Neurologia medico-chirurgica
Online ISSN : 1349-8029
Print ISSN : 0470-8105
ISSN-L : 0470-8105
Volume 56 , Issue 10
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
Review Article
  • Naoki TOMA
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 10 Pages 585-591
    Published: 2016
    Released: October 15, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: June 08, 2016
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    There are considerable variations in the anatomy of the human ophthalmic artery (OphA), such as anomalous origins of the OphA and anastomoses between the OphA and the adjacent arteries. These anatomical variations seem to attribute to complex embryology of the OphA. In human embryos and fetuses, primitive dorsal and ventral ophthalmic arteries (PDOphA and PVOphA) form the ocular branches, and the supraorbital division of the stapedial artery forms the orbital branches of the OphA, and then numerous anastomoses between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the external carotid artery (ECA) systems emerge in connection with the OphA. These developmental processes can produce anatomical variations of the OphA, and we should notice these variations for neurosurgical and neurointerventional procedures.
    Download PDF (816K)
Special Topic
  • Hideo SHICHINOHE, Kiyohiro HOUKIN
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 10 Pages 592-596
    Published: 2016
    Released: October 15, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: June 10, 2016
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    Stroke is still a leading cause of death and disability, and despite intensive research, few treatment options exist. A recent breakthrough in cell therapy is expected to reverse the neurological sequelae of stroke. Although some pioneer studies on the use of cell therapy for the treatment of stroke have been reported, certain problems still remain unsolved. We investigated the use of autologous bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplantation for the treatment of stroke, to develop it as the next-generation cell therapy. In this study, we introduce the preparation of a new clinical trial, the Research on Advanced Intervention using Novel Bone marrow stem cell (RAINBOW) study. The trial will start in 2016, and we hope that it will not only be helpful for treating patients but also for clarifying the therapeutic mechanisms. Moreover, we review stem cell therapeutics as an emerging paradigm in stroke (STEPS) and the guidelines for the development of cell therapy for stroke in the United States as well as introduce the development of new guidelines in Japan. These guidelines are expected to encourage the development of cell therapy for stroke management.
    Download PDF (344K)
Review Article
  • Hirofumi NAKATOMI, Satoru MIYAWAKI, Taichi KIN, Nobuhito SAITO
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 10 Pages 597-604
    Published: 2016
    Released: October 15, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: July 26, 2016
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Auditory brainstem implant (ABI) technology attempts to restore hearing in deaf patients caused by bilateral cochlear nerve injury through the direct stimulation of the brainstem, but many aspects of the related mechanisms remain unknown. The unresolved issues can be grouped into three topics: which patients are the best candidates; which type of electrode should be used; and how to improve restored hearing. We evaluated our experience with 11 cases of ABI placement. We found that if at least seven of eleven electrodes of the MED-EL ABI are effectively placed in a patient with no deformation of the fourth ventricle, open set sentence recognition of approximately 20% and closed set word recognition of approximately 65% can be achieved only with the ABI. Appropriate selection of patients for ABI placement can lead to good outcomes. Further investigation is required regarding patient selection criteria and methods of surgery for effective ABI placement.

    Download PDF (2846K)
Special Topic
  • Takashi MORISHITA, Tooru INOUE
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 10 Pages 605-612
    Published: 2016
    Released: October 15, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: September 08, 2016
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Interactive bio-feedback (iBF) was initially developed for the rehabilitation of motor function in patients with neurological disorders, and subsequently yielded the development of the hybrid assistive limb (HAL). Here, we provide a review of the theory underlying HAL treatment as well as our clinical experience and recommendations for future clinical studies using HAL in acute stroke patients. We performed a PubMed-based literature search, a retrospective data review of our acute stroke case series, and included a sample case report of our findings. Given past animal studies and functional imaging results, iBF therapy using the HAL in the acute phase of stroke seems an appropriate approach for preventing learned non-use and interhemispheric excitation imbalances. iBF therapy may furthermore promote appropriate neuronal network reorganization. Based on experiences in our stroke center, HAL rehabilitation is a safe and effective treatment modality for recovering motor impairments after acute stroke, and allows the design of tailored rehabilitation programs for individual patients. iBF therapy through the HAL system seems to be an effective and promising approach to stroke rehabilitation; however, the superiority of this treatment to conventional rehabilitation remains unclear. Further clinical studies are warranted. Additionally, the formation of a patient registry will permit a meta-analysis of HAL cases and address the problems associated with a controlled trial (e.g., the heterogeneity of an acute stroke cohort). The development of robotic engineering will improve the efficacy of HAL rehabilitation and has the potential to standardize patient rehabilitation practice.

