Papers in Meteorology and Geophysics
Online ISSN : 1880-6643
Print ISSN : 0031-126X
ISSN-L : 0031-126X
Volume 7 , Issue 2
Showing 1-11 articles out of 11 articles from the selected issue
  • T. Murakami
    1956 Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 69-89
    Published: October 15, 1956
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    During winter, there are three marked maxima of wind speed centered at (150°E,30°N), (70°W,40°N), and (40°E,25°N) respectively. The present numerical analysis suggests that these wind maxima have some dynamical relation with the mountains, such as the Himalayas and the Rocky Mountains.
    In June, upper westerlies generally split into two branches over the western part of the Pacific. By an inspection of the computed flow patterns for June, we have an impression that the splitting of the jet streams over the Far East is mainly caused by the effect of the Himalayas.
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  • T. Ozawa, K. Tomatsu
    1956 Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 90-98
    Published: October 15, 1956
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The statistical method for extended forecast is considered to have the two aspects of the climatological, statistical study and the verification of the various theories for the general circulation. In the following the relationship between the accumulation of angular momentum and the tendency of the zonal wind change for 5-day mean chart is statistically verified. Its relationship is statistically significant in high and middle latitudes. The study suggests that the momentum flow may be a useful quantity for forecasting the zonal wind-speed for the 5-day mean chart. As a preliminary report on the climatological, statistical study for the general circulation, the spectral distributions of the wave number of the height along the latitudes are discussed.
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  • K. Hama, K. Itoo
    1956 Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 99-106
    Published: October 15, 1956
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Many supercooled water-droplets were frozen on a cooling brass plate to find the effects of artificial rainmaking. The water-droplets were contaminated with silver iodide smoke and some soil and mineral powder. As shown in Tables 1 and 2 the freezing temperature was found for each contaminated substance. Freezing temperature of melted snow crystals was observed.
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  • I. Imai
    1956 Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 107-123
    Published: October 15, 1956
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    An analysis is made of a continuous record of raindrop sizedistributions, obtained at the ground, and an explanation is given in terms of the theory of precipitation streak. The maxima and the minima of the space concentrations for large drops preceded those for smaller drops. The observed time-lags agree well with those computed from upper-wind data, except for very small drops. From the observed surface distributions, an attempt is made to deduce probable size-distributions in the generating cell. Considering the effects of evaporation and collision during fall, and also an effect resulting from the drop-counting technique, in which drops are classified by size, the size distributions of raindrops in the generating cell are presumed to be very narrow, with many small drops and few large drops, compared with those usually observed at ground level in a continuous rain. They are very similar to those obtained by BLANCHARD (1953) in Hawaiian orographic rain-clouds.
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  • M. Sanuki, S. Kimura, N. Tsuda, S. Toyama
    1956 Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 124-127
    Published: October 15, 1956
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Biplane wind vanes with four interplane angles and a box wind. vane of the German Fuess type are tested in the wind tunnel concerning the time constant of their damped oscillation in the tunnel current. The observation is carried out in four steps of wind speed up to 20 m/s. The time constants are investigated with respect to the interplane angle and compared with that of the Fuess type which is rather inferior to the biplane type, contrary to the declaration given by the manufacturer.
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  • Y. Sugiura, T. Kanazawa
    1956 Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 128-135
    Published: October 15, 1956
    Released: December 11, 2012
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    Artificial radioactivity of rain water and fallout collected in Tokyo around 26th November are described. Next, concerning the radioactive dust fallen on 26th, the results of radiochemical analysis are presented.
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  • A Tentative Analysis of Wind Wave Data in View of the Foaming of Sea Water (II)
    T. Abe
    1956 Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 136-143
    Published: October 15, 1956
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The present author treated tentatively the relation between the wind speeds in the wind wave scale 3 and the surface water temperatures in an open sea using the data of oceanographical observations taken at the Ocean Weather Station “ X ” (39°N,153°E) in the North Pacific Ocean in view of the foaming of sea water, and the following results were obtained:
    1) The general features of the frequency distribution of wind speeds in the wind wave scale 3 were discussed (Section 3).
    2) He defined a quantity R0, which is physically signifi c ant, in order to discriminate the degree of foaming in actual seas how often the white-caps appear, where 0 represents the degree of surface water temperature. Using its values calculated from oceanographical data, he could ascertain that the higher the surface water temperature becomes, the lower the degree of foaming of sea water. This relationship coincided fairly well with the results of his previous report [1] (Section 4).
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  • On the Diurnal Variations in Air and Sea-Surface Temperatures
    M. Koizumi
    1956 Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 145-154
    Published: October 15, 1956
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The data used are of air and sea-surface temperatures observed every three hours at the Ocean Weather Stations “ Extra ” (39°N,153°E) and “ Tango ” (29°N,135°E). Average diurnal variations of air and sea-surface temperatures are examined for every month of the year. It is noticed that the diurnal variation of air tempeature at both stations presents a characteristic curve with a swelling in the forenoon. Seasonal changes are examined of characteristic parameters of diurnal variations, e. g. the range, the time of occurrence of extreme values, the time of occurrence of the values equal to the diurnal mean, etc. Diurnal variation of the temperature difference between the air and the sea surface is shown at the end.
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  • On a Short-Periodic Variation of Sea-Surface Temperature
    M. Koizumi
    1956 Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 155-160
    Published: October 15, 1956
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    On plotting the daily means of sea-surface temperature at the Ocean Weather Station “ Extra ” (39°N, 153°E) against time, we find that there are oscillations of the temperature with periods of few ten days. The periods of these temperature oscillations were determined. Among possible causes for these oscillations the meandering of ocean currents may be mentioned as the most probable one.
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  • The Turbulent Fluctuations in a Tidal Current
    T. Nan'niti
    1956 Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 161-170
    Published: October 15, 1956
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The component of turbulent velocity in the direction of the mean flow has been studied for the tidal current off Cape Kan'non. The periods of the turbulent fluctuations recorded varied from several seconds up to a few minutes and these fluctuations seem to be caused by turbulence. The ratio of mean amplitude of fluctuations to the mean current was greatest at the bottom and smallest at mid-depths. The calculated values of R(t), the auto-correlation coefficients, were seldom in accord with the theoretical result as 1-R(t)t2/3.
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  • The Effeets of Pressing Skin on Plethysmogram
    K. Kamiyama
    1956 Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 171-177
    Published: October 15, 1956
    Released: December 11, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Cold-, wind-, infra-red radia t ion-stimuli and that by putting on and off coverlets were given to sleeping children, and then their vasomotor reflex was observed.
    The measuring apparatus used was the plethysmograph the transducer of which was a strain-gauge. The stimuli caused by putting on and off the coverlets were accompanied by quickly followed variation on plethysmogram.
    Putting on the coverlets caused vasoconstriction, vascular system constricts, but no significant variation in vascular system is caused by thermal stimuli which bring no dynamic stimulus directly to the skin, such exposure to infra-red radiation.
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