Japanese Journal of Biofeedback Research
Online ISSN : 2432-3888
Print ISSN : 0386-1856
Volume 40 , Issue 1
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from the selected issue
  • Hiroshi HAGIWARA
    Type: Article
    2013 Volume 40 Issue 1 Pages 1-2
    Published: April 25, 2013
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (204K)
  • Masaaki MAKIKAWA
    Type: Article
    2013 Volume 40 Issue 1 Pages 3-9
    Published: April 25, 2013
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Now Japanese science and technology has certainly become the front-runner in the world, and many industrial companies are in deep trouble to produce something new, because Japanese customers become rich and they don't want anything except long healthy life. Then many industrial companies want to expand their own commercial field to health, medical and welfare field, which is "the best interest of mankind". At least almost all companies have strong demands to increase the value of their own products to "User-friendly" and "Easy to use" one, utilizing the results of life sciences. In this paper "Health Innovation" to foster an industrial core in next generation is discussed.
    Download PDF (12525K)
  • Sayaka MATSUMOTO, Haruo SAKUMA
    Type: Article
    2013 Volume 40 Issue 1 Pages 11-19
    Published: April 25, 2013
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Competitive situations can serve as social psychological stressors in our daily lives, as they create successful experiences (i.e., winning) or failures (i.e., losing) depending on, or in spite of, our efforts. An electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded during a cued reaction time task consisting of 40 trials under both solo and competitive situations, and the fast Fourier transform analysis was performed to compute absolute and relative EEG alpha power values, which were used to investigate the participants' responses to social psychological stress due to competitive situations by examining the effects of task performance and time course on EEG alpha power. The alpha power obtained in competitive conditions was generally reduced compared with that obtained in solo conditions. The alpha power of later trials was also generally larger than that of earlier trials in both conditions. Participants in the lowest group of task performance had a smaller alpha power in the right frontal area in earlier trials in competitive conditions compared with earlier trials in solo conditions, whereas other participants exhibited any effect of neither condition nor time course in the same area. These results suggest that competitive situations increase tension, which in turn decreases, even while the situation continues to be competitive. In addition, it is suggested that individuals with a lower task performance may become anxious relatively early under competitive situations.
    Download PDF (3399K)
  • Yuichiro NAGANO
    Type: Article
    2013 Volume 40 Issue 1 Pages 21-23
    Published: April 25, 2013
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (3741K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2013 Volume 40 Issue 1 Pages 33-
    Published: April 25, 2013
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (3719K)
feedback
Top