Spine Surgery and Related Research
Online ISSN : 2432-261X
ISSN-L : 2432-261X
Volume 3 , Issue 2
Showing 1-14 articles out of 14 articles from the selected issue
REVIEW ARTICLE
  • Masayuki Ishikawa, Makoto Nishiyama, Michihiro Kamata
    2019 Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages 113-125
    Published: April 27, 2019
    Released: April 27, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: October 10, 2018
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Introduction: Controversies still exist in the surgical indications and outcomes of selective thoracic fusion (STF) for a primary thoracic curve with a compensatory large lumbar curve (King-Moe type II/Lenke 1C curve) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Issues of the greatest concern regarding this curve type include curve criteria that indicate STF to prevent postoperative coronal decompensation and postoperative radiographic outcomes, including curve correction, coronal balance, and thoracolumbar kyphosis, after STF.

    Methods: This review comprehensively documents the issues raised in the literature regarding surgical indications and radiographic outcomes of STF for King-Moe type II/Lenke 1C curve in AIS.

    Results: Studies suggest that radiographic curve criteria indicating STF for this curve type include the preoperative dominance of the thoracic curve to the lumbar curve in the Cobb angle and the characteristics of the lumbar curve in magnitude and flexibility. Studies warn the need for a careful clinical evaluation of the thoracic and lumbar rotational prominences. Documented radiographic outcomes of importance include the postoperative behavior of the unfused lumbar curve, coronal or sagittal decompensation after STF, and factors associated with these issues.

    A comprehensive review of the literature suggests that the use of a segmental pedicle screw construct and better instrumented thoracic curve correction achieve better spontaneous lumbar curve correction. Although the causes of postoperative coronal decompensation remain multifactorial, preoperative coronal decompensation to the left and an inappropriate selection of the lowest instrumented vertebra are consistently reported to be the major causative factors.

    Conclusions: STF has been validated in general for the treatment of King-Moe type II or Lenke 1C curve in AIS; however, controversies remain regarding the surgical indications and outcomes.

    Long-term impacts of residual lumbar curve, coronal decompensation, and mild thoracolumbar kyphosis on clinical outcomes after STF, along with optimal indications and strategy for STF, should further be assessed.

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  • Venkata Ramakrishna Tukkapuram, Abumi Kuniyoshi, Manabu Ito
    2019 Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages 126-135
    Published: April 27, 2019
    Released: April 27, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: October 10, 2018
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Cervical spine instrumentation is evolving with an aim of stabilizing traumatic and non-traumatic cases of the cervical spine with a beneficial reduction, better biomechanical strength, and a strong construct with minimal intraoperative, as well as immediate and late postoperative complications. The evolution from interspinous wiring till cervical pedicle screws has changed the outlook in treating the cervical spine pathologies with maximum 3D stability, decreasing the duration of postoperative immobilization and hospital stay. Some complications associated with the use of cervical pedicle screw can be catastrophic. This review article discusses the morphometry of cervical pedicle; indications, biomechanical superiority, tricks, and pitfalls of cervical pedicle screw; complications and technical advancements in targeting safe surgery; and future directions of cervical pedicle screw instrumentation.

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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
  • Ryoma Aoyama, Tateru Shiraishi, Junichi Yamane, Ken Ninomiya, Kazuya K ...
    2019 Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages 136-140
    Published: April 27, 2019
    Released: April 27, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: August 25, 2018
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to elucidate the duration for which the dural tube continues to expand after muscle-preserving cervical laminectomy and the extent to which the expansion affects surgical outcomes.

    Methods: We analyzed 83 patients with cervical myelopathy who underwent muscle-preserving selective laminectomy of three consecutive laminae between C4 and C6. On the lateral radiographs, parameters considered were C2-7 Cobb angles, range of flexion-extension neck motions, and C2-7 sagittal vertical axis. Neck alignment was classified into four types with lateral radiographs. Anteroposterior (AP) diameter of the dural tube was measured at mid-level of the C5 vertebral body on T2 sagittal image. Expansion ratio (ER) was defined as the extent of expansion at a particular time divided by the final extent of expansion of the dural tube diameter. Operative outcomes were examined using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores.

