Journal of Geography (Chigaku Zasshi)
Online ISSN : 1884-0884
Print ISSN : 0022-135X
ISSN-L : 0022-135X
Volume 93 , Issue 3
Showing 1-8 articles out of 8 articles from the selected issue
  • Shigeru KATO
    1984 Volume 93 Issue 3 Pages 119-132
    Published: June 25, 1984
    Released: October 13, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Multi-channel seismic reflection survey was carried out in Tokyo Bay along 6 lines of 130km in total length by the Hydrographic Department in March 1982. For this surveytwo air guns of 500 cubic inches were used as sonic source and a 24 channel streamer cableof 1200m length were used as a receiver. Acquired data were processed by the methods of CDP stacking, time migration, depth conversion and others. Then 12-fold stack section, migrated time section and migrated depth section for each line were made after these processing. We can clearly find the geological structure beneath Tokyo Bay to about 3 kmdepth on these sections.
    The geological structure beneath Tokyo Bay is summerized as follows:
    1) Pre-Neogene basement rocks in the Kanto area are found at 2-3km depth in thecenter of the Bay, and more than 3.4km depth in the southern part of the Bay.
    2) A fault with strike of N50-55°W is found at the northern part of the Bay, whichdisplaced the Pre-Neogene basement down to 420m on the north.
    3) Neogene and Quaternary layers of 2-3km thick cover the Pre-Neogene basement. From the lower layer to the upper one, the part of maximum thickness moves from southto northeast in the Bay.
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  • Yasuo MIYAKAWA
    1984 Volume 93 Issue 3 Pages 133-155
    Published: June 25, 1984
    Released: October 13, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In the number of production of automobiles, Japan topped all the rest in 1980, followed by the United States, West Germany, France, the U. S. S. R., the United Kingdom andItaly. The remarkable development of the Japanese automobile industry in the world ledby the three notable companies, Toyota, Nissan and Honda receive peculiar attention asthey decided to establish their overseas productive companies in the United States and Europe. There is a cooperative company established by Toyota and G. M. in 1984 at the siteof Fremont factory of G. M. in California, the United States. It can be said this is a symbolof the new stage of international collaboration for survival of automobile companies.
    Japan has been producing almost all sorts of automobiles in the own country with carefulconsideration to the advantage of the economy of scale since the foundation of automobileindustry, while leading companies in the United States, G. M., Ford and Chryslerintended to get about a half of their production not in the United States but in foreigncountries to preserve their international market. With the economy of scale and the excellentcontrol of its quality, in such a keen competition of the international market, Japanhas gradually begun to get a strong power for exports. In 1981, Japan exported 54% ofits production all over the country, especially the amount of 44.6% came to the United States in the total exports as against 6.0% of West Germany and 5.1% of Canada. As forthe imports, Japan must find itself in a difficult situation, shown the numbers of importsfrom West Germany and the United States. In fact, as contrasted, we recognize that theUnited States is the most important importer in the international market, which exportedonly 8.8% of its total production in 1981. So far as West Germany concerned, we shouldthink much of its character that is the secondary influential importer and also exporter inthe international market.
    With ragrad to the number of exports, G. M. and Ford in Canada and Opel (G. M.) and Ford in West Germany have exported more automobiles than those of G. M. and Fordin the United States respectively. Japan has not yet such sort of multinational company. At present, Toyota and Nissan tried to develop their overseas productive companies in other advanced countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom, where Honda hadalready their productive abilities.
    In this paper, the author demonstrates the factors for internationalization of the Japaneseautomobile industry and for evolution of the international system through the five stages of its developments, paying due regards to the policies of multinational companies and ofeach national government.
    In the first stage (-1954), the internationalization of the Japanese automobile industrywas promoted by the Army and the Ministry of Commerce and Industry, when Manchuriawas constructed in China; in 1932, the seven leading companies in Japan led by Nissancame to Mukuden and established an automobile company there to get support of the Manchuriangovern ment and the South Manchurian Railway company. In a short time we knowthey ended in failure; the Japanese government put the higher import-tariff on automobilesto result in the closure of two multinational companies, G. M. and Ford in Japan in 1939.
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  • Junji NISHINA
    1984 Volume 93 Issue 3 Pages 156-167
    Published: June 25, 1984
    Released: October 13, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In his preceding paper (NiSHINA 1984), the author discussed an orographic effect onthe cloud distribution in the Central Japan under the winter monsoon situation. Such anorographic effect is considered to exist also in the Southwest Japan in winter. The purposeof this study is to examine the relation between the location of the band clouds onthe Pacific Ocean side in the Southwest Japan and the distribution of surface meteorologicalelements, and to discuss an orographic effect on the distribution of these band clouds in thisregion.
    In this study, the author used GMS sector visible pictures at 00 GMT on the all daysin three winters (December, January and February) from December in 1978 to Februaryin 1981. Of these all pictures, the pictures of the 42 days on which appeared at least fourlines of band clouds of six as shown in Fig. 2 were analyzed. In my preceding paper, theresult was obtained that the generation of local anticyclones and cyclones differs under dif-ferent wind direction at 800-850mb altitude. According to this result, the 42 days wereclassified into four types (W, WNW, NW, NNW) by the wind direction at 850mb altitudein Shionom isaki. Meteorological elements at 850mb altitude and at the surface were analyzedin each type.
    The results are summarized as follows:
    1. The band clouds in the leeward of the Kii Mts., the Shikoku Mts., or the Kyushu Mts. all appear from the low pressure region in the leeward of these mountains. But theappearance rate of these band clouds differs under different upper (850mb level) wind direc-tion, which can be explained by the relation between the upper wind direction and the direction of these mountains.
    2. The band cloud from the Kii Strait appears along the line of discontinuity of windextending from the low pressure region in the leeward of the Chugoku Mts. when northnorth westerlyupper wind blows. Under westerly wind, it does on the outburst of the windfrom the Kanmon Strait through the Seto Inland Sea. But in the latter case, no bandcloud appears when high pressure region expands strongly from the Shikoku Mts. to theKii Mts.
    3. The outburst of the wind from the Kanmon Strait plays basically an importantrole in the appearance of the band cloud from the Bungo Strait. Under westerly upperwind, a line of discontinuity of wind is made of this outburst and the wind from the anticyclone generating near Kumamoto in the windward of the Kyushu Mts. A band cloudappears along this line. Under north-northwesterly upper wind, the cold air current from the anticyclone generating near Hita in the wind ward of the Kyushu Mts. is brought to thewest of this outburst, where a band cloud appears.
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  • Committee of History of Japanese Earth Sciences
    1984 Volume 93 Issue 3 Pages 168-181
    Published: June 25, 1984
    Released: October 13, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Masatoshi NAGAOKA
    1984 Volume 93 Issue 3 Pages 182-183
    Published: June 25, 1984
    Released: October 13, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1984 Volume 93 Issue 3 Pages 184-186
    Published: June 25, 1984
    Released: October 13, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    1984 Volume 93 Issue 3 Pages 186-187
    Published: June 25, 1984
    Released: December 22, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • S. IWATA
    1984 Volume 93 Issue 3 Pages plate1-plate2
    Published: June 25, 1984
    Released: October 13, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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