Journal of Regional Fisheries
Online ISSN : 2435-712X
Print ISSN : 1342-7857
Volume 57 , Issue 2
Showing 1-6 articles out of 6 articles from the selected issue
Scholarly Papers
  • From the Perspective of Science Studies
    Hideo INOMATA
    2017 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages 1-25
    Published: February 01, 2017
    Released: June 26, 2020
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Since the 1990s, growing number of academic reports on fisheries management in Japan have called its unique features “Japanese-style”. They suggest that total allowable catch system can be implemented by fishermen’s self-management, not necessarily by individual quota scheme which was introduced in some western nations. The perceived distinction between Japan and western nations is not limited to the technical aspects of fisheries but is extended to the basic thoughts and concepts of socio-economy of each nation. While such recognition by scientific community concerning Japanese-style fisheries management seems to satisfy the criteria of “paradigm” of scientific discipline which Thomas Kuhn originally advocated, some reservations on this underlying assumption remain due to the limitation of the analytical framework of this article. Future research needs on this topic includes refined analytical methodology on paradigm as well as the exploration of the theoretical foundation of Japanese-style fisheries management.

    Download PDF (659K)
  • Yuki MORI, Naruhito TAKENOUCHI, Sachiko HARADA, Chiemi MIURA, Takeshi ...
    2017 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages 27-39
    Published: February 01, 2017
    Released: June 26, 2020
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    In recent years the salmon changes with a tendency to sideways movement exceptionally while a tendency to decrease has the consumption of marine products. The sea surface culture of salmon begins in each place in the country, and branding is planned as “a local salmon”. In Ainan-town, began the culture of SATSUKIMASU salmon in 2014. In this study, I carried out the sampling questionnaire of an SATSUKIMASU salmon cultivated in Ainan-town and considered a strength and a problem, directionality of the differentiation. A result, there were the most answers “to be slightly poor” about the smell A cultured SATSUKIMASU salmon thinks that construction of the business model that profit is continued securing for the future is important.

    Download PDF (893K)
  • An Aspect of Structural Change in Salmon Industry
    Masahiro YAMAO, Michiko AMANO
    2017 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages 41-58
    Published: February 01, 2017
    Released: June 26, 2020
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Salmon industry in Japan has developed along with the improvement of hatcheries and raising technologies. Hatcheries catch salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) that return to their own revers, and spawn, raise and release fingerings. Salmon hatcheries are a starting point of local salmon industry. In 2011, Great Disaster of East Japan seriously damaged a number of hatcheries in Iwate prefecture. With concessive support from governments, fisheries cooperatives reconstructed those hatcheries having been damaged. This paper purposed to survey the recovery process of hatcheries located in Iwate prefecture and identify their sustainability in maintaining salmon industries. Economic surroundings of hatcheries have been getting worse; therefore, how to operate them in sustainable way becomes a controversial issue even after the completion of the recovery programs.

    Download PDF (713K)
  • Kazumitsu MATSUGU, Masahiro YAMAO, Michiko AMANO, Kenji HOSONO
    2017 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages 59-76
    Published: February 01, 2017
    Released: June 26, 2020
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    How we build up a strategy of encouraging fish consumption is a key issue in the growth of fishing industry, along with ever-expanding of outsourcing of meals. This paper is to clarify conditions in order to increase fish consumption in specified food service facilities such as hospital, home for the aged, and the cafeteria of school, company and factory, etc.

    A survey was conducted with two specific objectives. The first was to reveal whether or not we would be able to encourage fish consumption in these specified food service facilities. The second was to offer a possible way to increase fish consumption. It may be possible to increase fish consumption at homes for the aged. There might be two right conditions. One is that there is a fish retail shop near the homes, and the other is that they have dealt with this fish retail shop well.

    Download PDF (760K)
  • Tatsuo KATO, Reiko HIGASHIMURA
    2017 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages 77-91
    Published: February 01, 2017
    Released: June 26, 2020
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    The economic development in East Asia is characterized by the extremely open development that we call ‘Asian global model’. In Asian countries, where they are not strong in the fundamental conditions of industrial development, which are resource, market, capital or technique, and infrastructure. The special economic zone for foreign firms, the market for export, political introduction of foreign capital, and construction of infrastructure with international help, allow their rapid development. Countries in different development stages co-exist in current East Asia. The behaviors of the global food companies are different depending on their stage of the development. In developing countries with more than 5,000 dollars of GDP/person, global food companies increased production for domestic markets of urban area, with capital-intensive techniques.

    Download PDF (725K)
  • Investigation of Reasons and Livelihoods through Interviews
    Haruko YAMASHITA
    2017 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages 93-105
    Published: February 01, 2017
    Released: June 26, 2020
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    This paper illustrates the reasons why fishers over 65 years old, that make up 36% of fishers, continue fishery while some fishers retire at this point. After interviews with 9 retirees and 19 active fishers, both groups aged around eighty, we concluded as follows. Many unintentionally retired fishers wanted to continue fishery. Active fishers who operated fishery as a family businesses were either willing to fish or wishing to retire if their replacements were available. While per-year days at sea of self-employed fishers vary, they equally expressed hardship: their fishery income was not enough to cover living expenses, so they had to spend pension revenue. A sort of fisher and fishing gear-matching system will help realizing their desires.

    Download PDF (492K)
feedback
Top