GEOGRAPHICAL SCIENCES
Online ISSN : 2432-096X
Print ISSN : 0286-4886
ISSN-L : 0286-4886
Volume 57 , Issue 2
Showing 1-14 articles out of 14 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2002 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages Cover1-
    Published: April 28, 2002
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2002 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages Cover2-
    Published: April 28, 2002
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (30K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2002 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages App1-
    Published: April 28, 2002
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Kazuaki SUGIYAMA
    Type: Article
    2002 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages 73-89
    Published: April 28, 2002
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this paper is to explain how the myth of new `harmful' environments for juveniles was constructed through discourses of local newspapers and how related practices were regulated spatially by the juvenile protection ordinance. In particular, this paper focuses on social problems concerning the regulation of Telephone Dating Services in Toyama Prefecture, Japan during 1993-1998. Around 1993, the residents gradually begun to center .their concern around the location of Telephone Dating Services in urban spaces because they resulted in harmful influences on juveniles. Dating services have different businesses styles, but their main purpose is to mediate between men and women using telecommunications. Schoolgirls who use such services, especially high school girls 15-18 years old, actively meet unknown men. The local daily newspapers reported these incidents often and these incidents have increasingly become the focus of local police. Since residents have made these claims, it has become necessary for local government to protect juveniles from such harmful environments. Neighborhood residents thought that keeping juveniles away from such environments and abolishing these harmful influences were necessary. Most of the institutional responses from neighborhood watch groups have included attempts to prevent girls from suffering sexual abuses committed by vicious men. To put it simply, it was merely the result of stereotyped discourses in the coverage of local newspapers that revitalized the movement to exclude these kinds of the services in urban spaces. The police department has integrated many groups related to rural society into movements to purify such environments and many neighborhoods have signed petitions to regulate such services in order to create a place that was constituted by subjects and spaces that were considered unpolluted. Therefore the regulation was enforced more quickly in Toyama Prefecture than nationally.
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  • Kazunobu TSUTSUI, Satomi SATO
    Type: Article
    2002 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages 90-104
    Published: April 28, 2002
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Since the end of the Second World War, rural Japan has experienced continuing depopulation. To revitalize rural areas, local governments have attempted to promote interregional exchanges. One important policy measure for such exchanges is to hold rural products fairs in urban areas. In general, the major purpose of these fairs is to introduce and sell products to new markets. The purpose of our study is to examine whether these fairs can play an effective and practical role in promoting interregional exchanges by focusing on the actors who plan and participate in these fairs. As a case for this study, we chose to examine some rural products fairs of Yamagata Prefecture which were held in several department stores in Osaka City. The results of our study are as follows. First, for every department store, the fairs serve as an important means for sales promotion. Therefore such the fair tends to lack the element of entertainment. The local governments put an importance not on entertaining the visitors but on selling rural products because they cannot ignore the intention of department stores. Second, the companies that participate in the fairs not only pursue the sale of rural products for the purpose of market expansion, but also intend to enlarge interregional exchanges by displaying rural products. Our analysis of visitors' preferences shows that visitors expect to experience a rural atmosphere as well as to purchase rural products. They also tend to become interested in Yamagata Prefecture after they visit the fairs. Our study concludes that rural products fairs seem to contribute to the promotion of interregional exchanges.
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  • Takuji HAMADA
    Type: Article
    2002 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages 105-119
    Published: April 28, 2002
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Through examining the multiple ideals of craft in Japan, and extracting fundamental data from description and depictions in tourist guidebooks, it is possible to view the social milieu surrounding Japanese craft (in particular, ceramics ) in the last century. Art policies in Meiji era Japan attempted to sub-divided craft into artistic and industrial modes. However clear differentiation couldn't be realized, and eventually, the conceptualization of craft metamorphosed into a concept with aspects of both. Through this paper, I attempt to re-think such ideals of craft with regard to geographical location research. Japanese geographical studies of craft have frequently investigated it solely from an industrial perspective, particularly on a local scale, and the chief focus of these studies is economic in nature. However this is only one side of craft practice and ideal, and it is important to include the artistic side of craft as well. In this paper, my investigation focuses on the role of craft in tourism instead of local industry, capturing the cultural and artistic side of craft. In particular, I deal with ceramics of Kyusyu as an example, tracing their depiction in tourist guidebooks, through looking over guidebooks of Kyushu published for the last 10 decades (Table 1). As a result, I can distinguish 64 kinds of ceramics in the Kyushu area (Figure 1; Table 2). And I reveal a non-economic side of craft from Table 2 as a fundamental data.
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2002 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages 120-137
    Published: April 28, 2002
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2002 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages 138-139
    Published: April 28, 2002
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2002 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages 139-143
    Published: April 28, 2002
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2002 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages 144-152
    Published: April 28, 2002
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2002 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages 153-154
    Published: April 28, 2002
    Released: April 20, 2017
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    Download PDF (116K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2002 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages App2-
    Published: April 28, 2002
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (90K)
  • Type: Cover
    2002 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages Cover3-
    Published: April 28, 2002
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (35K)
  • Type: Cover
    2002 Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages Cover4-
    Published: April 28, 2002
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (35K)
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