The Japanese Journal of Pharmacology
Online ISSN : 1347-3506
Print ISSN : 0021-5198
ISSN-L : 0021-5198
Volume 23 , Issue 6
Showing 1-26 articles out of 26 articles from the selected issue
  • 6TH REPORT: INFLUENCE OF SEX HORMONES ON THE ELEVATION OF NADH-CYTOCHROME c REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN LIVER PLASMA MEMBRANE OF CCl4-ADMINISTERED RATS
    Yasusuke MASUDA, Masato KUCHII, Hiroyuki YAMAMOTO, Tadashi MURANO
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 753-756
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    NADH-cytochrome c reductase and NADH dehydrogenase activities in liver cell membranes were not effected by orchiectomy and ovariectory. Time required for the elevation of these enzyme activities following CCl4 administration in orchiectomized rats was, however, apparently shortened and comparable with that in the non-treated females. Administration of 17-α-methyltestosterone recovered completely the response to CCl4 as was seen in the male controls. In female rats, ovariectomy or administration of diethylstilbestrol produced no effects on the CCl4induced changes of membrane enzyme activities. Membrane ATPase activity decreased following CCl4 administration in such hormonal states of rats that the reductase and the dehydrogenase activities were increased. Male sex hormone appears to suppress changes of these enzyme activities in the membranes following CCl4 administration.
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  • 7TH REPORT: INFLUENCE OF CCl4 ADMINISTRATION ON SOLUBILIZATION OF THE ENZYMES IN ELECTRON TRANSPORT SYSTEM IN RAT LIVER PLASMA MEMBRANE AND MICROSOME
    Yasusuke MASUDA, Masato KUCHII, Hiroyuki YAMAMOTO, Tadashi MURANO
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 757-765
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In liver microsomes of normal rats, both NADH-ferricyanide dehydrogenase and NADH-cytochrome c reductase were almost completely solubilized by addition of 0.5% DOC. Solubilization patterns were little affected by CCl4 injection. In membranes, solubilization of dehydrogenase and reductase was less than that in microsomes. CCl4 administration lowered the solubility of the dehydrogenase in membranes and increased three-fold the ratio of the reductase to the dehydrogenase remaining in the non-solubilized fraction. The reductase in membranes from CCl4 treated rat liver was found to be more resistant to solubilization by DOC. The possibility of accumulation of NADH-cytochrome c reductase in plasma membranes after CCl4 administration was discussed.
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  • 8TH REPORT: BINDING OF CYTOCHROME c TO LIVER PLASMA MEMBRANE AND MICROSOME IN CCl4-POISONED RATS
    Yasusuke MASUDA, Masato KUCHII, Nobuyuki OKADA, Hiroyuki YAMAMOTO, Tad ...
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 767-771
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Binding ability of liver plasma membranes of normal rats to oxidized form of cytochrome c was more potent than that of microsomes, although this binding was dependent on the buffer concentration of the suspending solution; namely, the higher the concentration of the buffer, the less was the binding of cytochrome c to both fractions. Conversely, the bound cytochrome c was eluted more easily from microsomes than from membranes, the elution pattern also being dependent on the buffer concentration. In the liver of CCl4-administered rats, the plasma membrane binds the hemoprotein more firmly and releases it less easily than in that of normal ones. Possibility of the elevation of NADH-cytochrome c reductase activity in liver cell membranes after CCl4 administration is discussed.
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  • 9TH REPORT: PROTECTIVE ACTION OF SODIUM TAURINE N-CARBO-DITHIOATE (TDT) AGAINST CCl4-INDUCED BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN LIVER CELL MEMBRANE OF RATS
    Yasusuke MASUDA, Masato KUCHII, Nobuyuki OKADA, Tadashi MURANO
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 773-779
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    TDT alone showed no significant effect on NADH-cytochrome c reductase or ATPase activity in liver cell membrane or microsomes. TDT completely repressed alteration of these enzyme activities in the membrane as well as leakage of the reductase into plasma resulting from CCl4 administration. TDT did not vary either the normal or the lowered body temp. resulting from an injection of CCl4. Mechanism of action of TDT was discussed.
