Industrial Health
Online ISSN : 1880-8026
Print ISSN : 0019-8366
ISSN-L : 0019-8366
Volume 11 , Issue 3
Showing 1-11 articles out of 11 articles from the selected issue
  • Toshio KAKIZAKI
    1973 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 77-83
    Published: 1973
    Released: April 17, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Effect of unpleasant feeling due to pure sound (4000 Hz) on stress response result-ing from performance of mental tasks were investigated. Under four environmental conditions consisted of three sound pressure levels (70, 80, 90 dB) of pure sound and a 40 dB of a background fan-noise (control condition), an "addition-subtraction task" of two figures was assigned to the subjects for 15 min at the maximum performance rate in each condition.
    In a control experiment where the subjects were not at task, any appreciable change was not found out in 16 physiological indices under the four conditions. The pure sound also hardly affected the physiological indices of the subjects at the task except a little decline in the serum levels of proteins which is rather an opposite change of that in the stress response. The pure sound gave rise to a fairly unpleas-ant feeling in the subjects whether at task or not, but had no effect on performance or error of the task.
    Then the results showed that unpleasant feelings due to ordinary environments will be scarcely influencial on both the stress response and task performance of men at such mental tasks.
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  • Kazuo SAITO, Toshio SATO, Yuji SATO, Kozo NIIZUMA
    1973 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 85-93
    Published: 1973
    Released: April 17, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The concentration of lead in the whole blood of 203 traffic policemen, whose mean value and standard error of lead content in blood showed 9.60±0.22 (95% upper limit of 13.7) μg/100 ml of blood, differed from the large in scale of cities at low lead con-centration less than 10 μg/m3 of air.
    In comparison between traffic policemen and lead workers, the latter were signifi-cantly higher at the lead content and ALAD activity in erythrocytes than those of the former. The correlation between ALAD activity in erythrocytes and lead con-centration in blood was found in both workers, but among the samples under 15.0 μg pb/100 ml of blood in traffic policemen was not observed significant decrease of ALAD activity and any correlation.
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  • Sumiko ISHIZU, Masayasu MINAMI, Kotaro YAMAMURA
    1973 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 95-104
    Published: 1973
    Released: April 17, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Heinz body was studied morphologically using the histochemical and electro-microscopic methods. The result shows that one of the chemical components of Heinz body is denaturated hemoglobin and the methemoglobin formation will precipitate Heinz body development.
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  • Ayako KOJIMA-SUDO
    1973 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 105-112
    Published: 1973
    Released: April 17, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Adrenaline and noradrenaline in alumina extract of human urine were measured with an ion exchange chromatography and an automated fluorometric determination. A few ng of adrenaline was detected by this method. The recoveries of adrenaline and noradrenaline added to alumina extract of urine were 83 and 96%, respectively. It was shown that some compounds in alumina extract of urine interfere with the differential fluorometric, method for the determination of catecholamines widely used, but there was recognized almost no interference in this chromatographic method. Therefore, the present method is considered to give more accurate values of urinary adrenaline and noradrenaline than the differential fluorometric method.
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  • Hiroshi YOSHIKAWA
    1973 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 113-119
    Published: 1973
    Released: April 17, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    It was previously reported that mice pretreated with small doses of cadmium developed a tolerance to a subsequent acute cadmium poisoning. The present experi- ment intended to explain this tolerance mechanism by an animal experiment.
    Male rats were used as experimental animals, of which one group was adminis- tered intraperitoneally 0.6 mg cadmium per kg of body weight as pretreatment and 24 hr later 3 mg cadmium per kg of body weight was injected intraperitoneally as challenging. Another group was injected with 3 mg cadmium per kg intraperitoneally. About all rats, the determination of cadmium was made in each organ, urine, and feces for 7 days after challenging.
    In the pretreatment group, it was recognized that the cadmium contents in liver increased remarkably compared with nonpretreatment group, on the contrary, the cadmium content in blood, especially in serum, and in other organs, and the amount of cadmium excreted in urine decreased in pretreatment group compared with non-pretreatment group.
