Journal of Geography (Chigaku Zasshi)
Online ISSN : 1884-0884
Print ISSN : 0022-135X
ISSN-L : 0022-135X
Volume 61 , Issue 4
Showing 1-12 articles out of 12 articles from the selected issue
  • Yukio KAWABATA
    1953 Volume 61 Issue 4 Pages 121-125
    Published: January 30, 1953
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In this paper the author summarized the researches done in Japan on the relation between sunspots and meteorological phenomena.
    The idea common to almost all the researchers is that the sunspots as an index of solar activity cause the variations of atmospheric pressure on the earth namely, as the conditions of the earth's atmosphere which receives solar radiation are varying according to seasons and locations, the changes in solar radiation due to sunspots cause the variations of the distribution of atmospheric pressure, which result in disturbances of air currents and in climatic variations. And these disturbances are almost strongly effected, in Japan, by the changes in the intensity of the North Pacific High and by the migration of its center.
    A few Japanese researchers are making use of the faculae instead of sunspots in their researches, and they consider the degree of the faculae's facing to the earch as the solar activity index, and this consideration seems to be an excellent one perhaps unseen in other countries.
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  • Eiichirô FUKUI
    1953 Volume 61 Issue 4 Pages 126-129
    Published: January 30, 1953
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Japan is a land of disasters, frequently visited by disastrous accidents primarily caused by climatic or meteorological phenomena. In the present paper the writer describes various climatic phenomena that are closely related with natural disasters In Japan.
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  • Kikukazu DOI
    1953 Volume 61 Issue 4 Pages 130-138
    Published: January 30, 1953
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    To help the comparative study of American and Japanese urban settlements, the author describes some peculiarities of the former. Firstly, most of the incorporated places with more than 2, 500 inhabitants have the status of city in the U. S., while population over 30, 000 is required for the Japanese urban settlements to gain the same status. This is partly due to the higher economic power of the American cities and low population density of their trade areas, but the exclusion of suburbs and farms from the incorporated area is another important reason. On the other hand many Japanese cities includes spacious farm areas and large agricultural population.
    Urban settlements are classified by the author as follows and their functions described : I. Urban centers of the first order (Villages-pop. 250-4, 000 Towns 1, 0006, 000) II. Urban centers of the second order (Cities 10, 000-.400, 000 Industrial or heavily industrialized commercial cities 100, 000300, 000) III. Metropolitan centers (over 300, 000)
    Secondly, incorporated areas of the most of the American cities are very limited and do not agree with the unit areas of economic and social activities, which is not the case of the Japanese cities where the annexation presents little difficulty. Some samples of complicated administrative units in the metropolitan districts and plans for corordination or consolidation are shown.
    This paper is based on the author's study at the University of Wisconsin during the 195051 academic year but owes much to the works of Professors G. T. Trewartha, J. H. Kolb and R. E. Dickinson, to whom his deep thankfulness is hereby expressed.
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  • Shingo EHARA
    1953 Volume 61 Issue 4 Pages 139-146
    Published: January 30, 1953
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The Nankai Trench
    On the bathymetric chart of the offing of Shikoku, one may distinguish the Nankai Trench running from WWS. to EEN., which lies between the continental slope and the oceanic basin. The trench is enclosed in the 4, 600m. isobath, whose width is 60km. to W, but it tends a little narrower eastward. The bottom is rather flat and shallow, containing subellipsoidal or suborbicular deeps enclosed in the 5, 000m. isobath, which stand in a line parallel to the trench.
    To the south of Ise Bay the trench, however, turns to NE, and maintaining the direction, reaches the south of Suruga Bay, and, while approaching the Bay, it becomes narrower in width, but particularly increasing the inclination of the bottom. At the terminal, where the 3, 600m. isobath passes, the trench becomes 10km, in width, and the bottom is lifted to 1, 000m. higher than in the south of Shikoku.
