Journal of Equine Science
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Volume 27 , Issue 1
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from the selected issue
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Original Article
  • Mohammed B. ARDO, Dauda M. ABUBAKAR
    Type: Original Article
    Volume 27 (2016) Issue 1 Pages 1-6
    Released: April 12, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A cross-sectional study was conducted on the seroprevalence of horse brucellosis using the Rose Bengal Plate Test (RBPT) and Serum Agglutination Test (SAT) on the Mambilla plateau of Taraba state, Nigeria where horses are reared under a free range management system on cattle farms. The objectives of the study were to determine the prevalence of brucella antibodies in horses as well as the distribution of the infection according to sex and age. A total of 100 horses were sampled, 25 each from four locations where horses were concentrated on the plateau: Gembu, Nguroje, Dorofi, and Mayo Ndaga. Sixty-two of the horses were males, and 38 were females. Eighty of the horses were adults, while 20 were young. All horses were reared under a free range management system together with cattle. The overall seroprevalence rate was 16 (16%) according to the RBPT and 6 (6%) according to the SAT. The seroprevalence rates were 19.40% (12/62) according to the RBPT and 6.50% (4/62) according to the SAT in the males and 10.50% (4/38) according to the RBPT and 5.30% (2/38) according to the SAT in the females. The prevalence was highest in Nguroje (8/25, 32%) followed by Gembu (5/25, 20%), Dorofi (3/25, 12%) and Mayo Ndaga (0%). Adult horses showed a seroprevalence of 18.8% (n=15) according to the RBPT and 7.5% (n=1) according to the SAT. Young horses had a seroprevalence rate of only 5% (n=1) according to the RBPT and 0% (n=0) according to the SAT. There was no statistically significance association with location, sex, and age (P>0.05). From this result, it can be concluded that brucellosis in horses on the Mambilla plateau of Taraba state, Nigeria was essentially a disease of adult horses and more prevalent in male horses than female horses. Further studies need to be conducted to determine the disease status in lowland areas of the state where horses are reared on zero grazing or are tethered and also to determine the involvement of other species and humans.
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  • Hajime OHMURA, Atsushi OKANO, Kazutaka MUKAI, Kentaro FUKUDA, Toshiyuk ...
    Type: Original Article
    Volume 27 (2016) Issue 1 Pages 7-11
    Released: April 12, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study evaluated induction of anesthesia and cardiorespiratory and anesthetic effects during maintained anesthesia with the combination of alfaxalone, medetomidine, and butorphanol. Alfaxalone (1.0 mg/kg) was administered to induce anesthesia after premedication with medetomidine (7.0 µg/kg), butorphanol (25 µg/kg), and midazolam (50 µg/kg) in six Thoroughbred horses. Intravenous general anesthesia was maintained with alfaxalone (2.0 mg/(kg∙hr)), medetomidine (5.0 µg/(kg∙hr)), and butorphanol (30 µg/(kg∙hr)) for 60 min. Electrical stimulation of the upper oral mucosa was used to assess anesthetic depth at 10 min intervals during anesthesia. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured. All horses became recumbent within 1 min after alfaxalone administration. Induction scores were 5 (best) in five horses and 4 in one horse. During the 60-min anesthesia, average HR, RR, and MAP were 35.8 ± 2.6 beat/min, 4.7 ± 0.6 breath/min, and 129 ± 3 mmHg, respectively. No horse moved with electrical stimulation; however, two horses experienced apnea (no respiration for 1 to 3 min). Recovery scores were 5 (best) in two horses and 3 in four horses. These results suggest that alfaxalone is effective for induction and maintenance of anesthesia and analgesia when combined with butorphanol and medetomidine for 60 min in Thoroughbreds. However, respiratory depression might require support.
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Note
  • Takahiro AOKI, Yuki KIMURA, Anna OYA, Akiko CHIBA, Mitsuo ISHII, Yasuo ...
    Type: Note
    Volume 27 (2016) Issue 1 Pages 13-16
    Released: April 12, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Heavy draft mares potentially have a higher risk of suffering from postpartum fever (PF) than light breed mares. The purpose of this study was to compare hematological and biochemical features between clinically healthy mares (n=40) and PF-affected mares (n=16). Mares were classified as having PF when their rectal temperature rose to >38.5°C within 96 hr of foaling. The numbers of leukocytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils and the serum magnesium level were significantly lower in PF-affected mares. The serum SAA and NEFA levels were significantly higher in PF-affected mares. Strong inflammation responses, fat mobilization associated with negative energy balance and possibly endotoxin participate in hematological and biochemical features of PF in heavy draft mares.
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  • Masataka TAKESUE, Yuki OSAKA, Masanori MURANAKA, Yoshinari KATAYAMA, H ...
    Type: Note
    Volume 27 (2016) Issue 1 Pages 17-18
    Released: April 12, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In the present study, the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of horses diagnosed with Setaria digitata cerebrospinal filariasis were analyzed by western blot. The results revealed S. digitata protein bands measuring 65, 34, 22, and 18 kDa in molecular weight. In particular, the 18 kDa band is a possible candidate for clinical immunodiagnosis on the basis of western blot findings.
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  • Mary U. EMEME, Usman S. ABDULLAHI, Anthony K. B. SACKEY, Joseph O. AYO ...
    Type: Note
    Volume 27 (2016) Issue 1 Pages 19-22
    Released: April 12, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a supplement that contains resveratrol and hyaluronic acid (RH supplement) in aged lame horses. A total of 16 horses of both sexes, aged between 15 and 22 years, weighing between 350–450 kg and showing lameness due to arthritis of the knee, hock, stifle, and fetlock joints and stiffness owing to ageing were used for the study. They comprised eight horses that were administered the RH supplement for three weeks and eight others that served as controls and were given only a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain used as carrier in the supplement. Blood samples were collected from each horse before supplementation (week 0) and at weekly intervals for the three weeks of the experiment. Biochemical parameters including creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, urea, glucose, total cholesterol, sodium, potassium, chloride, and calcium were measured by standard methods. There was a significant (P˂0.05) reduction in values of creatine kinase and glucose in the horses administered the RH supplement. It was concluded that the RH supplement may reduce the level of these biochemical parameters and their deleterious effects especially during ageing in horses.
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