Journal of Geography (Chigaku Zasshi)
Online ISSN : 1884-0884
Print ISSN : 0022-135X
ISSN-L : 0022-135X
Volume 90 , Issue 1
Showing 1-7 articles out of 7 articles from the selected issue
  • Tetsuya KAWABE, Keiichiro OHNO, Shiro MAEDA
    1981 Volume 90 Issue 1 Pages 1-13
    Published: February 25, 1981
    Released: October 13, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    1) This research was carried out, in order to clarify the stratigraphic relationship between the Katsuura and the Kurotaki Formations, particular attention being given to the tephra key bed known in the Katsuura district, which is named Kr in this article. The tephra key bed, outcropping in the area around Kasugadai and the Katsuura Bridge, in Katsuura city, was dealt as typical Kr.
    2) In the eastern part of the area, the strike of Kr runs NNE-SSW, but ENEWSW in the western part. Since Kr is cut by several normal faults, its distribution is slided horizontally and vertically.
    3) The tephra key bed (Kr) consists of three members, KRl, KRm and KRu, in ascending order. Among them, KRm, the middle one, is divided into five beds, m0, m1, m2, m3 and m4.
    4) Kr extends from the east, where Katsuura Formation is distributed, to the west where the Kurotaki Formation is distributed, through the Ishikiri and the Aiyama valleys. In the Aiyama valley, Kr is situated stratigraphically about 8m above the plane of the Kurotaki unconformity, but Kr disappears at the cliffs cut by the city-road about 0.6km to the west of the Aiyama valley.
    5) Each member of Kr becomes thinner in the western part than in the eastern part. At Matsube its total thickness is about 12m, but becomes about 9m in the Ishikiri valley, and about 4.5m in the Aiyama valley.
    6) In the western part of Kr, its rock characteristic changes distinctly and becomes the facies of the coarsegrained tuffaceous sandstone with the pumice and the scoria.
    7) If Kr is considered as a standard horizon, the Kurotaki Formation, in the Kurogahana area in the most-eastern part of the district, could be regarded to be the lowest horizon in its distribution, and also as the oldest. On the other hand, the Formation distributed in the most-western part of this district is the upper horizon and also younger than that of the most-eastern part of the district.
    8) It is, therefore, concluded that the Kurotaki Formation was deposited at different times with same facies, and also that the Katsuura and the Kurotaki Formations were deposited at the same time with different facies. It is remarkable that the Kurotaki Formation in the Kurogahana area lies under the Katsuura Formation as its basement.
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  • Shoji TONOUCHI, Toshio FURUTA, Kazuo KOBAYASHI
    1981 Volume 90 Issue 1 Pages 14-24
    Published: February 25, 1981
    Released: October 13, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Magnetic properties of the pillow basalts, dike basalts and ultramafic rocks of the ophiolite suite of the Boso-Miura Peninsula (Cenozoic) are compared with those of the ophiolite suite in the Maizuru district (Paleozoic). From the dike basalt of Boso Peninsula to the least altered dike basalts of Miura Peninsula and Maizuru district, the average intensity of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) decreases from a maximum of 1.5×10-3 to 8×10-4 (emu/cc).
    The Köenigsberger ratios (Qn) of these dike basalts range from 3.2 to 0.4. Thermomagnetic analyses for the dike basalts from the Cenozoic ophiolite suite exhibit the characteristic behavior of low temperature-oxidized cation deficient titanomagnetite or titanomaghemite.
    In contrast the dike basalt of the Paleozoic ophiolite suite does not have a clear irreversible thermomagnetic curve. The pillow basalts of the Cenozoic ophiolite have NRM intensities from 3×10-3 to 6×10-4 (emu/cc) and Qn-values from 8 to 5. Thermomagnetic analyses of the Cenozoic pillow basalts are quite similar to those of the Cenozoic dike basalts. In the Paleozoic ophiolite suite of the Maizuru district, pillow stractures are not developed in the basalt, but auto-brecciated pillow basalt are present. These auto-brecciated pillow basalts have NRM intensities of abont 1×10-4 (emu/cc) and Qn-values of about 0.3.
    The ultramafic rocks of the two ophiolite suites show wide range of NRM intensities from 1×10-3 to 1×10-4 (emu/cc). Thermomagnetic analyses of the ultramafic rocks have reversible thermomagnetic curves for pure magnetite.
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  • Shigeo SUGIHARA, Hideji YOKOYAMA
    1981 Volume 90 Issue 1 Pages 25-37
    Published: February 25, 1981
    Released: October 13, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Teiichi KOBAYASHI
    1981 Volume 90 Issue 1 Pages 38-45
    Published: February 25, 1981
    Released: October 13, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1981 Volume 90 Issue 1 Pages 46-47
    Published: February 25, 1981
    Released: October 13, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    1981 Volume 90 Issue 1 Pages 47-48
    Published: February 25, 1981
    Released: October 13, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • M. SHIKI
    1981 Volume 90 Issue 1 Pages plate1-plate2
    Published: February 25, 1981
    Released: October 13, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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