JOURNAL OF DENTAL HEALTH
Online ISSN : 2189-7379
Print ISSN : 0023-2831
ISSN-L : 0023-2831
Current issue
Jan. 2020
Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
  • Junko KAWANISHI, Koichiro JIN
    Type: research-article
    2020 Volume 70 Issue 1 Pages 11-18
    Published: 2020
    Released: February 15, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     School age is the period of life when children make the transition from heteronymous to autonomous health promotion, and in the area of dental and oral health, it is an important period in which children acquire the skills for independently implementing appropriate oral disease preventive behavior. In order to promote proper oral health care behavior, it is therefore necessary to clarify the primary factors that relate to such behavior, and give appropriate encouragement with regard to these primary factors.

     The principal aim of the present study was to investigate how dental and oral health behavior relates to self-esteem and health locus of control, in order to develop effective school dental health education programs for junior high school students.

     The subjects were third-year students enrolled in a junior high school in 2015, with 152 subjects analyzed. The survey items included tooth brushing frequency, “points of attention” and “confirmation” in relation to subjective tooth brushing behavior, frequency of consumption of sweet food and beverages, self-esteem, and health locus of control.

     The result showed that among boys, there was a significant positive correlation between “confirmation” and internal control, and a significant relationship was seen between frequency of eating sweet foods and internal control. Among girls, frequency of “continuously eating snacks” showed a significant relationship with internal control, and although it was not significant, “points of attention” was related to “family” self-esteem and internal control.

     These results suggest the necessity of the following actions to be taken during the junior high school period: 1. introduction of school dental health education that encourages the formation of self-esteem;, and 2. dental and oral health interventions that take into account the health locus of control tendencies of the individual.

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  • Amir BAIGI, Kjell RANDOW, Rose-Marie WIDOLF-KROON, Masaki KAMBARA, Lar ...
    Type: research-article
    2020 Volume 70 Issue 1 Pages 19-26
    Published: 2020
    Released: February 15, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     Caries risk assessment for adult patients with a prosthodontic need can identify risks associated with dental caries prevalence. The primary aim of this study was to identify and validate different risk items associated with the caries risk in adults receiving prosthodontic rehabilitation. The study had a retrospective design with caries data on 127 adult patients, 61 men and 66 women, aged between 30 and 88 years requiring fixed prosthodontic rehabilitation. Factor analysis followed by multiple logistic regression was used to identify factors of importance. Factor analysis identified six factors: Health, Behavior, Technical quality, Saliva, Bacteria, and Dental history. Cronbach’s alpha values varied between 0.66 and 0.93. The factors Health (OR 0.90; CI 0.82–0.99) and Bacteria (OR 1.12; CI 1.02–1.23) showed a significant correlation with caries prevalence: decayed, missing, and filled surfaces (DMFS). Relevant risk items were tested and found to be associated with DMFS. In conclusion, Health and Bacteria items may play a significant role in caries risk in adults receiving fixed prosthodontic rehabilitation.

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  • Erhua SHANG, Taiji NOGUCHI, Yoshimi NAKAYAMA
    Type: research-article
    2020 Volume 70 Issue 1 Pages 27-34
    Published: 2020
    Released: February 15, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     Background: We investigated the factors associated with having fewer than 20 teeth among community-dwelling older women in Nagoya City.

     Methods: The present cross-sectional study recruited women aged 65 years or older who participated in a health exercise class held in Nagoya City between July and August 2016. The health status and lifestyle factors were assessed by a self-reported questionnaire. Data from 493 older women were analyzed. We performed multivariable logistic regression analysis to examine the factors associated with having fewer than 20 teeth, based on 10 items regarding physical, phycological, nutritional, and social aspects.

     Results: Compared with women who had 20 teeth or more, the participants with fewer than 20 teeth were older, more likely to live alone, and had more difficulty putting on pants while standing. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that having fewer than 20 teeth was significantly correlated with obesity, living alone, and difficulty putting on pants while standing.

     Conclusion: The present study revealed that obesity, living alone, and difficulty putting on pants while standing were factors associated with tooth loss among older women living in urban areas.

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  • Emiko NAKANO, Naoki YOSHIDA, Akihiro YOSHIHARA
    Type: research-article
    2020 Volume 70 Issue 1 Pages 35-43
    Published: 2020
    Released: February 15, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     The objective of this study was to identify factors influencing the dental health of patients on a ketogenic diet to treat epilepsy. The study was conducted from July 2015 to August 2016 involving inpatients or outpatients with epilepsy of the National Epilepsy Center, Shizuoka Institute of Epilepsy and Neurological Disorders. We administered a face-to-face interview on lifestyle and dental hygiene, performed oral observations, and collected clinical information. Fifty-one children (27 boys and 24 girls, 1 to 14 years of age, mean age: 6.7 years) were included in the analyses. Two adults were excluded. Fifteen children on a ketogenic diet for epilepsy (diet therapy group) were compared with 36 children receiving non-diet epilepsy therapy (control group). No significant differences were observed between the 2 groups in the presence of questionable caries for observation, presence of signs of gum inflammation, presence of signs of gingival hyperplasia, presence of a family dentist, or the oral health behavior. Three guardians (20.0%) in the diet therapy group and no guardian (0%) in the control group were concerned about their children’s bruxism, and a significant difference was observed between the 2 groups (p=0.030). Six guardians (40.0%) in the diet therapy group and 6 guardians (16.7%) in the control group were concerned about the color of their children’s teeth, but no significant difference was observed between the 2 groups (p=0.079). We did not investigate their teeth discoloration in detail, and thus could not determine the cause of such discoloration in this study. The discoloration of their teeth is one of the issues to be solved in the future. In the diet therapy group, there was one guardian who avoided the use of dentifrice due to it containing sweeteners, and it was suggested that we should provide information on dentifrice so that it can be used with confidence.

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