Fish Pathology
Online ISSN : 1881-7335
Print ISSN : 0388-788X
ISSN-L : 0388-788X
Volume 9 , Issue 2
Showing 1-16 articles out of 16 articles from the selected issue
  • Kiyokuni MUROGA, Yasuhiko JO, Tatsuo SAWADA
    1975 Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 107-114
    Published: March 30, 1975
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    As described in the previous report (MUROGA et al 1973), red spot disease (Pseudomonas anguilliseptica infection of cultured eels) occurred preferably in the Japanese eels (Anguilla japonica) to the European eels (A. anguilla), and ceased when water temperature rises to 26-27°C. In this paper, the present authors confirmed these phenomena by experimental infection.
    In the following experiments, fishes were injected intramuscularly with the organisms.
    1) Though all of the Japanese eels injected died from the experimental infection, part of the European eels (29%) survived, which suggests that the latter has lower susceptibility to the agent than the former has.
    2) From the results of infection experiments, it was made clear that Ps. anguilliseptica has relatively high pathogenicity for Ayu, loach and bluegill sunfish, but low pathogenicity for carp, crucian carp and goldfish, and (also it has) no pathogenicity for mouse.
    3) Almost all of the Japanese eels injected died from the experimental infection under 20°C or 25°C but in experiments under 27°C or 29°C few of the eels injected died.
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  • Yasuhiko JO, Kiyokuni MUROGA, Keiji ONISHI
    1975 Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 115-118
    Published: March 30, 1975
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In 1974, red spot disease (Pseudomonas anguilliseptica infection) occurred in the European eels cultured in Tokushima prefecture.
    A remarkable petechial hemorrhage in the skin of the mouth region, operculla and ventral side of the body which are known to be typical external symptoms of the disease, were not so evident and the damage was not so serious as in the Japanease eels (A. japonica).
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  • Kishio HATAI, Matajuro MATSUSHIMA, Yoshito IWAHASHI, Tadashi SASAKI, S ...
    1975 Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 119-133
    Published: March 30, 1975
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Drug levels in yellowtail(Seriola quinqueradiate)tissues following a single administration of chloramphenicol were studied. The fish used were 105-185 gr. in body weight. The test was done at about 27°C. Samples of fish were used.for analysis at each sampling.
    The fish divided into two groups, about 6 hours after administration. One group was given a diet after administration(nonfasting group)and another group (fasting group) recieved no feed during the course of experiment. Sampling for analysis was done at 2, 6, 24, 48, 72, and 120 hours after administration.
    Following a single feeding at 50 mg CP/Kg fish, yellowtail maintained levels(μg drug/gr. or ml tissue)of 16, 5-20.6, 14.4-18.6, 6.2-7.8, 6.2-6.8 and 4.5-5.0 in liver, spleen, blood, kidney and muscle, respectively, between 2-6 hours after administration.
    In the fasting group, 24 hours after administration liver, spleen and kidney still contained appreciable amount of CP and no trace of the drug were detected in muscle and blood. The drug was not detectable in kidney, liver and spleen after 48, 72 and 120 hours after admistration.
    On the contrary the drug concentrations in the tissues tended to decrease somewhat faster in nonfasting fish than in fasting fish. No traces of the drug were detected in kidney, blood and muscle, and liver and spleen after 24, 48 and 72 hours after administration respectively.
    Total nitro compound levels in liver and muscle tended to be a little higher in nonfasting fish than in fasting fish. This suggested the possibility that the diet used might contain some factors which responsed to Tsuda's reagent.
    The duration of retention of drug in the tissues was shorter in this experiment done at 27°C than that at 22°C reported previously.
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  • Kenji NAKAJIMA, Syuzo EGUSA
    1975 Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 134-139
    Published: March 30, 1975
    Released: February 10, 2010
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  • Kenji NAKAJIMA, Syuzo EGUSA
    1975 Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 140-150
    Published: March 30, 1975
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Kenji NAKAJIMA, Syuzo EGUSA
    1975 Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 151-161
    Published: March 30, 1975
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Noritomo KOMADA
    1975 Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 162-166
    Published: March 30, 1975
    Released: October 26, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The external configuration and the bones of the malformed Ayu fish (Plecoglossus altivelis) which have the second dorsal fin were examined through X-rays in the present study.
