Japanese Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine
Online ISSN : 1881-4751
Print ISSN : 0039-906X
ISSN-L : 0039-906X
Volume 52 , Issue 5
Showing 1-20 articles out of 20 articles from the selected issue
  • 2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 475-489
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • TAKASHI YASOJIMA, TOMOHIRO KIZUKA, HIROSHI NOGUCHI, HITOSHI SHIRAKI, N ...
    2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 491-498
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study is to identify the effect of position (full can, empty can) and change of angle on the activity of shoulder muscles during scapular plane abduction ; and also to examine its application to exercises used for rehabilitation of shoulder muscles. Seven healthy subjects (23.4±1.4 yr) with normal shoulder function performed scapular plane abduction with external rotation (full can) and scapular plane abduction with internal rotation (empty can) . An electromyogram was recorded with a fine wire intramuscular electrode at the supraspinatus, deltoid anterior, middle, posterior and trapezius upper with bipolar surface. The EMG activity (RMS) of each muscle was normalized by the highest EMG activity (100%RMS) during a maximum manual muscle test for each muscle (%RMS) . The %RMS of each muscle remarkably increased with a change of the angle for empty can, whereas it showed a slight increase with a change of the angle for full can. This finding suggests that the position of full can and empty can in scapular plane abduction affects the function of shoulder muscles. In addition, full can exercise is recommended in order to improve function of the supraspinatus and the muscular activity balance between the supraspinatus and the deltoid. Empty can exercise is applied to sport-specific exercise for rehabilitation of shoulder muscles.
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  • FUMIHIKO IWAHARA, MASAMITSU ITO, TOSHIO ASAMI
    2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 499-511
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of active recovery between two strenuous anaerobic exercises separated by a short time interval. Eight healthy adult male volunteers (age: 24.8±1.8 yrs, height: 170.6±2.5 cm, weight : 70.1 ±2.5 kg) underwent five exercise sessions. Each session consisted of a warm-up, the first anaerobic exercise test (40 sec of exhaustive cycle ergometer exercise), a 30 min inactive (seated) or active recovery period, and a second anaerobic exercise test. During the active recovery period, subjects executed one of four different intensity pedaling tests (60, 80, 100, 120% of predetermined lactate threshold intensity) for 10 min. There were no significant differences in mean power and peak blood lactate concentration among sessions during the first anaerobic exercise test. Significant differences were found in the blood lactate concentration among sessions during the second anaerobic exercise test, and significant differences were found in mean power for the second anaerobic exercise. Optimal intensity related to the blood lactate removal rate was 83.3±7.1%LT, and that related to the working capacity recovery rate was 68.3±11.8%LT.
    From these results, concerning blood lactate removal rate, it was suggested that between 80%LT and 100%LT was an effective intensity. As for performance, the effective intensity was less than 100%LT.
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  • TOMOKO YAMAUCHI, TADAKI YAMADA, MOHAMMOD MONIRUL ISLAM, AKIYOSHI OKADA ...
    2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 513-523
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of well-rounded exercise program (WREP) on cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength, flexibility, body composition, and serum lipid concentration in a group of older outpatients. WREP was composed of programmed aerobic/ anaerobic accommodating circuit exercise (PACE) and flexibility exercises. Twenty-two volunteers (69.6±3.2 yr) were used as subjects. All participants engaged in a supervised exercise program (50 min/day and 3 days/week) for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of training, there was a significant increase in VO2 corresponding to lactate threshold (13.4%) but peak V02 did not change. There were significant increases for knee extension (17.1%) and flexion (12.3%), chest pull (10.9%), low back flexion (26.6%), and shoulder press (14.6%) after training. Side stepping agility (13%), trunk flexion (129%) and trunk extension (19%) were also significantly improved. There were significant decreases in percent of body fat (-8.3%), total cholesterol (-7.1%) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-9.7%) . Blood pressure also decreased in SBP (-lOmmHg) and DBP (- 5 mmHg) . The decline in SBP was significant in thirteen hypertensive patients (-14 mmHg) compared to non-hypertensive patients (- 5 mmHg) . These results indicate that WREP elicits significant improvement of overall fitness in older outpatients.