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  • Sushil Kumar TANDON
    1973 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 121-125
    Published: 1973
    Released: April 17, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The relative site of manganese accumulation and the effects of dose and duration of manganese treatment on its distribution in different organs of rat have been in-vestigated. The pancreas was found to be the chief site of manganese accumulation followed by liver, kidney and brain. The concentration of manganese was found to be directly proportional to the dose injected for all the organs. With any dose the accumulation of this metal increased upto 30 days in pancreas and brain, while it did not change significantly after 20 days in liver and kidney.
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  • Sumiko ISHIZU, Masayasu MINAMI, Akio SUZUKI, Mineko YAMADA, Minoru SAT ...
    1973 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 127-139
    Published: 1973
    Released: April 17, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Administration of 5 mg per kilogram of cadmium chloride to pregnant mice on 7 days of gestation produced a variety of malformations in the surviving fetuses.
    Exencephaly was found most among the fetuses and such exencephalic fetuses also often exhibited open eye.
    Clefts palate and lack of tail or rachischisis were also found in some other fetuses.
    Skeletal malformations were observed in the skull region, vertebral parts, ribs and tails.
    The total rate of malformation appearance exceeded about 80%.
    The less the dosis of cadmium chloride, the less the rate of malformation appear-ance: 19% for 2.5 mg/kg 1.0% or less for 0.63 mg/kg and none for 0.33 mg/kg.
    The quantities of cadmium in the liver, the kidneys and the placentas of the mother animals and fetuses were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.
    The cadmium content in the liver of cadmium chloride injected mother animal was 800 times greater than the control animal, that in the kidneys was 450 times and that in the placenta 10 times, but measurable amount of cadmium was not de-tected among fetuses of cadmium chloride injected mice.
    Above mentioned fact expresses that cadmium chloride in the late pregnancy does not transfer through the placenta and stays in the mother's side.
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  • Michio OGAWA, Shuji SHIMAZAKI, Kikushi KATSURADA, Tsuyoshi SUGIMOTO
    1973 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 141-143
    Published: 1973
    Released: April 17, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Hiroyuki SAKABE
    1973 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 145-148
    Published: 1973
    Released: April 17, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Tomoyo MIYAMA, Taeko ASAKURA, Taiichiro TAKEMOTOT, Suguyoshi SUZUKI
    1973 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 149-153
    Published: 1973
    Released: April 17, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The extractability of mercury in hair with hydrochloric acid differed dependent upon the time-interval between the shearing of hair and the measurement1). We had not exactly known what was the cause having made the difference, but the fact that the rate of nonextractable amount of mercury to the total was larger according to the time span after shearing, has suggested the change of chemical form of mercurials in hair or the difference in the intake of different mercury compounds at the old times. To get further information related to this problem, the selective estimation of inorganic and organic mercury, which is applicable to the hair sample, should be useful. We have already measured the inorganic mer-cury and the total mercury in cases of urine, blood and tissue homogenate, that is basically an application of Magos and Cernik's method2), but this measurement has been practical only after the HCl-extraction in the case of hair. We need a method which is capable in selective measurement of inorganic and organic mer-cury in hair. In this connection, a new method developed by Magos3), in which the homogenate of skin and fur was prepared without decomposing the organic mercury, is promising. Then, we intend to compare contents of inorganic and organic mercury in the HCl-extract with those in the digested specimens by sodium hydroxide in human hair.
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  • Noboru HARA
    1973 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 155-156
    Published: 1973
    Released: April 17, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Lead dusts in air are captured on filter paper, and the concentration of lead in air can be determined by coloring lead on the paper. One of such methods was investigated by Quino1). His method has been used widely, because it is very simple and convenient. But if captured dust contains much of soot or other contamination in it, the determination of lead becomes difficult by this method. In such cases, the author recommends the following procedure which modifies this method a little. At first, lead captured on filter paper is dissolved in the buffer solution. Then the solution is developed along the glass plate using the method of thin layer chromatography, and the lead in the solution is absorped on the plate. Lead is colored on the plate and is determinrd by comparing the deepness of color.
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