Bulletin of the Society of Sea Water Science, Japan
Online ISSN : 2185-9213
Print ISSN : 0369-4550
ISSN-L : 0369-4550
Volume 43 , Issue 2
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from the selected issue
  • Shunichiro UCHIDA
    1989 Volume 43 Issue 2 Pages 65-92
    Published: 1989
    Released: February 19, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Takashi SUZUKI
    1989 Volume 43 Issue 2 Pages 93-100
    Published: 1989
    Released: February 19, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Takehiko CHIGUSA
    1989 Volume 43 Issue 2 Pages 101-106
    Published: 1989
    Released: February 19, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Crystal growing technique from the solution having consistency requires the control of both growing and dissolving HOUGA-an intermediate substance between liquid and solid phases, and is observed as an associated solute molecules. However, it is difficult to express clearly the crystal growing technique from the solution having no consistency.
    In this experiment, the behavior of solute molecules is examined by absorbance spectra using supersaturated NaCl solution to study the solute molecule behavior in the solution having no consistency. The data that enable the recognition of the change in refraction index concentration in long wave region and the assumption of the existence of associated solute molecules (HOUGA) in the short wave length are obtained.
    This report details the assumption that the following three states are generated in the solution from the data obtained through the experiment.
    1) There are substances in the solution that indicate the concentration (D) and concentration (H) of the solute molecule, where concentration (D) is the concentration of solution, and concen-tration (H) is the concentration of HOUGA.
    2) The solute molecules move about between the concentration (D) and the concentration (H).
    3) It is difficult to estimate the concentration (H) from the concentration (D).
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  • Atsuko SHIMADA, Tatsue SATO, Yohko HAMADA, Keiko HATAE
    1989 Volume 43 Issue 2 Pages 107-114
    Published: 1989
    Released: February 19, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Effects of salt substitutions on taste and texture were studied by sellsory tests and texture measurements.
    In the case of water solution, if more than 10% or more than 5% of the sodium chloride was replaced with potassium chloride or with magnesium chloride, respectively, panel members judged the taste to be significantly less salty than sodium chloride solution. And if more than 50% or more than 15% of the sodium chloride was replaced with potassium chloride or with magnesium chloride, respectively, taste was judged to be bitter and unpreferable. When “umalniseasoning” was added to the water solution, salty taste was weakened.
    When cooked in the solution of salt containing potassium chloride, stickiness of rice decreased. When the solution in which potassium chloride replaced more than 30% of sodium chloride was used, cooked rice and boiled potato were less salty, and especially if potassium chloride replaced 50%, they were not tasty. If magnesium chloride replaced 10% or 15% of sodium hloride, cqoked rice became not glossy, and boiled potato became hard and bitter, and if magnesium chloride replaced 15% of sodium chloride, cooked rice was less salty.
    Two commercial salts were compared with sodium chloride. No difference was seen in the ef-fects between “Amajio” and sodium chloride.“Shioberashi 65”was less salty, had unpleasant taste, and was disliked.
    From these results, to decrease sodium chloride intake, 30% or 5% of sodium chloride can be replaced with potassium chloride or magnesium chloride, respectively, without any effect on the taste or the texture.
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  • Takeshi KANO
    1989 Volume 43 Issue 2 Pages 115-127
    Published: 1989
    Released: February 19, 2013
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