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  • Toshiie SAKATA, Hideaki FUCHIMOTO
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 781-785
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Repeated administrations of high doses of theophylline to rats resulted in a series of stages which progressed as treatments were continued, i.e. hypoactivity, stereotypy, killing attack and automutilation, etc. Stereotyped behavior was continuous sniffing with backward locomotion, biting of the cage floor. standing on hind legs with forelimbs-flapping and turning somersaults in the cage. The aggressive behavior associated with theophylline treatment was that seen in affective aggression. The theophyllinized killers vigorously attacked animate as well as inanimate objects including rat-pups but never consumed their prey. Possible mechanisms of the effect of theophylline on aggressive behavior are discussed.
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  • Toshiie SAKATA, Hideaki FUCHIMOTO
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 787-792
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Sustained injection with a high dose of theophylline increased aggressiveness in rats in both behavioral ratings and paired fighting. In the latter test, 50% of theophyllinized pairs took the fighting position following a hand-clap and the 75% of treated rats were dominant over control partners. In the open field test, the theophyllinized rat discharged fewer boluses, but there was no change in ambulatory activity. The present results support the finding in our previous study that demonstrated the production of affective aggression with the chronic treatment of theophylline.
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  • K.C. SINGHAL, P.N. SAXENA, M.B.L. JOHRI
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 793-797
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The present study demonstrates the optimum conditions required for survival of the adult Setaria cervi in-vitro and the effect of some drugs on these worms. Continuous replacement of the perfusion fluid favoured survival of the worms. Aeration or oxygenation of the fluid had no effect. The optimum concentration of the glucose in Ringer's solution ensuring longest survival period was found to be 0.25 g/l. In such a modified Ringer's solution all the worms were living at the end of 72 hr. Addition of MgCl2 and NaH2PO4 into the fluid adversely affected the worms. Coal tar dyes, methyl violet, gentian violet and mercurochrome were found to be lethal to the adult worm in very low concentrations. Thiabendazole, diethylcarbamazine and acetylarsan were next in the descending order of potency. Piperazine hexahydrate, chlorpromazine and promethazine produced paralysis of the worms which regained normal motility after transference to the fresh solution. Sulphathiazole, streptomycin, penicillin and metronidazole had no effect.
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  • S. SHARAN, K.N. GARG
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 799-803
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The effect of ethyl alcohol on the blood glucose level was observed on normal as well as fasting rabbits. Although normal animals did not exhibit a significant hypoglycemic response, severe hypoglycemia followed ethanol administration in fasting rabbits. Estimation of liver glycogen content revealed that the animals developing hypoglycemia also had a diminished liver glycogen, whereas a hypoglycemic response was absent in those animals where the liver glycogen was within normal limits.
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  • C.M. PRASAD, D.S. SHAH, O.D. GULATI
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 805-811
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The uptake of guanethidine (3.3×10-5 M), debrisoquin (8.4×10-4 M), bretyliun (5.0×10-4 M) and xylocholine (1.0×10-3 M) by adrenergic neuron was studied indirectly by testing the ability of noradrenaline (NA) regarding low temp. or sodium-deprivation to prevent or reverse adrenergic neuron blocking action in the indirectly stimulated guinea-pig hypogastric nerve vas deferens preparations. NA (3.0×10-3 M) completely prevented the neuron blocking action of all the four blockers but reversed only that of bretylium. Exposure of preparations to a low temp. (0°C) prevented the neuron blocking action of all the four blockers but did not reverse that of anv one blocker. The adrenergic neuron blocking action of guanethidine was partially prevented but was not reversed by sodium-deprivation. Sodium-deprivation neither prevented nor reversed the neuron blocking action of the other three blockers. It is concluded that guanethidine shares the uptake mechanism of NA for transport across the neuron while debrisoquin, bretylium and xylocholine appear to be transported differently.
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  • Toshio YOSHIZAKI
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 813-816
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Studies were performed on the nature of splanchnic-adrenal transmission in the rat. Marked adrenaline secretion was observed after electrical stimulation of the greater splanchnic nerve, and optimum voltage and frequency in a train of tetanus of 1 mscc square for 10 sec at 10 sec intervals were 5 V and 20 c/sec respectively. Hexamethonium bromide caused marked inhibition of the response to the nerve stimulation and at a dose of 1 mg/kg, the inhibition rate was about 75%. Atropine also prevented adrenaline secretion in response to the tetanus, but the inhibitory action of 5 mg/kg of atropine sulfate was equipment to that of only 0.2 mg/kg of hexametlion ium bromide. Five mg/kg of atropine sulfate after i.v. Injection of 1 mg/kg of hexamethonium bromide caused appreciable inhibition of the residual adrenaline release by the stimulation of splanchnic nerve. It is concluded that transmission of impulses through muscarinic receptors may occur in the adrenal medulla of the rat, though this type of transmission is less prominent than that through nicotinic receptors.