    Results: The mean age was 62.3 years, and the mean follow-up period was 2 years and 9 months. AP diameter of the dural tube had been expanding until 1-year after surgery. ER in cases with kyphosis was lower at 6 months than that in cases without kyphosis, indicating that the speed of dural expansion was slower in cases with kyphosis. There was no correlation between the extent of expansion of the dural tube and neurological recovery.

    Conclusions: The dural tube continued to expand for approximately 1-year after surgery. The dural tube of patients with kyphosis slowly expanded possibly because of the hardness of the dura mater. A small extent of dural expansion does not necessarily indicate bad surgical outcomes.

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  • Daisuke Numaguchi, Keiji Wada, Mitsuru Yui, Ryo Tamaki, Ken Okazaki
    2019 Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages 141-145
    Published: April 27, 2019
    Released: April 27, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: August 25, 2018
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Introduction: The incidence of remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) in patients with a dural tear during spinal surgery is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH and the causative factors in these patients.

    Methods: Two hundred and thirty-nine patients underwent spinal surgery at our institution between March 2015 and September 2016. Eleven of these patients needed dural suturing intraoperatively. All patients underwent CT of the head on the first postoperative day and were categorized according to whether they had RCH or not. The mean values for the amount of intraoperative bleeding, maximum perioperative blood pressure, postoperative drainage volume, and complaints of headache during the first 24 h postoperatively were compared between the two groups using the Welch's two-sample t-test and Fisher's exact test. The follow-up duration was 12 months.

    Results: There were four patients in the RCH group and seven in the non-RCH group. The incidence of RCH was 36.4%. There were three cerebellar hemorrhages and one interhemispheric fissure hemorrhage in the RCH group. The mean intraoperative bleeding volume was 284 mL in the RCH group and 569 mL in the non-RCH group. The mean respective values for maximum perioperative blood pressure and postoperative drainage volume were 132 mmHg and 547 mL in the RCH group and 144 mmHg and 567 mL in the non-RCH group; none of the differences was statistically significant. However, complaints of headache in the first 24 h postoperatively were significantly more common in the RCH group than in the non-RCH group (100% vs. 14.3%; p = 0.01). All patients with intracranial bleeding had recovered 3 months after surgery.

    Conclusions: The incidence of RCH following a dural tear during spinal surgery was 36.4%. There was a significant association between RCH and increased reporting of headache during the first 24 h postoperatively.

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  • Tsuyoshi Goto, Toshinori Sakai, Kosuke Sugiura, Hiroaki Manabe, Masato ...
    2019 Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages 146-150
    Published: April 27, 2019
    Released: April 27, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: August 25, 2018
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Introduction: In past biomechanical studies, repetitive motion of lumbar extension, rotation, or a combination of both, frequently seen in batting or pitching practice in baseball, shooting practice in soccer, and spiking practice in volleyball, have been considered important risk factors of lumbar spondylolysis. However, clinically, these have been identified in many athletes performing on a running track or on the field, which requires none of the practices described above. The purpose of this study was to verify how much impact running has on the pathologic mechanism of lumbar spondylolysis.

    Methods: In study 1, 89 consecutive pediatric patients diagnosed with lumbar spondylolysis at a single outpatient clinic between January 2012 and February 2017 were retrospectively analyzed. In study 2, motion analysis was performed on 17 male volunteers who had played on a soccer team without experiencing low back pain or any type of musculoskeletal injury. A Vicon motion capture system was used to evaluate four movements: maximal effort sprint (Dash), comfortable running (Jog), instep kick (Shoot), and inside kick (Pass).

    Results: In study 1, 13 of the 89 patients with lumbar spondylolysis were track and field athletes. In study 2, motion analysis revealed that the hip extension angle, spine rotation angle, and hip flexion moment were similar in Dash and Shoot during the maximum hip extension phase. The pelvic rotation angle was significantly greater in the kicking conditions than in the running conditions.

