that the loaches showed the obvious symptoms of columnaris disease after 24 to 72 hours, and died.
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  • Toshio ISHII, Yutaka MATSUMARU, Tamotsu MORIOKA, Kazuo KANAI
    1971 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 107-111
    Published: March 31, 1971
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The toxicity and distribution of 1-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-2-(6-amino-3-pyridazyl)-ethylene hydrochloride (nifurprazine hydrochloride, HB-115·HCl) were investigated in eels. The results were as follows.
    1. Single oral administration of HB-115·HCl, mixed in feed, at a dose of 267mg/kg did not show any signs of toxicity in eels. Administration of HB-115·HCl at a dose of 52.2mg/kg/day for 7 days caused no death.
    2. Eel frys were immersed in fresh-water containing various concentrations of HB-115HCl at 15°C for 2 days, and then transferred into water without HB-115·HCl. Mortalities were checked 3 days later. TLm values for eel frys caught in Japan and France were 5.5 and 6.1mcg/ml, respectively. When eel frys were kept in the water containing HB-115HCl at such a high level as 100mcg/ml for 30 minutes at 15°C, they did not show any toxic signs.
    3.The levels of HB-115·HCl in serum and various organs of eels was determined bysuperposition method using E.coli as an indicater organism. After bathing in fresh-water containing 40mcg/ml of HB-115·HCl for 30 minutes at 25°C, eels were transferred into water without HB-115·HCl and tissue levels were determined 1/4, 1/2, 1, 2, 4, 8, 24 hours later. HB-115·HCl was detected in serum and skin. Their levels descended rather rapidly with the lapse of time. HB-115·HCl was not detected in liver, kidney and muscle.
    When eels were bathed in the water containing 2mcg/ml of HB-115·HCl for 24 hours at 25°C, HB-115·HCl was detected in serum and skin immediately thereafter, but not in liver, kidney and muscle.
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  • Matajuro MATSUSHIMA, Sourokuro MATSUBARA, Toshio AI, Shinichi INOUE
    1971 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 112-115
    Published: March 31, 1971
    Released: June 17, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
  • Saburoh KUBOTA, Tokio KAMATA
    1971 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 116-119
    Published: March 31, 1971
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
  • Masaaki TAKEUCHI, Koji SHINKAI, Yoko SUZUKI
    1971 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 120-124
    Published: March 31, 1971
    Released: June 17, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The vitamin E in thirty eight commercial diets for eel culture was investigated twice.
    The average amounts are 5.54±1.97 mg% in 17 different kinds of diets for Futo stage (eel weighing more than 20 g) in May 1969, 8.11±2.79 mg% in 15 kinds Futo stage diets and 7.49±2.21mg% in 6 kinds younger eel diets in November 1970.
    The maximum vitamin E in diets for Futo stage is four to five times higher than that of minimum.
    The result of thin layer chromatography showed that the major part of vitamin E was α-tocopherol.
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  • Yasumasa SHIKAMA
    1971 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 125
    Published: March 31, 1971
    Released: October 26, 2009
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  • Kohei KOJIMA
    1971 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 126-130
    Published: March 31, 1971
    Released: October 26, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Syuzo EGUSA, Hisatsugu WAKABAYASHI, Keiko WAKABAYASHI, Kishio HATAI
    1971 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 131-142
    Published: March 31, 1971
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Shugoro KASAHARA
    1971 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 143-146
    Published: March 31, 1971
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Tokio KAMATA
    1971 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 147-153
    Published: March 31, 1971
    Released: October 26, 2009
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  • Susumu MORIKAWA
    1971 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 154
    Published: March 31, 1971
    Released: October 26, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Saburoh KUBOTA, Tokio KAMATA
    1971 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 155
    Published: March 31, 1971
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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