The Journal of Education and Health Science
Online ISSN : 2434-9127
Print ISSN : 0285-0990
Volume 64 , Issue 2
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from the selected issue
  • Comparison with Instruction of Fitness Experts
    Ayane SATO, Takashi JINDO, Keisuke FUJII, Naruki KITANO, Takumi ABE, S ...
    2019 Volume 64 Issue 2 Pages 134-143
    Published: 2019
    Released: October 01, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    Introduction: An exercise program managed by fitness experts was held as a service for preventative care for community-dwelling older adults. Older volunteers also held a group exercise activity as the same service in some regions. Although volunteers are not familiar with instructional exercise, it was necessary for them to produce similar results to those produced by the fitness experts. Square-Stepping Exercise (SSE) is a novel exercise that can be easily instructed without the aid of professional trainers, and could help maintain the lower extremity physical function of older adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the effect of SSE instructed by older volunteers is different from the effect produced by experts. Methods: Twenty participants took part in a group exercise activity facilitated by older volunteers. Another 20 participated in the exercise program supervised by fitness experts. The group exercise activity and exercise program, which primarily entailed the SSE, was held once a week for 11 weeks in Kasama City, Ibaraki. The lower extremity physical function was assessed using 4 physical performance tests: one-leg balance with eyes open, 5-repetition sit-to-stand, timed up-and-go, and 5m habitual walk. Results: Two-way ANOVA did not demonstrate a significant interaction or main effect in any physical performance test (P =0.071~0.758). Conclusion: There may not be any significant difference in effect of SSE instructed by older volunteers and fitness experts.
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  • Data and Time Series Data Analyses
    Hideki TOJI, Aya KAJIHARA, Yoshiaki EGUCHI
    2019 Volume 64 Issue 2 Pages 144-157
    Published: 2019
    Released: October 01, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
     This study aimed to examine the characteristics and sex differences in physique and physical fitness of middle-aged and the elderly (range, 60-83 years). The physique and physical fitness of middle-aged and the elderly were measured once a year for 13 years. In total, 48 males and 40 females, who completed continuous measurements over 3 years, were compared and examined using panel data and time series data analyses. In the panel data analysis, it was found that height, body weight, body fat percentage (% FAT) , lean body mass (LBM), grip strength, one leg stand with eyes open (OLEO), 10-m hurdle walk time (10mHW), and shuttle stamina walk test (SSTw) were significantly correlated with age in both sexes. In the body mass index (BMI) of females and the sit-up of males were significantly correlated with age. In the time series data analysis, LBM, grip strength, sit-up, OLEO, 10mHW, and SSTw were significantly correlated with age in both sexes. Further, the % FAT and osteo sono-assessment index (OSI) in males, and height, BMI, and sitting trunk flexion in females were significantly correlated with age. Significant differences were observed in the % FAT, sit-up, OLEO, 10mHW, and SSTw of males, in BMI and LBM of females in the slope of the regression line between panel data and time series data analyses. A significant difference was observed in the slope of the regression line only in the grip strength between males and females in the panel data analysis.  Based on the above results, the physique in both sexes is affected by various biases, also physical fitness in men is affected. Further, in panel data analysis, sex differences were found only in the grip strength.
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  • Sayuri TOIDA, Sonoko HIRASAWA, Masumi KUMADA
    2019 Volume 64 Issue 2 Pages 158-166
    Published: 2019
    Released: October 01, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    This study aimed to elucidate how students want to use knowledge acquired and photograph-based teaching materials in exercises performed for them to understand the historical background of the elderly and to communicate with the elderly in clinical practices. This study also investigated the effects of using photograph-based teaching materials by students in clinical practices. Consequently, the following four categories were extracted as the purposes students used photograph-based teaching materials: “I want to use photograph-based teaching materials as communication tools,” “I want to deeply understand users,” “I want to establish excellent relationships with users,” and “I want to get involved with users as an excellent stimulant by using reminiscence therapy.” The following three categories were extracted as the effects of using photograph-based teaching materials in clinical practices: “activation of communication between users and students,” “stimulation by drawing reminiscence and interest from users,” and “understanding of users, including their lives and historical backgrounds.” The first, second, and third category indicated the effects on both users and students, only users, and only students, respectively. Students found knowledge acquired and photograph-based teaching materials used in exercises to be important because they reduced the students’ anxiety about communication with the elderly and complemented their insufficient communication skills. The use of photograph-based teaching materials in gerontological nursing practices using reminiscence therapy was suggested to be effective for both students and users.
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  • Relations with Walking Ability
    Kashiko FUJII
    2019 Volume 64 Issue 2 Pages 167-180
    Published: 2019
    Released: October 01, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
     The purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence of foot conditions in older adults using home visiting nursing stations, and to identify how they feel about their feet and how the elderly care their own feet. Study samples comprised of 55 clients above 65 years old who use long-term insurance or medical insurance. Samples were divided into two groups, those who walk and those who do not walk. According to objective observation, the score of transformation of toes, skin weakness, sensitivity, coldness are significantly higher in those who do not walk than in those who walk. There were no significant differences on all items in subjective observation, and subjects on all items tended to respond "no concern". On the results of self -care, frequency of "no care at all" were high in those who walk. Foot problems are common in older adults using home visiting stations,according to the assessment. However, their problems are not perceived as concerns according to the clients. This may lead to delay of necessary treatments for foot conditions.
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  • Tetsuya YABE
    2019 Volume 64 Issue 2 Pages 181-190
    Published: 2019
    Released: October 01, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
     The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of physical fitness in alleviating anxiety and stress in high school students. One hundred seventeen high school students from O high school participated in this intervention study. Physical fitness test of all the participants was carried out 5 times in their physical education class. Anxiety and stress levels in the students before and after the interventions were recorded using The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children(STAIC)and Stress Response scale(SRS-18), respectively. The results based to the STAIC measurements revealed that anxiety improved significantly in high stressor group. The results of SRS-18 tests also showed improvements in high stressor group. Improvements in Lethargy among second grade students of high school was found to be better compared to the first grade students of high school in middle stressor group. The results suggest that perceived high stressor group was positively affected by physical fitness. The effects indicated differential change in grade among different stressor groups.
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