Journal of Cookery Science of Japan
Online ISSN : 2186-5787
Print ISSN : 1341-1535
ISSN-L : 1341-1535
Volume 28 , Issue 4
Showing 1-14 articles out of 14 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese]
    1995 Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 217
    Published: November 20, 1995
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Tomoko Kimura, Yoko Fukuya, Mieko Kagaya, Tatsuyuki Sugahara
    1995 Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 218-223
    Published: November 20, 1995
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Chicken liver washed by ultrasonication for 10 min was cured in 0,2,4 and 6% sodium chloride added to sake lees paste at 5°C for 10 days. The change in the physical properties and palatability of the chicken liver during this period were examined.
    The results obtained were as follows:
    1) The sodium chloride, alcohol and total sugar contents were increased, and the water content and the pH value were decreased with higher concentration of sodium chloride in sake lees paste, and longer time cured for chicken liver. The color tones of cured chicken liver were also different according to the concentration of sodium chloride in sake lees paste.
    2) Desirable preparing condition of cured chicken liver was the curing for 7 days in sake lees paste containing 2-4% sodium chloride. The desirable cured chicken liver containing 0.9-1.7% sodium chloride, had significantly higher value of hardness as compared with the chicken liver cured for 7 days, in the sodium chloride-free paste and had an excellent taste with a savor of sake lees.
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  • Etuko Maruyama, Kaorui Sakamoto, Kiyoka Okai
    1995 Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 224-230
    Published: November 20, 1995
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    By examining Japonica rice and Indica rice, we obtained the following results:
    (1) General evaluation in the sensory test showed that Akitakomachi was most favored. Indica rice was dull, hard and not very sticky. Its taste was not well liked. RINX-89 was sticky, soft and had a unique fragrance.
    (2) Iodine absorption of the solution extracted during cooking Indica rice was higher than that of Japonica rice. Indica rice contained much more protein than Japonica rice.
    (3) Amylogram characteristics had a significant correlation with viscosity. Indica rice had higher gelatinization temperature, while Japonica rice and RINX-89 had higher maximum viscosity, break-down and final viscosity.
    (4) The water in which cooked Japonica rice was rinsed contained higher total amounts of sugar and reducing sugar than Indica rice. This showed a correlation with taste evalution. Indica rice had a higher β-amylolysis limit. This was assumed to be caused by the difference between starch on the surface of cooked Jndica rice and that of cooked Japonica rice.
    (5) Sugar composition of the water in which cooked rice had been rinsed differed from rice to rice: Koshihikari and Akitakomachi contained more G1, G2, G3, while Hoshiyutaka and A 1-333 had less G1, G2, G3.
    (6) The sensory test of rice cooked by different methods showed that Indica rice was more suitable for being cooked as butter-rice than by ordinary rice-cooker method.
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  • Keiko Hatae, Sonoko Ayabe, Yasuko Kainuma, Atsuko Shimada
    1995 Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 231-236
    Published: November 20, 1995
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Thai rice was cooked with 1.6-and 1.9-fold amounts of water and the resultant cooked rice samples (A1 and A 2) were used as controls to be compared with test samples. To prepare test samples, we added each of the following ingredients to the two different amounts of water at the specified amount: salad oil,3% (samples B 1 and B2); mirin,2.5% (samples C1 and C2); salad oil and mirin,3%and 2.5%, respectively (samples D1 and D2); rice vinegar,5% (samples E1 and E2); the same vinegar,6%, which was used only for soaking for 30 min then drained (samples F1 and F2); sake,5% (samples G1 and G2); agar,1% (samples H1 and H2); and gelatin,1% (samples I1 and I2). For these 18 samples, appearances and textural properties were determined by texturometry and sensory tests.