    The number of soft rays for the second dorsal fine of the malformed fish was measured as approximately 10.0 and the number of spines for the interneural spine was approximately 3.0. It is noted that the number of spines for the interhemal spine was about 4 fewer than for the normal fish. On the other hand, no difference was observed in the external configuration, the vertebral number, the number of the rays of the first dorsal fin and the anal fin, the number of the spines of the interneural spine which supports the first dorsal fin and that of the free interneural spine, between the malformed and the normal fish.
    It was also observed that the malformation of the caudal vertebra, the interhemal spine and the hemal spine of the malformed fish which have the second dorsal fin took place almost at the same time.
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  • Takashi AOKI
    1975 Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 167-173
    Published: March 30, 1975
    Released: October 26, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In vitro transfer of R factors in sterilized fish culturing pondwater was observed from the strains of Escherichia coli K-12, CSH-2 (R+) and Enterobacter cloacae 0-20 to the strain of Aeromonas liquefaciens Y61 SMγ (R-) but was not observed from A. liqufeacinns A-17 and 8L2 to E coli CSH-2 (R-). The sterilized pond water supported the growth of these bacteria.
    In vivo transfer of R factors in the intestinal tracts of carp from E. coli CSH-2 (R+) to A. liquefaciens Y62 SMγ (R-) were hardly observed.
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  • Konosuke TAKAHASHI, Toshio KAWANA, Taeko NAKAMURA
    1975 Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 174-178
    Published: March 30, 1975
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
  • Minoru SAITO, Taeko NAKAMURA, Konosuke TAKAHASHI
    1975 Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 179-186
    Published: March 30, 1975
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
  • Konosuke TAKAHASHI, Toshio KAWANA, Taeko NAKAMURA
    1975 Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 187-192
    Published: March 30, 1975
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
  • Hisatsugu WAKABAYASHI, Syuzo EGUSA
    1975 Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 193-198
    Published: March 30, 1975
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Hisatsugu WAKABAYASHI, [in Japanese], Syuzo EGUSA, [in Japanese]
    1975 Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 199-203
    Published: March 30, 1975
    Released: October 26, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Teruo MIYAZAKI, Saburoh S. KUBOTA
    1975 Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 204-212
    Published: March 30, 1975
    Released: February 01, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Naturally diseased amago (Oncorhynchus rhodurus f. macrostomus) with no external symptoms other than marked petechiae on the gill and acute death were histopathologically examined. The following histopathological changes were observed. 1) Micro infection in the epithelium of a gill lamella, 2) bacterial embolism in gill lamellae which, causing disturbance in blood circulation as well as the proliferation of branchial epithelial cells, further developed to involve the gill-filamental artery, 3) metastatic lesions in the heart with well developed bacterial colonies, marked tissue destruction and mononuclear infiltration, and 4) metastatic lesions in the liver, the spleen and the kidney with either small of large bacterial colonies and with marked tissue destruction.
    From these histopathological observations we concluded that with this type of diseased fish Aeromonas salmonicida entered the fish through branchial epithelium. We further suspected that, as an infected lesion in the gill developed into the initial septicemic lesion and a metastatic lesion in the heart into the secondary one, there appeared general dissemination, which later induced the secondary septicemia.
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  • Teruo MIYAZAKI, Saburoh S. KUBOTA
    1975 Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 213-218
    Published: March 30, 1975
    Released: February 10, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Naturally diseased amago (Oncorhynchus rhodurus f. macrostomus) with swellings of cutaneous erosions or ulcers was histopathologically examined. The following histopathological observations were made. 1) An early stage of infected lesions in the loose connective tissue of the derm showing small bacterial colonies and marked serous-fibrinous exudation, 2) infected lesions in the dence connective tissue of the derm showing degeneration of the tissue and infiltration of mononulear cells, 3) other infected lesions extending through the adipose tissue to the musculature with drastic bacterial dissemination and multiplication in the interstitial tissue, with marked tissue destruction accompanied by hemorrhage and serous-fibrinous exudation, and with mononuclear infiltration and less conspicuous neutrophilic emigration, and 4) metastatic lesions ensuing in visceral organs with small or large bacterial colonies and tissue destruction.
    From these histopathological observations, we concluded that with this type of diseased fish Aeromonas salmonicida entered the fish through the skin. Especially the lesion with swellings proved to be formed not by suppurative exudation but by the secondary liquefactive digestion of the tissue affected by bacterial infection, provided that the character of the fish nutrophilics was the same with that of the human ones. We also think that bacterial cells were generally disseminated as an infected lesion spread through the musculature and developed into a septicemic lesion, which further caused a secondary septicemia.
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  • 1975 Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 221
    Published: 1975
    Released: October 26, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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