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  • C.L. PATHAK
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 817-825
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Investigations on the action of three glucocorticoids (cortisone, hydrocortisone and prednisolone) in isolated frog and rabbit hearts indicate that the glucocorticoids exert a biphasic action. The biphasic action was observed in the form of stimulation at low concentrations (10-8 to 10-5 g/ml) and inhibitory action at higher concentrations (10-5 to 10-3 g/ml) with considerable overlap in the stimulating and inhibiting concentration ranges. Biphasic action was also observed at the same acting concentration in some hearts. Moderately inhibitory doses frequently produced stimulation during recovery. The action of corticoids was more marked on isotropic response than on chronotropic. Stimulation of inotropic response caused up to 22% increase in ventricular contraction, while inhibition of inotropic response was 100% (cardiac asystole) at high concentrations. Electrocardiographic record showed conduction block and myocardial depression at inhibitory concentrations. The rabbit hearts were more sensitive to glucocorticoids than were the frog hearts. On the basis of cardiac effect, the three corticoids were in the ascending order of potency: hydrocortisone, cortisone and prednisolone.
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  • N. CHAND, M.L. GUPTA, T.K. GUPTA, K.P. BHARGAVA
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 827-829
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The effect of haloperidol (2.5 mg/kg i.v.) was studied on the ovulation induced by progesterone (1 mg/kg s.c.); copper acetate (5 mg/kg i.v.) and coitus in adult female rabbits. Progesterone induced ovulation was blocked by prior treatment with haloperidol. On the other hand, it was found to have no effect on copper acetate induced ovulation. Treatment of rabbits with haloperidol before coitus resulted in loss of receptivity in all the rabbits tested. The results of this study indicate that central adrenergic or dopaminergic mechanisms are involved in progesterone induced ovulation and copper acetate may be acting directly at median eminence to bring about the release of LHRF. The precoital administration of haloperidol in female rabbits resulted in loss of receptivity.
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  • REPORT 22: EFFECTS OF NaNO2 AND NH2OH ON MITOCHONDRIAL MAO IN RAT BRAIN
    Kazunori SHIMIZU
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 831-838
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The effects of NaNO2 and NH2OH on mitochondrial MAO from rat brain were studied with the following results: NaNO2 and NH2OH activated the enzyme. The effects of NaNO2 and NH2OH on enzyme activity differed with different substrates. The activating effects of NaNO2 and NH2OH on MAO activity were reversible. NaNO2 did not cause activation at any concentration of pheniprazine and pargyline tested. However, 1×10-2M NH2OH decreased the inhibitions by pheniprazine and pargyline at all concentrations of the inhibitors tested. Addition of 1×10-2M NH2OH changed the Km value of MAO for tyramine from 1.25×10-2M to 6.2×10-3M.
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  • Chiseko NODA, Yasumi YUGARI
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 839-846
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The effects of catecholamines on the beating of rat heart cells in monolayer culture were examined. On adding 2×10-5M reserpine to the culture medium, the beating of heart cells stopped and as long as the cells were cultured in medium containing reserpine, beating did not resume to that observed before treatment with reserpine. When placed in a fresh medium without reserpine, some cells resumed beating after a lag period of 1 to 2 hr. Addition of 10-5M epinephrine or dopamine to the fresh medium reduced the lag period and the beating started within 5 to 20 min. Dopa had no effect on the beating. Propranolol, a β-adrenergic blocking agent, delayed the effect of norepinephrine. Acetylcholine (10-7-10-5M) or carbacol (10-5M) had no effect. From these results, it is suggested that catecholamines evoke the contraction of cultured heart cells, and that the rhythmical beat may be due to repeated cycles of depletion and replenishment of catecholamines.
