Journal of Equine Science
Online ISSN : 1347-7501
Print ISSN : 1340-3516
Volume 29 , Issue 2
Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
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  • Yuki KIMURA, Motoki SASAKI, Kenichi WATANABE, Pramod DHAKAL, Fumio SAT ...
    Type: Note
    2018 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 33-37
    Published: 2018
    Released: July 06, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Activin is secreted from equine uterine glands and plays important roles in establishment and maintenance of pregnancy in mares. This study aimed to localize activin receptors (ActRs) IA/B and IIA/B using immunohistochemistry in the uteroplacental tissues of seven pregnant Thoroughbred mares. At the time of tissue collection, the mares were at the following days of pregnancy: 88, 120, 161, 269, 290, 313, and 335 days. We fixed the uteroplacental tissues in 4% paraformaldehyde and obtained serial sections that were subsequently stained for analysis. All four isoforms of ActR were expressed in the uteroplacental tissues, including the endometrial epithelium, uterine glands, trophoblasts, and myometrium, throughout pregnancy. Our results suggested the potential role of activin in the uteroplacental tissues.

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  • Hironaga KAKOI, Mio KIKUCHI, Teruaki TOZAKI, Kei-ichi HIROTA, Shun-ich ...
    Type: —Note—
    2018 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 39-42
    Published: 2018
    Released: July 06, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The distribution of Y chromosomal haplotypes in Japanese native horse populations was investigated to obtain genetic information on these populations. Here, 159 male/gelded horses from eight local populations were investigated, and three Y haplotypes (JHT-1, JHT-2, and JHT-3) were identified by analyzing five Y-linked loci. Five populations had only JHT-1, whereas two populations had only JHT-2. One population had JHT-1 and JHT-3. Based on the geographical distribution of these haplotypes and previously reported haplotypes for other Asian horses, JHT-1 is considered to be a major haplotype in ancestral native horses. The fixation of each haplotype suggests the influence of independent breeding and genetic drift in each population. These findings complement the results from previous genetic studies of Japanese native horses.

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  • Riccardo RINNOVATI, Barbara BIANCHIN BUTINA, Jessica BIANCHI, Armando ...
    Type: Note
    2018 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 43-46
    Published: 2018
    Released: July 06, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Branchial remnant cysts are an uncommon cause of masses of the throatlatch area in horses. Two methods of treatment have been proposed in literature, both with complications. This manuscript proposes a method (marsupialization and sclerotherapy) for the treatment of a cyst in a 1.5-year-old Arabian filly. Diagnosis was made by ultrasonographic, radiographic and endoscopic examinations, revealing an anechoic fluid-filled structure and a well-defined capsule not in communication with other structures. After emptying the cyst, the skin was sutured circumferentially to the cyst wall; it was then flushed first with a solution of ethanol and povidone-iodine, then with sterile saline. Eight months after surgery, the filly had no recurrence of the cyst and the stoma was healed.

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  • Laura CROTCH-HARVEY, Leigh-Anne THOMAS, Hilary J. WORGAN, Jamie-Leigh ...
    Type: Note
    2018 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 47-51
    Published: 2018
    Released: July 06, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Anthelmintics are used as anti-worming agents. Although known to affect their target organisms, nothing has been published regarding their effect on other digestive tract organisms or on metabolites produced by them. The current work investigated effects of fenbendazole, a benzimidazole anthelmintic, on bacteria and ciliates in the equine digestive tract and on and their major metabolites. Animals receiving anthelmintic treatment had high faecal egg counts relative to controls. Analysis was performed over two weeks, with temporal differences detected in bacterial populations but with no other significant differences detected. This suggests fenbendazole has no detectable effect on organisms other than its targets. Moreover it does not appear to make a contribution to changing the resulting metabolome.
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