The Journal of Education and Health Science
Online ISSN : 2434-9127
Print ISSN : 0285-0990
Volume 63 , Issue 2
Showing 1-6 articles out of 6 articles from the selected issue
  • Keiko ABE, Tatsuya MIMURA, Hiroshi AKITAKE, Kan-ichi MIMURA
    2018 Volume 63 Issue 2 Pages 167-174
    Published: 2018
    Released: October 01, 2021
    JOURNAL RESTRICTED ACCESS
    The purposes of this study were to determine the development of plantar arch in children aged from 0 to 12, and also to determine the relationship between plantar arch and motor ability in different groups, namely boys and girls at preschool and school age, respectively. The plantar arches of 6802 subjects were scanned by Pedoscope, and the subjects were engaged in 3 field-based physical fitness tests: sprint (25m sprint in infants and 50m sprint in elementary school children), broad jump, and ball throw (tennis ball throw in infants and softball throw in elementary school children). The results showed that to age 6 or 7, about 70 % of children have the formation of longitudinal arch (normal-arch feet). Boys with flat feet exhibited lower motor ability than their counterparts with normal-arch feet. Although no definite correlations between flat feet and throwing ability have been identified from our data in girls, the sprint and jump abilities of girls with normal-arch feet were significantly greater than girls with flat feet.
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  • Katsunori SUMI
    2018 Volume 63 Issue 2 Pages 175-185
    Published: 2018
    Released: October 01, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    Based on the self-determination theory, which is a framework for understanding motivation and adjustment, high self-determined motivation facilitates subsequent learning-related adjustment, which low self-determined motivation negatively affects learning-related adjustment. However, few studies have examined such effects of academic motivation in Japanese college students. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects by using longitudinal data.  In total 206 college students (90 women and 116 men) took part in two questionnaire sessions (Time 1 and Time 2) separated by four weeks. They completed the academic motivation scale at Time 1 and the learning-related adjustment measures at Time 1 and 2, which comprised the learning satisfaction, learning efforts, learning self-efficacy, learning self-actualization, and learning anxiety scales, and the Japanese version of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. All the measures were anonymously administered by a teacher after classes. The data were analyzed using a hierarchical multiple regression analysis.  The results showed that academic motivation had an effect on subsequent learning-related adjustment at Time 2, even after controlling for previous learning-related adjustment at Time 1. The effect seemed to be small on self-esteem as compared to that on other aspects of learning-related adjustment. There were negative and positive effects of amotivation and intrinsic motivation, respectively, on subsequent learning-related adjustment. Although extrinsic motivation exerted a significant effect on learning-related adjustment, of the regulation styles that constituted extrinsic motivation, external and introjected regulations had a negative effect, while identified regulation had a positive effect. Therefore, in most cases, controlled motivation and autonomous motivation had negative and positive effect on subsequent learning-related adjustment, respectively. The findings of this study supported the validity of the self-determination theory on its relationship to learning-related adjustment, and revealed that the dichotomy of controlled and autonomous motivation was more advantageous than that of extrinsic and intrinsic motivation.
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  • Ayane SATO, Keisuke FUJII, Taishi TSUJI, Takashi JINDO, Naruki KITANO, ...
