Japanese Journal of Smoking Control Science
Online ISSN : 1883-3926
Volume vol.9 , Issue 04
Showing 1-2 articles out of 2 articles from the selected issue
  • -The first report based on considerations results of a questionnaire survey after enforcement of the Kanagawa Prefectural Government Ordinance on Prevention of Exposure to Secondhand Smoke in Public Facilities-
    Teruyo Saito, Eri Fukuda, Youichi Tojima, Yuko Takahashi
    2015 Volume vol.9 Issue 04 Pages 1-8
    Published: 2015
    Released: June 12, 2021
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    Abstract
    Purpose: To understand the actual status after the enforcement of the Kanagawa Prefectural Government Ordinance on Prevention of Exposure to Secondhand Smoke in Public Facilities, and to investigate factors that facilitate or inhibit the implementation of measures against passive smoking.
    Subjects and Methods: A questionnaire survey was carried out using a self-reporting questionnaire about the actual status at public facilities in Kanagawa Prefecture after enforcement of the Ordinance.
    Results: The results of the questionnaire survey of 918 facilities revealed that the rate of awareness of the Ordinance was 88.6%, overall, after 6 months of enforcement of the Ordinance, and measures against passive smoking were enhanced after the Ordinance in 38% of the facilities. Facilities at which the number of users and the sales amount remained unchanged after the Ordinance accounted for the highest proportion, 56.3%. There were significant differences according to the measures taken against passive smoking; the sales amount decreased prominently at facilities that provided separate areas for smokers. Facilities that had a plan for promoting measures against passive smoking cited the following reasons for such promotion (in descending order of frequency): “...because passive smoking may affect people’s health,” “...because of the Health Promotion Act,” and “...because of the Passive Smoking Prevention Ordinance.” At facilities where there was no such plan, the absence of the plan was explained as follows: “prevention of passive smoking is a matter of the smokers’ choice,” and “there is no space for setting up a smoking compartment.”
    Conclusion: The rate of awareness of the Ordinance was high, and the number of users and the sales amount tended to have decreased at facilities with imperfect measures in place against passive smoking, such as separation of smoking areas. It became apparent that measures against passive smoking were promoted by law enforcement and the recognition of health hazards from passive smoking, and inhibited by poor recognition of the issues of passive smoking and the need of space for setting up a smoking compartment.
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  • - The second report based on considerations from the results of measurement of individual exposures to PM2.5 in employees -
    Teruyo Saito, Eri Fukuda, Youichi Tojima, Hiroshi Yamato, Yumiko Mochi ...
    2015 Volume vol.9 Issue 04 Pages 9-15
    Published: 2015
    Released: June 12, 2021
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    Abstract
    Purpose: This study was aimed at evaluating the actual status after enforcement of the Kanagawa Prefectural Government Ordinance on Prevention of Exposure to Secondhand Smoke in Public Facilities, in terms of the measurement in the ambient air of PM2.5 and measurement of individual exposures in employees, in order to devise a better way of implementing effective measures against passive smoking at the workplace.
    Subjects and Methods: A total of 10 facilities at Kanagawa Prefecture were included in this study. Measure ments of the ambient air at each facility were carried out with a dust meter that was capable of measuring microparticles (PM2.5), and individual exposures (dust, urinary cotinine concentration) of the employees were also determined to evaluate the results in relation to the Ordinance and measures taken against passive smoking.
    Results: At facilities where measures other than a ban on smoking were adopted, both the ambient environment and individual exposures of employees exceeded the WHO criteria (25 mg/m3 or less per day). The measured urinary concentrations of cotinine in employees working at facilities where smoking was allowed or with separate smoking areas were also consistent, suggesting passive smoking in 4 of 5 cases.
    Conclusion: Based on the results of measurement of the ambient air and individual exposures (dust and urinary cotinine concentration) in employees, it is inferred that measures other than a ban on smoking are insufficient, and the policy of transition to a total ban on smoking is necessary.
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