Neurologia medico-chirurgica
Online ISSN : 1349-8029
Print ISSN : 0470-8105
ISSN-L : 0470-8105
Volume 58 , Issue 12
Showing 1-3 articles out of 3 articles from the selected issue
Original Articles
  • Hiroyuki SHIBA, Koji TAKEUCHI, Ryo HIRAMATSU, Motomasa FURUSE, Naosuke ...
    2018 Volume 58 Issue 12 Pages 487-494
    Published: 2018
    Released: December 15, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: November 21, 2018
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Recurrent malignant gliomas (RMGs) are difficult to control, and no standard protocol has been established for their treatment. At our institute, we have often treated RMGs by tumor-selective particle radiation called boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). However, despite the cell-selectivity of BNCT, brain radiation necrosis (BRN) may develop and cause severe neurological complications and sometimes death. This is partly due to the full-dose X-ray treatments usually given earlier in the treatment course. To overcome BRN following BNCT, recent studies have used bevacizumab (BV). We herein used extended BV treatment beginning just after BNCT to confer protection against or ameliorate BRN, and evaluated; the feasibility, efficacy, and BRN control of this combination treatment. Seven patients with RMGs (grade 3 and 4 cases) were treated with BNCT between June 2013 and May 2014, followed by successive BV treatments. They were followed-up to December 2017. Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) after combination treatment were 15.1 and 5.4 months, respectively. In one case, uncontrollable brain edema occurred and ultimately led to death after BV was interrupted due to meningitis. In two other cases, symptomatic aggravation of BRN occurred after interruption of BV treatment. No BRN was observed during the observation period in the other cases. Common terminology criteria for adverse events grade 2 and 3 proteinuria occurred in two cases and necessitated the interruption of BV treatments. Boron neutron capture therapy followed by BV treatments well-prevented or well-controlled BRN with prolonged OS and acceptable incidence of adverse events in our patients with RMG.

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  • Hirotoshi IMAMURA, Nobuyuki SAKAI, Tetsu SATOW, Koji IIHARA, JR-NET in ...
    2018 Volume 58 Issue 12 Pages 495-502
    Published: 2018
    Released: December 15, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: November 21, 2018
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

    Endovascular treatments for vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage are typically performed for patients who are refractory to recommended medical therapies. We analyzed the current status of endovascular treatments based on the data of Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET)3, and evaluated factors related to improvement of imaging findings and neurological condition, and to mechanical hemorrhage complications. We collected data of 1211 treatments performed from 2010 to 2014. Target vessels for treatments were anterior circulation (n = 1079), posterior circulation (n = 91), and both (n = 32); the distribution of vasospasm was the proximal vessel (n = 754) to the Circle of Willis, distal vessel (n = 329), and both (n = 119). Of the treatments, 948 cases (78.3%) were intra-arterial administration of vasodilators and 259 (21.4%) were percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA); 879 cases were the first intervention. The treatment time from onset was within 3 h in 378 (31.2%) cases, between 3 and 6 h in 349 (28.8%) cases, and over 6 h in 245 (20.2%) cases. The statistically significant factors associated with improvement on imaging findings was the first treatment, and treatment within 3 h from onset compared with that after 6 h. Additionally, the first and early treatments after the symptoms were associated with significantly improved neurological condition. All complications of mechanical hemorrhage occurred along with PTA. The findings show that endovascular treatment for vasospasm was effective, especially for cases who suffered from symptomatic vasospasm with a short interval after onset.

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