Nihon Naika Gakkai Zasshi
Online ISSN : 1883-2083
Print ISSN : 0021-5384
ISSN-L : 0021-5384
Volume 46 , Issue 7
Showing 1-7 articles out of 7 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese]
    1957 Volume 46 Issue 7 Pages 669-706
    Published: October 10, 1957
    Released: February 22, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Yasuo Tomari
    1957 Volume 46 Issue 7 Pages 707-720
    Published: October 10, 1957
    Released: February 22, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    1) Differences are observed between the species of animals on the biosynthesis of Co-C (cocarboxylase) in blood corpuscles. The ability was very strong in rats and dogs, moderate in rabbits and relatively weak in guinea pigs and human being.
    2) The author then attempted to estimate the ability of biosynthesis of Co-C in blood corpuscles in various diseases. The results can be summarized as follows:
    a) In beriberi the content of Co-C in blood naturally decreased, but the conversion of added thiamine to Co-C was vivid. Also in some cases of pulmonary tuberculosis and in diabetes mellitus Co-C was decreased, and the biosynthesis of Co-C in blood corpuscles well maintained.
    b) In Basedow's disease no decrease of Co-C was observed and the biosynthesis of Co-C in blood corpuscles took place as usual.
    c) In hepatic diseases the Co-C index in blood generally did not differ from that in healthy people, except in liver cirrhosis in which the content of Co-C distinctly diminished in blood. As for the biosynthseis of Co-C in blood corpuscles, however, the ability apparently decreased fast in all cases of hepatic diseases.
    d) In malignant tumors the circumstances were very complicated.
    In certain cases the content of Co-C in blood diminished (perhaps due to anemia), but in other cases much increased.
    The biosynthesis of Co-C in blood corpuscles also was disturbed in some cases.
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  • Tooru Horii
    1957 Volume 46 Issue 7 Pages 721-738
    Published: October 10, 1957
    Released: February 22, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    (1) The author observed the relationship between renal function (renal clearance) and the level of blood pressure of 20 cases of hypertensive diseases with or without renal damage (with or without reduction of RPF) during the prolonged oral administration of hypotensive drugs and also determined the adequate level of the blood pressure by these patients.
    (2) In the patients of whom RPF was decreased, it is found that the systolic or mean blood pressure should not permit to fall under the range 0 to 30% of the initial systolic or mean blood pressure. And the permittable fall degree of the blood pressure is settled by the grade of the general arterial sclerosis and not parallel to the reduction of RPF.
    (3) By the hypertensive patients with marked renal damage, the permittable fall degree of the blood pressure is almost 0% of the initial blood pressure.
    In the group with normal RPF, the permittable fall degree of blood pressure is 0 to 30% of the initial systolic or mean blood pressure. The permittable fall degree of the blood pressure is dependent on the level of the initial systolic blood pressure and the grade of the general arteriosclerosis. The permittable fall of the blood pressure in arteriosclerosis is slight against that of normotensive patients.
    (4) By the patients whose permittable fall degree of the blood pressure is 0%, the reduction of RPF is almost parallel to the fall of the systolic blood pressure and the fall of the blood pressure is accompanied by a marked decrease of RPF and GFR and a marked increases of RVR.
    (5) Of the patients whose blood pressure is permitted to fall, RPF, RVR and FF gradually return to the normal range accompanied with the fall of the blood pressure. But GFR changes not or increases slightly. If the blood pressure falls under the permittable fall degree, RPF decreases notably. These facts show us that the renal blood vessels of the hypertensive patients are still able to respond to the vasodilatatoric hemodynamic factors.
    (6) There is no significant correlation between the permittable fall degree of the blood pressure, RPF, the initial blood pressure and the eyeground findings (Keith-Wagener's classification).
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  • Satoshi Ota
    1957 Volume 46 Issue 7 Pages 739-751
    Published: October 10, 1957
    Released: February 22, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    PCG in mitral stenosis has been studied on the aspect for its quantitative diagnosis.
    As results
    1) The deláyed start of the first heart sound was observed in mitral stenosis (Q-1 interval, normal 0.047″, ms 0.075″, ); and this was assumed to be dependent upon the higher left atrial pressure in mitral stenosis.
    2) There was proportional correlation between Q-1 interval and PC in mitral stenosis (coefficient+0.65).
    3) Opening snap is pathognomonic in mitral stenosis, and 2-OS interval was assumed to be influenced both by the higher left atrial pressure and the rigidity of mitral valve in mitral stenosis.
    4) (Q-1)-(2-OS) interval showed good correlation with PA as well as PC (coefficient+0.76, +0.82); and this may be helpful in making quantitative diagnosis of mitral stenosis and in estimating the effect of its commisurotomy.
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  • Kanji Ono
    1957 Volume 46 Issue 7 Pages 752-758
    Published: October 10, 1957
    Released: February 22, 2011
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    1) The intrahepatic circulation of the blood in urethan-anaesthetized mice has been observed by means of the transillumination technique. The parathion poisoning in mice were experimentally caused by one or continuous injection every day.
    2) In the cases of one injection (after 15 min., injected subcutaneously) were observed many changes: the swelling of the Kupffer's cells, the dilation and engorgement of the sinusoids, the granular swelling of the liver cells and the appearance of a large number of leukocytes in sinusoid. According to these changes, in sinusoids occured remarkable disturbances of cirurlation simultaneously. After 1.30 to 2 hours, then, the degenerative changes in the central zone of the lobule were demonstrated.
    3) The anisocytosis of the liver cells was demonstrated in large extent, and the granular change and a few fatty degeneration were recognized in the cytoplasm.
    4) The small hemorrage was observed chiefly in the central zone within about 24 hours. However, hardly any above change was recognized thereafter.
    5) In the continuous injection groups, were observed the similar, but more severe features than the one injected group.
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  • Hiroshi Akama
    1957 Volume 46 Issue 7 Pages 759-763
    Published: October 10, 1957
    Released: February 22, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Observations were made with “transillumination technique” of the liver in situ in rats and mice in which both kidneys had been removed. The following are the conclusions:
    1) Shortly after bilateral nephrectomy, sinusoids are somewhat dilated, the velocity of blood stream slightly accelerated, but no demonstrable changes occur in the liver cells, biliary capillaries and Kupffer's cells. If a dye, azorbin S, was infused, appearance and disappearance of the dye granules were faster in nephrectomized animals than normals. The effects of the injection of hepatotonica (Ca-or Na paraoxybenzoate, Na hippurate, ACTH) or cholagoga (Na dehydrocholate) upon the blood stream, sinusoids and movement of dye were greater in such mice than normals.
    2) At 24 hours after bilateral nephrectomy, the blood vessels are considerably dilated, and both velocity of blood stream and blood volume increased. These changes are more marked than shortly after nephrectomy. The influence of hepatotonica upon such changes and the excretion of the dye into the bile are also greater at 24 hours.
    3) The observations made one week after unilateral nephrectomy were similar to those made immediately after bilateral nephrectomy.
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  • 1957 Volume 46 Issue 7 Pages 764-801
    Published: October 10, 1957
    Released: February 22, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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