    Samples B1, C1, D1 and F1 were less hard and sample H1 was much harder in texture than sample A1. All the sample series A2-I2 were softer and more sticky than all the other sample series A1-I1. Sensory tests showed that the appearance of sample B1 was better in glossiness and transparency than sample A1. Sample D1 appeared better than sample B1, though there is no significant textural difference between A1 and samples B1 and D1. Sample F1 was soft and sticky and its texture was preferred, although a vinegar-like odor remained. When the concentration of vinegar in sample F1 decreased to 3%, cooked rice was flat in odor but its texture was not improved. We thus failed to find out any particular sample which was improved in respect of all the items tested.
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  • Toshiko FUJII, Sumiko NAGAI, Chiharu KUSUNOSE, Hiroshi MATSUMOTO
    1995 Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 237-246
    Published: November 20, 1995
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study clarifies the role of starch in the process of forming the structure of sponge cake. Sponge cakes are usually made of wheat flour, egg, and sugar as main ingredients. However, the experimental system for cakes made with these ingredients becomes too complex to study the behavior of starch granules in cake batters due to the viscous nature of materials such as wheat flour proteins. For this reason, either wheat starch or potato starch was substituted for wheat flour so that sponge cakes could be prepared in the most simple system possible. The structure of gas cells was observed in sponge cakes made from either wheat or potato starch through a scanning electron microscope. Gas cells were spherical and continuous in the wheat starch sponge cake, whereas the gas cells were mostly nonspherical in the potato starch sponge cakes, the gas cells having been destroyed, forming discontinuous layers. The difference in the gas cell structure of these cakes is dependent partly on whether or not starch granules are nuiformly dispersed on the surface of air bubbles in cake batters. The wheat starch granules were distributed uniformly on the surface of air bubbles, but the potato starch granules were not. The difference in the gas cell structure may also be attributed to the fragility caused by the swelling and deformation of the potato starch granules, as observed by the Amyloviscograph.
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  • Fumiyo Sako, Etsuko Mori, Hiroyuki Watabe
    1995 Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 247-252
    Published: November 20, 1995
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    French dressings of both emulsion- and separation-types were prepared with pellila oil to which an antioxidant was added, and their oxidative stability, emulsifying stability and color tone were compared to dressings prepared with soy oil.
    The changes in carbonyl value, TBA value and fluorescence intensity were small during storage time. The storage temperature affected the oxidative stability of all dressings. No difference was found in any of the oil dressings at 5°C except at the 16th week for the emulsion-type(made with a hand mixer). However, POV increased at 25°C after 4 weeks for all dressings, and the increase in POV for emulsion(made with a shaker) and separation-type pellila oil dressing was significantly larger than that for the soy oil dressing. The changes in chroma and color difference for the pellila oil dressing (made with a shaker) were slightly smaller than those for the soy oil dressing. The emulsifying property of pellila oil was good when the mixing time was long, and no difference was found in the sensory test.
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  • Takeshi Sumino, Kuniko Aida, Kentaro Kaneko, Takashi Kaneda
    1995 Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 253-256
    Published: November 20, 1995
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study was carried out to clarify the microorganisum of Kimchi. The results were as follows;
    1. Anaerobic and aerobic bacteria Counts isolated from Kimuchi were 102-108/g and 103-108/g, respectively.
    2. The microflora (134 strains) isolated from Kimchi was classified into gram positive rods (106strains), gram positive coccus (19 strains) and gram negative rods (9 strains).
    3. The genus of Family Enterobacteriaceae (53 strains) isolated from Kimchi was consisted of Enterobacter (36 strains), Serratia (2 strains), Klebsiella (3 strains), Hafnia (1 strain) and others.
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  • Hiroko Hashiba
    1995 Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 257-264
    Published: November 20, 1995
    Released: April 26, 2013
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  • Keiko Nagao
    1995 Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 265-273
    Published: November 20, 1995
    Released: April 26, 2013
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  • [in Japanese]
    1995 Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 274-282
    Published: November 20, 1995
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1995 Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 283-289
    Published: November 20, 1995
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1995 Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 290-296
    Published: November 20, 1995
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1995 Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 297-302
    Published: November 20, 1995
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1995 Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 303-306
    Published: November 20, 1995
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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