The Journal of Japan Academy of Health Sciences
Online ISSN : 2433-3018
Print ISSN : 1880-0211
ISSN-L : 1880-0211
Volume 19 , Issue 2
Showing 1-6 articles out of 6 articles from the selected issue
  • 2016 Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 62-
    Published: 2016
    Released: October 06, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Yumi Akita, Naoko Iimura
    2016 Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 65-71
    Published: 2016
    Released: October 06, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We conducted semi-structured interviews with seven nurses who had recently graduated from colleges and had been working in children’s wards for less than 2 years, to examine their motivations for continuing to work as nurses. Analysis of the accumulated data led to extraction of four themes:( 1) The nurses change their way of thinking and start to learn from mistakes;( 2) They have a clear aim for the nursing care that they will provide; (3) Positive responses from children and parents help the nurses feel they are valued staff members, and( 4) The support of others incentivizes them to continue their work. It is important for newly graduated nurses to consider what they should do now to benefit their future paths, gain a clear image of the nursing care they will provide, and feel that their respective hospital wards are the right place for them.
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  • Noriko Waku
    2016 Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 72-80
    Published: 2016
    Released: October 06, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study aimed to provide an unbiased report regarding the experience of patients who underwent radical or semi-radical hysterectomy during bladder training. The participant observation and unstructured interview techniques were conducted, and the data of three patients who were included in this study were analyzed using the phenomenological approach developed by Thomas et al. As a result, eight themes were identified and demonstrated changes in the feelings and perceptions of patients who underwent radical or semiradical hysterectomy during bladder training. Emotional changes in patients may be caused by sudden functional changes in their bodies, which had worked unconsciously until the surgery. With respect to the patients’ efforts to regain the ability to normally urinate in daily life via bladder training, medical providers are recommended to focus on changes related to patient urination in both objective measurements and actual feeling. Moreover, supporting patients by focusing on their subjective recover y of normal urination is particularly important.
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  • Kenji Takaki, Yasuaki Kusumoto
    2016 Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 81-85
    Published: 2016
    Released: October 06, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    [ Purpose] We aimed to elucidate the relationship between an ankle selective muscle release operation for patients with diplegic cerebral palsy and selective motor control in the lower extremities. [Methods] Nine patients with diplegic cerebral palsy participated in this study. To assess the relationship between an ankle operation and selective motor control in the lower extremities, we compared a Selective Control Assessment of the Lower Extremity( SCALE), Modified Ashworth scale( MAS), and ankle ROM before and after the operation. We also examined the correlation of the degree of improvement in the SCALE and MAS. The SCALE can assess selective motor control, while MAS can assess the feeling of resistance. [Result] There were meaningful improvements in the SCALE, MAS, and ankle ROM. There were meaningful correlations between the degree of improvement in the SCALE and MAS. [Conclusion] The ankle operation and postoperative physical therapy improved the SCALE, MAS, and ankle ROM. The feeling of resistance with dorsiflexion of the ankle joints was related to improvement of selective motor control in the lower extremities.
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  • Takuya Hiroshima, Osamu Nitta
    2016 Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 86-91
    Published: 2016
    Released: October 06, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    It has been observed there is height difference on the left and right sides of the pelvis in sitting position of one-sided hip flexion limitation cases. However, there is little report on the relationship between the left and right height difference of the pelvis and one-sided hip flexion limitation in sitting position. Thus, this study investigated the relationship of the height difference between the left and right pelvis and the one-sided hip flexion limitation cases in sitting position. The subjects were 9 individuals with one side total hip arthroplasty. In sitting position, subjects were photographed from frontal plane. From the taken image, the lateral pelvic tilt angle was measured using rysis( sitting posture measurement software). Then, the left and right height difference of anterior superior iliac spine( ASIS) was calculated[ ASIS height difference=ASIS distance×sin( the lateral pelvic tilt angle)]. Correlation analysis between ASIS height difference and 80- the limited side hip flexion angle was performed. As a result, a strong correlation between the limited side hip flexion angle and ASIS height difference( r=0.8, p<0.05) was found. This study showed that one-sided hip flexion limitation leads to the elevation of the limited side pelvis in sitting position. There is a possiblity that one-sided hip flexion limitation in sitting position contributes to the concentration of pressure on one side of the ischium.
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  • Hidetake Hara, Hiroshi Muraishi, Hiroki Matsuzawa, Yasuo Nakajima
    2016 Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 92-96
    Published: 2016
    Released: October 06, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Traditionally, it has been difficult to visualize acute cerebral stroke from images produced by X-ray computed tomography( CT). We have recently developed a phantom that simulates acute cerebral stroke. We attempted to visualize an acute-stage cerebral infarction by using Dual-Energy CT( DECT) to obtain composite imaging of this phantom. Composite images were created by using DECT voltages combination at 80 kV/Sn 140 kV, 100 kV/Sn 140 kV, 140 kV/80 kV, were obtained in such a way that the sum of the assigned weight coefficients became 1.0. Calculation of the CNR values allowed us to evaluate the visualization of acute-stage cerebral infarction. The CNR value of composite images were the highest at low energy side 0.5, high energy side 0.5, under 80 kV/Sn 140 kV and 140 kV/80 kV, and at low energy side 0.6, high energy side 0.4, under 100 kV/Sn 140 kV. The CNR values of composite images at weight coefficients between 0.4 and 0.6 were significantly higher than those obtained for all other created coefficients images. Therefore, the optimal conditions for visualizing acute cerebral stroke were achievable.
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