    Concerning the tectonic character of the Nankai Trench, it should be necesary to denote the 3 phases of the tectonic movement of the Fossa Magna : 1) The pushing of the Shichito batholith into the outerzone (Akigawa series) of Middle Honshu at the neck of the Izu Peninsula, by the lateral thrust of the Shichito Trench, and the consequent occurrence of the great curving of the Median Line, which is manifested by the Toyohashi-Suwa-B5s5 arc. 2) The making of the Itoigawa-Nirazaki-Hakone line, along which the occurrence of the 60 km. shifting of the eastern wing of the arc by the continual thrust of the Shichito Trench. 3) On the western wall of the Fossa Magna, the building up of the Echelon of Akaishi, Kiso and Hida Mt. ranges which are subjected to the shearing pressure of the 60 km. shifting of the eastern wing.
    The time of the tectonic movement is assigned to the beginning of the Miocene. The orogenesis seems, hewever, to have twice *occurred in history, the first, in the beginning of the Miocene, and the 2nd in the early Pleistocene. The latter movement is considered to be the repetition of the movement of the Miocene ; that is, 'the pushing of the Shichito batholith into the Misaka series containing Lepidocyclinl, which formed an arc of the Misaka-Miura-Boso, while the eastern wing of the Fossa Magna is subjected to the lateral thrust from the Shichito Trench, which is manifested by the geologic structure of the Neogene series deposited in the Fossa Magna and the Boso Peninsula.
    The Nankai Trench takes part in the tectonic movement of the Fossa Magna : the trend of the trench is parallel to the Median Line and accords with the Echelon of Akaishi, Kiso and Hida Mt. ranges; the narrowing of the terminal and the upraising of the bottom due to the movement of the eastern wing of the Fossa Magna, which moved to NW. along the Itoigawa-Nirazaki-Hakone line.
    According to the chart, the Nankai Trench appears to take the course to SE. to the south of the Straits of Bungo and to run along the Kyushu-Palau geanticline of Dr, Hess, though it ought ordinarily to stretch SW. and connect with the Ryukyu Trench.
    The oceanic basin which delimits the southern side of the Nankai Trench appears to be the true ocean floor corresponding to that of the Pacific, It extends to SE. to unite itself to the Pacific there is, however, in the way Sulpher volcanic I. which erupted at the beginning of the Recent time. 40 years ago, the oceanic basin is properly termed “South Japan Sea” by Dr. B. Koto.
    The thrust under the Nippon Trench from the Pacific bottom may act upon the floor of the South Japan Sea through the Shichito submarine ridge, and may be dynamic source pressing on the Nankai Trench and southern Shikoku.
    The Block Movement of Shikoku
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  • Kumizi IIDA
    1953 Volume 61 Issue 4 Pages 147-151
    Published: January 30, 1953
    Released: February 25, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The recent developments in geophysical exploration all through the world are shortly reviewed.
    The subjects in this paper are the following : 1. Introduction. 2. Geophysical exploration in coal fields, 3. Geophysical exploration in oil and gas fields. 4. Geophysical exploration in mining. 5. Engineering geophysical exploration such as underground water, dam-sites, etc.
    Petroleum exploration geophysics in the United States of America have been sweepingly developed, while coal exploration geophysics as well as mining and engineering geophysics in Japan have comparatively advanced.
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  • Teishiro AKIYAMA, Yoshimasa YAMAMOTO
    1953 Volume 61 Issue 4 Pages 152-153
    Published: January 30, 1953
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    By the boring records of hot springs which were bored in the past, the depth of the base rock and the underground structure of Kofu District have been found, and the presumptive east-west and north-south geological cross sections of Kofu City down to I Km under the ground are drawn. Next, distribution chart of temperature and pH of hot springs are shown, thus there are clarified the relation between the geological structure and the temperature and pH of hot springs.
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  • [in Japanese]
    1953 Volume 61 Issue 4 Pages 154-156
    Published: January 30, 1953
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1953 Volume 61 Issue 4 Pages 157-163
    Published: January 30, 1953
    Released: February 25, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    1953 Volume 61 Issue 4 Pages 164-165
    Published: January 30, 1953
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1953 Volume 61 Issue 4 Pages 165
    Published: January 30, 1953
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1953 Volume 61 Issue 4 Pages 166
    Published: January 30, 1953
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1953 Volume 61 Issue 4 Pages 166a
    Published: January 30, 1953
    Released: November 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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