Japanese Journal of Biofeedback Research
Online ISSN : 2432-3888
Print ISSN : 0386-1856
Volume 17
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
  • Iwao Saito, Nobuyoshi Yashiro, Satoru Okuse, Yasuo Saito, Hiromitsu Ki ...
    Type: Article
    1990 Volume 17 Pages 1-7
    Published: May 13, 1990
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Present study was performed to elucidate whether EMG biofeedback assisted relaxation training might have any influence on painful respiratory muscle groups and respiratopry function, especially vital capacity(VC). Among 25 subjects who were painful in respiratory muscles, 18 subfects were incorporated into this training program. Apparatus : The apparatus for EMG-BFT and Spirometry were used. Procedure : The targets were intercostal muscles & abdominal muscle groups, diaphragmatic muscle, and shoulder, neck and back muscle groups. The numbers of relaxation training ranged 3-26(mean : 9). Two of each 7 minutes muscle relaxation training were performed. Respiratory function was examined before and after each relaxation training. Paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results : 1) EMG level was 5.2±4.6μV before EMG-BFT, and 4.12±3.2μV after EMG-BFT (p<0.05). 2) VC was 1877.4±716.0ml bofore EMG-BFT, and 2043.7±694.2ml after EMG-BFT (p<0.001). 3) There was no relationship between the me-an decreased EMG level and the mean increasd vital capacity. 4) The quality of life was examined with Hugh-Jones criteria which was usually applied for evaluation of dyspea. The subjects became more active after EGM biofeedback relaxation (p<0.05). Summary : It was suggested that EMG level in painful respiratory muscle groups with increase of vital capacity and improvement of physical activity.
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  • Hiroto Okouchi
    Type: Article
    1990 Volume 17 Pages 8-14
    Published: May 13, 1990
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Effects of training tasks and feedback on the control of peripheral skin temperature were examined. Eight male undergraduate students participated in 12 training sessions under 3 conditions : maximum amount task (MAT), maximum frequency task (MFT), and no feedback (NFB) conditions. Subjects were asked to increase temperature of right index finger as large as possible and were presented amount related feedback and monetary reward under the MAT condition, while they were asked to increase it as long as possible and were presented time (frequency) related feedback and monetary reward on the MFT condition. Under the NFB condition, the procedure was almost the same as that under the MAT condition except feedback stimulus was not presented. Skin temperature of 5 subjects increased after 5 trainihg sessions. There was not any clear differences of skin temperature change between 2 training tasks. Feedback had interference effects on performances of skin temperature control. That is, in all subjects except 1,performances under the MAT and MFT conditions were inferior to that under the NFB condition during the last 7 sessions. Performances were related with verbally reported relaxation.
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  • Kenshi Kawahara, Koji Yanagisawa, Shiro Ogawa, Yoshiko Nisimura, Chuji ...
    Type: Article
    1990 Volume 17 Pages 15-20
    Published: May 13, 1990
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Palmar hyperhidrosis due to mental sweating activity was treated with biofeedback method which was devised newly. Subjects consist of five neuroses and psychosomatic diseases suffering from excessive sweating. A biofeedback apparatus (For-Rest Model 1) which apllied capacitance-hygrometry was used. This system can record sweating volume directry and continuosly. Patients were able to moniter visually their sweating respones by watching recorder. The effects of sweating reduction was recognized on three of five patients. One case showed improvement in her hands' tremor after biofeedback training. These results suggest the possibility that this biofeedback system may be effctive for control of mental sweating, with resulting relaxation.
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  • Makoto Ikezuki, Kotaro Harano, Shoji Yamaguchi
    Type: Article
    1990 Volume 17 Pages 21-25
    Published: May 13, 1990
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The present study investigated what influence the practices of autogenic training and breathing adjustment training given as a self-control training will exert upon performing the task of decreasing SCL. As a result of this study, the following facts have been clarified : 1. The more sessions of training for self-control the subjects have been given, the move effectively they can perform the task of decreasing SCL in biofeedback training. 2. The higher the subjects'SCL, the larger the rate of their SCL change during their biofeedback training.
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  • Yoshiki Tominaga
    Type: Article
    1990 Volume 17 Pages 26-32
    Published: May 13, 1990
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Three cerebral palsied subjects with spasticity were given multi-site kinetic biofeedback (BF) training in a standing posture. A multi-site kinetic biofeedback system included handrails with strain gauge mounted isometric force sensors, and plates with linear potentiometers and springs for measurement of hip and knee displacement in the horizontal direction. From the displacement data and a known stiffness value of the spring, force was calculated. An experimental design used was an A-B-A time-series(pre-nofeedback, multi-site kinetic BF, post-nofeedback). In the multi-site kinetic BF condition, a body stick figure of a standing man whose posture could change by given force signals from the handrails, and hip and knee plates was displayed on the CRT of a micro-computer. The hands, knees, and hips of the stick figure were marked with circles. A posture of the stick figure could alter depending on the force created by the postural changes of the subject himself. For example, if the subject lean backward, width of the hip and legs became wider. If there was knee flexion, the distance between the knees in the stick figure widened. Forces on the handrails changes the position of the hand in the stick figure. The subjects were instructed to have a good body stick figure on the CRT by maintaining body coordination. At the same time, binary feedback was used to monitor overall success during training. For each of the hands, knees, and hips, a mean force was computed for the pre-nofeedback condition as a threshold value. This mean value was used as a criterion of binary feedback. During training, the color of the circles changed to provide binary feedback information (white = success, red = failure). During the time all six criteria were met, a beep sounded repeatedly. Results showed that all subjects improved his/her postural controlling capacity due to the training of multi-site kinetic BF. The multi-site kinetic BF as shown in this experimental paradigm seems to be a viable method for training of gross motor systems in cerebral palsied children.
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  • Masahiro Kodama
    Type: Article
    1990 Volume 17 Pages 33-36
    Published: May 13, 1990
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Yoshio Inamori, Ichiro Matsunaga, Junzo Tsujita
    Type: Article
    1990 Volume 17 Pages 37-38
    Published: May 13, 1990
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1990 Volume 17 Pages 65-66
    Published: May 13, 1990
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (237K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1990 Volume 17 Pages 67-
    Published: May 13, 1990
    Released: May 23, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (187K)
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