    Conclusions: Kinematically and kinetically, the spinopelvic angles in Dash were considered similar to those in Shoot. Dash could cause mechanical stress at the pars interarticularis of the lumbar spine, similar to that caused by Shoot, thus leading to spondylolysis.

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  • Yusuke Hori, Shinji Takahashi, Hidetomi Terai, Masatoshi Hoshino, Hiro ...
    2019 Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages 151-156
    Published: April 27, 2019
    Released: April 27, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: August 25, 2018
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Introduction: Despite ongoing improvements in both dialysis and surgical techniques, spinal surgery in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) is a challenge to surgeons because of the high mortality rate. However, no previous studies have examined clinical outcomes after lumbar surgery in HD patients. The purpose of this study is to compare clinical outcomes and complication rates after lumbar spinal surgery in patients with or without hemodialysis.

    Methods: This retrospective, matched cohort study was conducted to compare surgical outcomes between HD vs non-HD patients who underwent lumbar surgery at our hospital. Controls were individually matched to cases at a ratio of 1:2. Clinical outcomes, complications, and mortality rates were compared between the two groups.

    Results: Twenty-nine patients in the HD group and 57 in the non-HD group were included in the current study. Five patients in the HD group died during the follow-up period, whereas no patients died in the non-HD group (mortality rate, 17.2% vs. 0%, P = 0.003). Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores were significantly less improved in the HD group than in the non-HD group (11.9 vs. 14.2 preoperatively, P = 0.001; 19.9 vs. 25.1 at final follow-up, P < 0.001). Five patients underwent repeat surgery in the HD group, which was significantly higher than the non-HD group (17.2% vs. 3.5%, P = 0.041).

    Conclusions: The current study indicates that patients undergoing HD had poor outcomes after lumbar spinal surgery. Moreover, 5 of 29 patients died within a mean 2.4-years follow-up. The indications for lumbar spine surgery in HD patients must be carefully considered because of poor surgical outcomes and high mortality rate.

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  • Yuyu Ishimoto, Mamoru Kawakami, Elizabeth Curtis, Cyrus Cooper, Nichol ...
    2019 Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages 157-162
    Published: April 27, 2019
    Released: April 27, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: August 25, 2018
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Introduction: Musculoskeletal diseases and spinal malalignment are associated with poorer quality of life (QOL) in the elderly. However, to date, few general population cohort studies have focused on these conditions together. Our objectives were to clarify the associations between musculoskeletal degenerative diseases and/or spinal malalignment with QOL measures in a group of Japanese older adults.

    Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we analyzed data from 334 individuals recruited from the local population (120 men, 214 women; mean age 62.7 years; range 40-75). Low back pain (LBP) was assessed by questionnaire, and lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) was diagnosed using a validated lumbar spinal stenosis support tool. Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) was diagnosed by the presence of clinical knee pain plus radiographic KOA. Spinal radiographs were used to assess the degree of lumbar lordosis (LL) and sagittal vertical alignment (SVA). QOL assessment was performed using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). A score of 12 was used as a cut-off point for poor QOL.

    Results: Overall, 107 (32.0%) participants had an ODI > 12 (cases), and the remaining 227 individuals were designated controls. LBP, LSS, KOA, and LL were associated with poorer QOL, both in basic models and models adjusted for age, sex, and BMI. Associations persisted after adjustment for other musculoskeletal outcomes.

    Conclusions: In a free-living Japanese population, the poor QOL odds are increased by LBP, LSS, KOA, and certain spinal radiographic features, loss of LL, and increased SVA. Poor QOL odds were greatest in those diagnosed with LSS or KOA. From spinal radiographs, decreased LL and increased SVA were also predictors of poor QOL.

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  • Izaya Ogon, Tsuneo Takebayashi, Hiroyuki Takashima, Tomonori Morita, M ...
    2019 Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages 163-170
    Published: April 27, 2019
    Released: April 27, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: October 10, 2018
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) enables detailed analysis of the composition of muscular fat tissues such as intramyocellular lipids (IMCLs) and extramyocellular lipids (EMCLs). The aim of this study was to analyze the EMCL and IMCL of the multifidus muscle (Mm) using MRS in chronic low-back pain (CLBP) patients and identify their possible correlations with age, body mass index (BMI), low-back pain (LBP) visual analog scale (VAS) score, cross-sectional area (CSA), and fat infiltration of the Mm.