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  • Jiro SUGIMOTO, Mitsuhiro NAGATA
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 847-851
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The role of potassium ions in the contraction of the vas deferens isolated from guinea-pig has been investigated herein. The preparation kept in an isotonic sucrose medium comprised of 0.07% sodium bicarbonate and 0.1% glucose was contracted by the addition of potassium ions at 5.6 mM, the concentration of which was the same as that in Locke's solution. When calcium ions, at any concentration, were used in place of potassium ions, the contraction was undiscernable, and when the calcium ion concentration exceeded 1.7 mM in the medium, the potassium induced contraction was depressed. This potassium induced contraction was not observable when the preparation had been pretreated by calcium-free Locke's solution, potassium-free Locke's solution, or strophanthin-G in large amounts. This contraction was seen even in the preparation, which had hardly responded to nicotine applied repeatedly. From these results, it is presumed that: potassium ions are essential for the initiation of smooth muscle contraction in the vas deferens, calcium ions present in the medium inhibit this potassium action, and smooth muscle contraction of vas deferens requires at least the presences of calcium ions, potassium ions, and ATP-ase activity in the tissue.
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  • Norio KURIHARA, Katsuhiro SHIBATA
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 853-858
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Histamine and 5-HT releases in in vitro anaphylaxis were measured spectrophotofluorometrically by immersing passively and actively sensitized guinea-pig small intestine, lung and aorta in Tyrode solution containing antigen. Histamine was released from sensitized tissues by an antigen. Values from three tissues were almost the same in both passive and active sensitizations. In passive sensitization, histamine and 5-HT were released spontaneously from tissues during and after sensitization. In active sensitization, histamine release from tissues increased along with an increase in concentration of antigen, while no increase was seen with 5-HT. 5HT was released only spontaneously from both passively and actively sensitized tissues.
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  • Seiichiro YOSHIDA, Takeshi SAKAI
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 859-869
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Bufosteroids, bufalin (4-5×10-5 g/ml), cinobufagin (7×10-5) and resibufogenin (1×10-4) showed a neuromuscular block in rat isolated diaphragm preparations, while digitoxigenin and ouabain showed no such block. A block of the twitch induced by direct stimulation was observed in the denervated preparations only. Presumably, bufalin can be classified as a depolarizing blocking agent such as succinylcholine, however, differed in the following: blocking effect was potentiated in a bath deficient in sodium ions; it was sensitive to stimulus frequency change; lower doses of bufalin increased the post-tetanic potentiation and antagonized the blocking effect induced by magnesium. These findings suggest that bufalin has a pre-synaptic effect presumably concerned with the bufalin-induced block.
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  • Noboru TODA
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 871-879
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Electrical transmural stimulation (0.3 msec duration at frequencies of 5, 20 and 100/sec) was given to spirally-cut strips of the ascending aorta from rabbits. Angiotensin (5×10-11 to 10-9 M) significantly potentiated the contractile response to transmural stimulation but did not influence the response to exogenously-applied noradrenaline. In response to angiotensin, percent increase in the duration of contraction induced by transmural stimulation was approx. proportional to that in the developed tension, whereas a prolongation of the duration by cocaine greatly exceeded the increase in the tension. The contractile response to transmural stimulation was suppressed by 5×10-6 M bretylium. The inhibitory effect of bretylium was not antagonized by angiotensin when administered prior to bretylium and after the bretylium-induced inhibition had been established. Cocaine reversed the inhibition by bretylium to a potentiation. The Mg++-induced inhibition of the response to transmural stimulation was not reversed by angiotensin but by excess Ca++. It appears that the angiotensin-induced potentiation of the contractile response to transmural neural stimulation is due mainly to a facilitation of the release of noradrenaline and that angiotensin does not participate in Ca++-Mg++ interactions relating to the release of sympathetic transmitters.
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  • Haruo OHNISHI, Shigeru TSUKUDA, Nobuhisa OGAWA
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 881-888
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Intramuscular or oral administration of cytochrome c provided a defense against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic impairment characterized by accumulation of triglycerides in the liver and damaged mitochondria. The mechanism may involve activation of the mitochondrial function by cytochrome c with the result that ATP production is increased, hence a normal metabolism is regained.
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  • Akira TOMIYAMA, Issei TAKAYANAGI, Masaki SAEKI, Keijiro TAKAGI
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 889-891
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Yoshimi MISU, Yasushi KURAISHI, Hiroshi TAKAGI
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 891-894
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Takaaki FUJII, Hideo NISHIMURA
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 894-896
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Tsutomu URUNO, Issei TAKAYANAGI, Nobuhiro INATOMI, Keijiro TAKAGI
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 897-898
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Tadashi FUJITA, Masahide YASUDA
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 899-901
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Kenji OHMORI, Tetsuo KOJIMA
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 901-903
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Yoshitsugu OSUMI, Shuji TAKAORI, Motohatsu FUJIWARA
    1973 Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 904-906
    Published: 1973
    Released: December 19, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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