    2018 Volume 63 Issue 2 Pages 186-194
    Published: 2018
    Released: October 01, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    Introduction: In some regions, experts train community-dwelling older people so that they can manage voluntary group exercise activities and provide technical advice to participants in their programs. Such group exercise activities led by older volunteers are increasing. However, the effect of volunteers' exercise support has not yet been sufficiently examined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of group exercise activities led by older volunteers, which mainly entailed the Square-Stepping Exercise (SSE), on the lower-extremity physical function of community-dwelling older women. Methods: Subjects were 60 community-dwelling older women in Kasama City, Ibaraki. Thirty women participated in a group exercise activity managed by older volunteers (SSE group activity) for approximately 1 year, while the remaining 30 subjects did not (control group). The SSE group activity consisted of an SSE for improving lower extremity physical function, and warm-up and cool-down exercises. The lower extremity physical function of all 60 subjects was assessed using 5 physical performance tests: one-leg balance with eyes open, 5-repetition sit-to-stand, timed up and go, 5 m habitual walk, and 4-way choice reaction time; tests were performed before and after the 1-year of the activity period. Results: Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant interaction in the performance on the timed up and go (P = 0.006). The performance of subjects who had participated in the SSE group activity remained the same in the pre and post tests (P = 0.211). On the other hand, subjects who did not take part in the SSE group activity exhibited a significant decline in their performance on the timed up and go (P = 0.007). No significant difference was found in the other 4 physical performance tests for either group. Conclusion: Participation in an SSE group activity managed by older volunteers can maintain the mobility skills of community-dwelling older women.
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  • Akemi OGATA, Kanako OGISO, Nobuko AIDA
    2018 Volume 63 Issue 2 Pages 195-203
    Published: 2018
    Released: October 01, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    The purpose of this study was to clarify the organizational management for employee retention and human support for employees being promoted by managers of facilities covered by public aid providing long-term care to the elderly or intensive care homes for the elderly. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with five facility managers who consented to participate in the study and managed facilities with a low turnover rate that actively carried out initiatives to promote employee retention. The data was subjected to qualitative inductive analysis and then coded and categorized. Two categories were derived for organizational management: work environment and competence development. One category was derived for human support: building smooth interpersonal relationships.  Appropriate organizational management may increase work satisfaction and a desire to continue a post in employees, which may in turn contribute to greater employee retention.
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  • Ryosuke SHIGEMATSU, Matsunosuke MORITA
    2018 Volume 63 Issue 2 Pages 204-211
    Published: 2018
    Released: October 01, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    Teaching to swim in a pool might be less effective compared with that on land because the water restricts learners’ hearing and breathing. However, a new teaching method could be effective in teaching to swim. Internet-based social networking services (SNS) can save large-size movie files, show learners’ performance, and facilitate communication with other learners, instructors, and parents. The movie files can be played anytime, anywhere, and with anybody. This study tested the effectiveness and usefulness of SNS as a new teaching method. Participants were eight children aged 12-16 years who attended eight sessions (two days per week for four weeks). They were assigned to either the SNS group or the control group. In each session, the SNS group was recorded when they swam from the pool wall with a gliding motion. Researchers guided them to improve their gliding motion in a swimming pool using the movie file. After each session, the researchers uploaded the files of four participants on Facebook and asked them to watch all the files repeatedly. The gliding motion of the control group was also recorded and they were provided guidance; however, the movie files were not uploaded on Facebook. During the eight sessions, the SNS group watched the movie files and left their comments on their motions. Results indicated that gliding motion scores and participants’ attitude improved, but not significantly. The number of subjective effects in the SNS group was significantly more than those in the control group. Thus, SNS could be a new teaching method to improve gliding motion in swimming.
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  • - From an Inquiry into the Actual Drinking Habits of Parents -
    Kazuko ETO, Naomi TANIGAWA, Satomi TOTSUKA
    2018 Volume 63 Issue 2 Pages 212-219
    Published: 2018
    Released: October 01, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    Parents who have one or more elementary school-aged children completed an alcohol-related questionnaire. Based on the results, almost twice as many fathers were classified under the categories of “caution needed with regards to alcoholism” or “suspicion of alcoholism” than mothers. Furthermore, these parents showed insufficient knowledge about the “harms from long-term and excessive alcohol drinking” in the alcohol-related knowledge questions. These results suggest that the parents’ drinking behavior influences their children’s drinking behavior, and also that these parents are influenced from their parents as well. Therefore, for alcohol prevention education for children to be effective, the enrollment of parents, particularly fathers, and an e-learning system that allows parents to participate in the home, is necessary. To this aim, further research into the development of attractive educational materials and the introduction of such materials into elementary schools is needed.
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