    Methods: Eighty patients (32 men and 48 women; mean age, 64.7 ± 1.3 years; range, 22-83 years) with VAS scores >30 mm for CLBP were included. We analyzed the gender difference and the possible correlations of age, BMI, LBP VAS, CSA, and fat infiltration of the Mm with the IMCL and EMCL of the Mm. The subjects were divided into five groups as per their age range: < 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, and 80s. We also analyzed the EMCL and IMCL of the Mm as per the fat infiltration classification.

    Results: CSA was larger in the male group, EMCL was higher in the female group, and there was no significant difference in IMCL between the female and male groups. There was a significant positive correlation of EMCL with age (r = 0.33, p < 0.01) and BMI (r = 0.42, p < 0.01) and a significant negative correlation of EMCL with CSA (r = −0.61, p < 0.01). There was a significant positive correlation between IMCL and VAS (r = 0.43, p < 0.01). The EMCL and CSA of the Mm decreased with age, whereas fat infiltration increased with age.

    Conclusions: These results suggest that EMCL could indicate Mm degeneration associated with aging, and IMCL could be an effective objective indicator of CLBP. The EMCL and IMCL of the Mm may be useful prognostic markers in rehabilitation strategies.

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  • Koji Tamai, Hidetomi Terai, Akinobu Suzuki, Hiroaki Nakamura, Kei Wata ...
    2019 Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages 171-177
    Published: April 27, 2019
    Released: April 27, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: October 19, 2018
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Introduction: Approximately 3% of osteoporotic vertebral fractures develop osteoporotic vertebral collapse (OVC) with neurological deficits, and such patients are recommended to be treated surgically. However, a proximal junctional fracture (PJFr) following surgery for OVC can be a serious concern. Therefore, the aim of this study is to identify the incidence and risk factors of PJFr following fusion surgery for OVC.

    Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed registry data collected from facilities belonging to the Japan Association of Spine Surgeons with Ambition (JASA) in 2016. We retrospectively analyzed 403 patients who suffered neurological deficits due to OVC below T10 and underwent corrective surgery; only those followed up for ≥2 years were included. Potential risk factors related to the PJFr and their cut-off values were calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis.

    Results: Sixty-three patients (15.6%) suffered PJFr during the follow-up (mean 45.7 months). In multivariate analysis, the grade of osteoporosis (grade 2, 3: adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2.92; p=0.001) and lower instrumented vertebra (LIV) level (sacrum: aOR 6.75; p=0.003) were independent factors. ROC analysis demonstrated that lumbar bone mineral density (BMD) was a predictive factor (area under curve: 0.72, p=0.035) with optimal cut-off value of 0.61 g/cm2 (sensitivity, 76.5%; specificity, 58.3%), but that of the hip was not (p=0.228).

    Conclusions: PJFr was found in 16% cases within 4 years after surgery; independent risk factors were severe osteoporosis and extended fusion to the sacrum. The lumbar BMD with cut-off value 0.61 g/cm2 may potentially predict PJFr. Our findings can help surgeons select perioperative adjuvant therapy, as well as a surgical strategy to prevent PJFr following surgery.

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  • Hirotsugu Omi, Taito Itabashi, Toshihide Nagaoki, Tetsuya Ogawa, Takas ...
    2019 Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages 178-182
    Published: April 27, 2019
    Released: April 27, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: November 10, 2018
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Introduction: Fluoroscopy-guided selective nerve root block (SNRB) is useful for the diagnosis and treatment of nerve root pain. However, the procedure exposes the surgeon's hands to radiation. Therefore, the purpose of this randomized prospective study was to assess the radiation exposure per unit time of the surgeon's fingers during performance of a lumbosacral SNRB and to calculate the annual exposure time limits for four hand-protection methods.