    Download PDF (1278K)
Review Articles
  • Atsushi UMEMURA, Genko OYAMA, Yasushi SHIMO, Madoka NAKAJIMA, Asuka NA ...
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 10 Pages 613-625
    Published: 2016
    Released: October 15, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: June 24, 2016
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    There is a long history of surgical treatment for Parkinson disease (PD). After pioneering trials and errors, the current primary surgical treatment for PD is deep brain stimulation (DBS). DBS is a promising treatment option for patients with medically refractory PD. However, there are still many problems and controversies associated with DBS. In this review, we discuss current issues in DBS for PD, including patient selection, clinical outcomes, complications, target selection, long-term outcomes, management of axial symptoms, timing of surgery, surgical procedures, cost-effectiveness, and new technology.
    Download PDF (336K)
  • Yuichi KUBOTA, Hidetoshi NAKAMOTO, Takakazu KAWAMATA
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 10 Pages 626-631
    Published: 2016
    Released: October 15, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: August 31, 2016
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Herein, we review the current state of nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). NCSE has recently been recognized as one of the causes of unexplained impaired consciousness in the neurosurgical or neurocritical setting. The causes of NCSE include not only central nervous system disorders such as craniotomy, stroke, traumatic brain injury, and central nervous system inflammation, but also severe critical conditions such as sepsis and uremia, among others. NCSE shows no overt clinical manifestations; therefore, prompt and correct diagnosis is difficult. The diagnosis of NCSE should be made by electroencephalogram (EEG), especially continuous EEG (CEEG) monitoring, because NCSE is caught only by prolonged recording. However, the interpretation of the EEG findings is also challenging because of the varying EEG characteristic of NCSE. While the diagnosis should be based on temporal or spatial EEG changes, several definitions and criteria have been proposed, and uniform, universal criteria are still lacking. Once NCSE is diagnosed, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) should be aggressively administrated. Although there are no standardized international therapeutic guidelines, several AEDs have been attempted in clinical practice in other countries, including fosphenytoin, midazolam, levetiracetam, and valproate. Particularly, several AEDs should be considered prior to using anesthetics. Finally, the prognosis of NCSE depends on the cause thereof; however, in general, earlier intervention for NCSE appears important in terms of better recovery.

    Download PDF (1451K)
  • Masaki IWASAKI, Kazutaka JIN, Nobukazu NAKASATO, Teiji TOMINAGA
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 10 Pages 632-640
    Published: 2016
    Released: October 15, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: September 14, 2016
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Epilepsy surgery is aimed to remove the brain tissues that are indispensable for generating patient’s epileptic seizures. There are two purposes in the pre-operative evaluation: localization of the epileptogenic zone and localization of function. Surgery is planned to remove possible epileptogenic zone while preserving functional area. Since no single diagnostic modality is superior to others in identifying and localizing the epileptogenic zone, multiple non-invasive evaluations are performed to estimate the location of the epileptogenic zone after concordance between evaluations. Essential components of non-invasive pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy include detailed clinical history, long-term video-electroencephalography monitoring, epilepsy-protocol magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and neuropsychological testing. However, a significant portion of drug-resistant epilepsy is associated with no or subtle MRI lesions or with ambiguous electro-clinical signs. Additional evaluations including fluoro-deoxy glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), magnetoencephalography and ictal single photon emission computed tomography can play critical roles in planning surgery. FDG-PET should be registered on three-dimensional MRI for better detection of focal cortical dysplasia. All diagnostic tools are complementary to each other in defining the epileptogenic zone, so that it is always important to reassess the data based on other results to pick up or confirm subtle abnormalities.

    Download PDF (1808K)
  • Akio MORITA, Shigeo SORA, Hirofumi NAKATOMI, Kanako HARADA, Naohiko SU ...
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 10 Pages 641-652
    Published: 2016
    Released: October 15, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: July 26, 2016
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Robotics and medical engineering can convert traditional surgery into digital and scientific procedures. Here, we describe our work to develop microsurgical robotic systems and apply engineering technology to assess microsurgical skills. With the collaboration of neurosurgeons and an engineering team, we have developed two types of microsurgical robotic systems. The first, the deep surgical systems, enable delicate surgical procedures such as vessel suturing in a deep and narrow space. The second type allows for super-fine surgical procedures such as anastomosing artificial vessels of 0.3 mm in diameter. Both systems are constructed with master and slave manipulator robots connected to local area networks. Robotic systems allowed for secure and accurate procedures in a deep surgical field. In cadaveric models, these systems showed a good potential of being useful in actual human surgeries, but mechanical refinements in thickness and durability are necessary for them to be established as clinical systems. The super-fine robotic system made the very intricate surgery possible and will be applied in clinical trials. Another trial included the digitization of surgical technique and scientific analysis of surgical skills. Robotic and human hand motions were analyzed in numerical fashion as we tried to define surgical skillfulness in a digital format. Engineered skill assessment is also feasible and should be useful for microsurgical training. Robotics and medical engineering should bring science into the surgical field and training of surgeons. Active collaboration between medical and engineering teams and academic and industry groups is mandatory to establish such medical systems to improve patient care.

    Download PDF (6216K)
Editorial Committee
feedback
Top