Papers in Meteorology and Geophysics
Online ISSN : 1880-6643
Print ISSN : 0031-126X
ISSN-L : 0031-126X
Volume 12 , Issue 2
Showing 1-8 articles out of 8 articles from the selected issue
  • M. Aihara
    1961 Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 89-116
    Published: November 25, 1961
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Equations of motion, in a primitive form, of adiabatic change and continuity relation are used to examine the stability properties of the large-scale baroclinic disturbance including the non-geostrophic effect.
    Especially, in the longer and shorter wavelengths, there seem s to be no appreciable change in the stability criterion obtained so far.
    The fundamental equations involve three kinds of propaga t i ng waves. Two of them are expressed by combination of the Rossby wave and the inertial internal gravity wave, and the other is the socalled meteorologically significant wave, which propagates westward with a very small velocity.
    By using data carefully analysed, the following quantity is estimated; R=Kxt/ Kφt,
    in order to know the ratio of time rates of the kinetic energy of the divergent and rotational component of the wind.
    Simultaneously, G-number is estimated for 300,500 and 700mb levels of the atmosphere.
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  • E. Suzuki
    1961 Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 106-116
    Published: November 25, 1961
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The various simplified estimation procedures of normal correlation coefficient have already been given, but one comparatively accurate and simple method was recently introduced as a by-product of computing entropy in information theory for weather forecast by the author. However, the statistical error accompanying this estimation was not yet clarified in the previous paper.
    In this report, a certain approximate formula concerning such standard error is formerly shown, and moreover the several normalized transformation results of non-normal correlation coefficient are given in connection with the actual normalization procedures of the shortrange rainfall data of the Kanto district, Japan.
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  • Modeling Criteria for a Local Wind
    S. Nemoto
    1961 Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 117-128
    Published: November 25, 1961
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The similarity between the wind profile near the ground (for example, in the present work the wind profile above the urban district in a typhoon) and that above the rough surface set in a wind tunnel under the neutral state is described from another point of view using the same data previously obtained by Y. TAKAHASHI, K. SOMA and S. NEMOTO (1951), and then the similarity condition of the wind profile near the ground in the case where the effect of thermal stratification has been taken into account is discussed from another point of view.
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  • Modeling Criteria for a Local Wind
    S. Nemoto
    1961 Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 129-153
    Published: November 25, 1961
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Applying the relation obtained in the similarity theory of turbulence, it has been already theoretically obtained in Part I that the relation _??_would be approximately satisfied between the reduced scale of the wind velocity and that of the model as a condition of similarity, that is, practical and approximate modeling criterion for a local wind under the limited conditions. In the present paper, some experiments to which the above relation has been applied are described.
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  • 1961 Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 154-
    Published: 1961
    Released: December 14, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
  • M. Tamura, N. Tsuda
    1961 Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 155-162
    Published: November 25, 1961
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A new recording snow-gage, buried type, was reported partly on the 1958 year issue of this magazine (Vol.9 No.2). After that two sets of this snow-gage were built with some improvements made on its mechanism and installed at Kamikochi, Nagano Prefecture and at Takada Weather Station, Niigata Prefecture, respectively, for the practical test, which was successful.
    This paper reports the snow-gage and the results of the test, and describes, in addition, a new recording rain-and snow-gage, buried type.
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  • M. Momiyama(Sakamoto)
    1961 Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 163-179
    Published: November 25, 1961
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Based upon the calendars of seasonal diseases in Japan and some other countries outlined in the preceding papers, efforts are concentrated in this paper upon the historical survey of seasonal disease calendars in Japan, especially in its capital, and an extensive analysis of some selected diseases, particularly on their high mortality in the cold months. (1) A comparison of the 1912-16,1930-34 and 1952-56calendars reveals that more seasonal diseases raged in summer in 1910's and their death rates were much higher than in 1930's, and that senile maladies (heart disease, apoplexy and senility) registered summer mortality peaks, though smaller than the winter ones, in 1910's. (2) As for avitaminosis, tuberculosis and gastritis enteritis groups, the winter and summer mortality graphs clearly indicate that the gap between the summer and winter mortality indices got smaller year by year, until they crossed each other from 1938 through 1954, and then their relations definitely reversed themselves with the winter index exceeding the summer one. In the case of cancer, mortality was highest in autumn, while on the other hand the gap between the summer and winter indices gradually got narrower. As for senile diseases, the winter index has always been bigger than the summer one, and the spread between them has been getting wider since the end of the Second World War. (3) The overall mortality curve shows an interesting variation from 1910's through 1950's. There had been two peaks, a big one in summer and a small one in winter, but the former peak completely disappeared in 1955, whereas the winter peak has since made itself more and more remarkable, indicating the concentration of deaths in the cold season.
    Responsible for such high mo r tality in winter the following facts are to be noted:
    1) senile dise a ses (which have been winter illnesses) account for an increasing share of overall mortality,
    2) some diseases (which form erly prevailed in the hot months have come to rage in the cold season, and 3) the old age group has been markedly increasing in the age structure of the Japanese population since the war's termination (their mortality usually curves up steeply in winter).
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  • Y. Miyake, K. Saruhashi, Y. Katsuragi, T. Kanazawa
    1961 Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 180-181
    Published: November 25, 1961
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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