The Journal of The Japanese Society of Balneology, Climatology and Physical Medicine
Online ISSN : 1884-3697
Print ISSN : 0029-0343
ISSN-L : 0029-0343
Volume 57 , Issue 3
Showing 1-7 articles out of 7 articles from the selected issue
  • Yoshiro TANIZAKI, Hikaru KITANI, Takashi MIFUNE, Fumihiro MITSUNOBU
    1994 Volume 57 Issue 3 Pages 183-190
    Published: 1994
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
  • Ippei WATANABE, Tadashi YANO, Kazu MORI, Syohachi TANZAWA
    1994 Volume 57 Issue 3 Pages 191-198
    Published: 1994
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Although De-qi sensation induced by acupuncture stimulation has been considered one of the conditions for good acupuncture effects, its physiological significance has not been clarified. Therefore, we examined the influence of De-qi sensation on the central nervous system (CNS) by measuring the event-related potential (ERP) induced by acupuncture stimulation.
    Tests were conducted on nine healthy adult males. Acupuncture stimulation was given to these subjects, and ERPs were collected from three locations of the head, Fz, Cz, and Pz, using both ear lobes as reference electrodes. For control data, surface electric stimulation was given to the same subjects and ERPs were collected from the same locations. Acupuncture stimuli or electric stimuli were given to the left-side LI10 32 times at random intervals of 4 to 7 sec. To analyze ERPs, ERPs in response to 32 trials were averaged using a DP 1100 system (a signal processor made by NEC SANEI, LTD.).
    The latency of the ERP triggered by acupuncture stimulation was approximately P350msec, while that of the ERP triggered by electric stimulation was found to be approximately P250msec, resulting in a difference of P100msec. These results suggest that the De-qi sensation induced by acupuncture stimulation may strongly influence the CNS functions, especially the processing recognition of CNS. It is suggested that this acupuncture stimuli related potential may not be p-LPC.
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  • Yoshiro TANIZAKI, Hikaru KITANI, Takashi MIFUNE, Fumihiro MITSUNOBU, K ...
    1994 Volume 57 Issue 3 Pages 199-208
    Published: 1994
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
  • Akihiro OZAKI, Hiromoto NAKANISHI, Masaki HIRO
    1994 Volume 57 Issue 3 Pages 209-216
    Published: 1994
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Topical cooling effects at the site of vibratory stimulation were studied using vibration-induced flexion reflex (VFR), which was induced simultaneously in both hands, as an indicator for assessment.
    As a result, it was found that the inhibition of ipsilateral and contralateral VFR related to topical cooling of the palmar vibratory site on one side was caused by cooling within a limited area of the palm where the vibratory element contacted. Application of acupunctural electrical stimulation of disrupting nature in place of topical cooling to the vibratory stimulation site on one side also effectively inhibited VFR on both sides.
    Although the skin temperature did not decrease on the side contralateral to the side that had been cooled, VFR was completely inhibited on both the cooled and uncooled sides.
    These results suggest that the peripheral impulses which arise from cooling the vibratory site on one side act on spinal interneurons and alpha-motor neurons, which contribute bilaterally to the VFR expression, thus inducing a neurogenic inhibitory effect on VFR.
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  • Ryoichi INABA, Haruo SUGIURA, Setsuya FUJITA, Hirotoshi IWATA
    1994 Volume 57 Issue 3 Pages 217-223
    Published: 1994
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    To explore the possibility of incorporating oriental medicine and medical hydrology in the educational programs of medical, nursing and pharmaceutical schools, a questionnaire on the attitude of medical students (group A, N=70; group B, N=77), nursing students (group C, N=64; group D, N=61) and pharmaceutical students (group E, N=172) who had not yet received any practical medical education was circulated. The results showed that about 50% of the students did not recognize the term “medical hydrology, ” and about 10% of them did not recognize the term “oriental medicine.” Seventy-five percent of the group A medical students and 93% of the group B medical students were interested in oriental medicine, and these rates were higher than those who were interested in medical hydrology (49% (67%)). About 50% of the nursing and pharmaceutical students were interested both in oriental medicine and medical hydrology. Eighty-two percent of group A and 86% of group B medical students hoped to attend lectures on oriental medicine, and these rates were higher than those among nursing and pharmaceutical students. Between 49% and 60% of the students of all three groups hoped to attend lectures on medical hydrology. This rate was lower than that of those who hoped to attend lectures on oriental medicine. In general, the rate of those who had a positive image of oriental medicine was higher among medical and pharmaceutical students. However, there were no significant differences in the rates of those who had a positive image of medical hydrology among different groups of students. In all student groups, the rate of those who answered that both oriental medicine and medical hydrology are “relatively effective” was the highest.
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  • Taketo KIMURA
    1994 Volume 57 Issue 3 Pages 224-228
    Published: 1994
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A survey was made on the bathing habits of 36 male alcoholics who were outpatients of my clinic.
    The following results were obtained.
    1) Eighty-three percent of these patients had a habit of bathing while drunk.
    2) Although most of patients (94.4%) were aware of the risk of bathing after taking alcohol, they thought it was safe for themselves.
    3) Thirty-three percent of the patients had circulatory diseases such as hypertension and arrythmia and 16.7% had liver cirrhosis.
    4) When bathing after taking alcohol, 30.0% of the patients (9) felt subjective symptoms (palpitation in 5 patients, dizziness in 3, and fast breathing in 1). Six of these patients had experienced hypertension.
    Alcoholism often recurs, and patients with alcoholism become heavy drinkers easily. To prevent complications in connection with alcoholism and to improve their quality of life, I believe an education program is necessary to teach them the dangers of bathing while drunk.
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  • D. Krasteva, L. Vladeva, Y. Yordanova
    1994 Volume 57 Issue 3 Pages 229-232
    Published: 1994
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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