    Methods: We prospectively recruited patients scheduled for an SNRB and measured the radiation exposure using a ring-type passive radiation dosimetry device attached to the distal phalanx of the index finger of the hand performing the needle placement. Patients were randomly divided into the following four groups: a) the direct exposure group, b) the 0.03-mmPb glove group, c) the 0.25-mmPb glove group, and d) the forceps group (in which the needle was held using forceps such that the fingers did not enter the irradiation field).

    Results: We recruited 40 consecutive patients (16 men and 24 women), with a mean age of 69 years. In all cases, SNRB was successfully performed without complications. The average exposure per hour for each of the four groups was as follows: 0.67 ± 0.56 mSv/s in the direct exposure group, 0.12 ± 0.07 mSv/s in the 0.03-mmPb glove group, 0.019 ± 0.02 mSv/s in the 0.25-mmPb glove group, and 0.001 ± 0.004 mSv/s in the forceps group (p < 0.01). The average annual exposure time limit was 12.4 min in the direct exposure group, 67.9 min in the 0.03-mmPb glove group, 7.5 h in the 0.25-mmPb glove group, and 5.0 days in the forceps group.

    Conclusions: Using a radiation reduction glove or forceps greatly decreased the radiation exposure and increased the annual exposure time limit for SNRB.

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CASE REPORT
  • Hiroaki Manabe, Toshinori Sakai, Fumitake Tezuka, Kazuta Yamashita, Yo ...
    2019 Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages 183-187
    Published: April 27, 2019
    Released: April 27, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: May 29, 2018
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Introduction: C4 radiculopathy due to cervical spondylosis has rarely been reported as a cause of hemidiaphragmatic paralysis.

    Case Report: A 70-year-old man presented with hemidiaphragmatic paralysis due to right C3-C4 foraminal stenosis. The diagnosis was made preoperatively from findings on plain chest radiographs, respiratory function tests, and electrophysiologic tests. All the patient's test results and symptoms improved immediately after surgical treatment for cervical spondylosis.

    Conclusions: Although it may be difficult to make a correct diagnosis based only on radiological findings at the cervical spine, we should be aware of the existence of this entity and pay close attention to chest radiographs.

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  • Ryunosuke Fukushi, Satoshi Kawaguchi, Goichi Watanabe, Keiko Horigome, ...
    2019 Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages 188-192
    Published: April 27, 2019
    Released: April 27, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: May 29, 2018
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Introduction: Vertebral fractures associated with ankylosing spinal disorders pose significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Notably, the ankylosed spine remains in ankylosis after fracture treatment, and the underlying susceptibility to further fractures still remains. Nevertheless, information is scarce in the literature concerning patients with ankylosing spinal disorders who have multiple episodes of vertebral fractures.

    Case Report: Case 1 involves an 83-year-old male patient with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (ankylosis from C2 to L4) who had three episodes of vertebral fractures. The first episode involved a C5-C6 extension-type fracture, which was treated with posterior segmental screw instrumentation. Five years later, the patient sustained a three-column fracture at the L1 vertebra following another fall. The fracture was managed with percutaneous segmental screw instrumentation. One year and two months postoperatively, the patient fell again and had a refracture of the healed L1 fracture. The patient was treated with a hard brace, and the fracture healed. Case 2 involves a 76-year-old female patient with ankylosing spondylitis (ankylosis from C7 to L2) who had two episodes. At the first episode, she suffered paraplegia due to a T8 vertebra fracture. The patient was treated with laminectomy and posterior segmental screw instrumentation. The patient recovered well and had all the hardware removed at 10 months postoperatively. Five years later, she had another fall and suffered a three-column fracture at L1. The patient underwent percutaneous segmental screw instrumentation. The patient required revision surgery with L1 laminectomy and L1 right pediclectomy for persistent right inguinal pain. At one-year follow-up, the patient recovered well, and the fracture healed.

    Conclusions: The abovementioned cases show that an age older than 75 years and a long spinal ankylosis from the cervical spine to the lumbar spine may serve as risk factors for the repetition of vertebral fractures associated with ankylosed spinal disorders.

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CLINICAL CORRESPONDENCE
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