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  • MASAE YONA, MASUO MURO
    2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 525-532
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The present study examined the recruitment threshold of motor units (MUs) and the cold reflex activation of the cutaneous receptors at the first turning point (TP1) and the second turning point (TP2) of decreasing skin temperature. The skin temperatures of the biceps brachii were continuously reduced using a cooling chamber fixed at -10°C. TP1 and TP2 appeared at 25.5±0.5°C and 18.5±2.21°C, respectively. The data were collected at±1°C of TP1 and TP2 (TP1-B, TP1-A, TP2-B and TP2-A) . The MUs was collected during a slow ramp contraction for 3 sec to 20% maximal voluntary contraction (20%MVC) at the each measure points (TE) . The rates of decrease in skin temperature were 1.242±0.349°C min at slope-1 (TP1-B), 0.627±0.284°C rain at slope-2 (TP1-A and TP2-B), and 0.201±0.045°C/min at slope-3 (TP2-A) . The difference of the threshold force value (ΔTF= TE-control value) of LT-MUs were positive value, on the other hand, ΔF of HT-MUs were negative value at TP1-B, TP1-A, TP2-B and TP2-A. The changes of ΔTF of LT-MUs were a little at TP1-B, TP1-A, TP2-B, and increased markedly more at TP2-A than at TP1-B (p<0.05) . On the other hand, the ΔTF of HT-MUs decreased significantly more at TP1-B than at TP1-A and TP2-B (p<0.05), however, it did not significantly differ at TP2-A. These results suggested that the threshold force of HT-MUs depend on skin temperature and LT-MUs depend on decrease speed of skin temperature.
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  • YIFA JIANG, SACHIO NAGASAKI, TOSHIO MATSUOKA, YOSHINORI FURUTA, HIDENO ...
    2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 533-541
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study was to identify the relationships between trunk sway (TS) and the motion of center of pressure (COP) during quiet upright stance. Eight young healthy subjects (averaged 24±6.7 years) including 3 females were recruited for this study. By comparing TS with COP, we found that TS is moving in phase with COP both in lateral and sagittal plane. On the basis of observations that the COP-TS error signal is very similar to the changes of friction between the feet and floor. We also found that the friction is the impetus of trunk sway obeying the Newton's law. Then, a dynamic model between TS and COP can be identified. The results showed that TS and the motion of COP are in accordance with a specific differential equation. Supporting TS is v and COPS is u, then u can be expressed as : u=-Hm/k v+hv, where H, k, h are constants, m is the body mass. The simulation results fitted the experimental findings very well. The results suggested that TS instead of COP is a promising index for human standing ability assessment.
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  • MASAYOSHI YAMAMOTO, TOSHIO YAMAZAKI
    2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 543-554
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study is to help preventing mountaineering accidents. We conducted a questionnaire survey of middle-aged and senior mountaineers (over forty) on a nationwide scale and obtained 3781 significant responses. Both male and female respondents were in their mid-fifties on average. In terms of frequency of mountaineering, the twice-a-month group was the largest one. Approximately 70 percent did physical exercise regularly. Most of the respondents answered that they did not get so tired while mountaineering. However, troubles and/or disabilities while mountaineering occurred in 70% of them. Among them, “ache in the knee”and “wobbly legs”were the most frequent. They seems to be the causes for tumble accidents during descent which is the most common accident in middle-aged mountaineers. According to the results of cross tabulation and chi square testing, 4 items including regular physical training, regular mountaineering, optimum range of BMI (between 21 and 23) and abundant mountaineering experience were the key factors for preventing fatigue and troubles while mountaineering. On the contrary, age and sex were less important factors. However, in the case of some respondents who exercised regularly, they felt fatigue or had troubles while mountaineering. Additionally, some respondents who were confident in their physical fitness did not seem to have enough physical fitness to prevent fatigue and troubles. As stated above, inconsistent relationships were often observed among daily physical training, fatigue and troubles while mountaineering, and confidence in physical fitness, which will be one of the cause of mountaineering accidents.
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  • MASASHI MITAMURA, TAKASHI ENDOH, REI TAKAHASHI, TOMOYOSHI KOMIYAMA
    2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 555-563
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Eleven healthy subjects repetitively performed maximal cycling movement for 10 s with 20 s rest intervals. The load of the cycling was respectively set to 30% (high frequency task, lIF' task) and 80% (high power task, TIP task) of the optimal load for exerting maximum anaerobic power. Each task was finished when the exerted maximal power was decreased to 80% of the initial value. While performing each task, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was delivered to the motor cortex which was effectively able to evoke motor evoked potential (MEP) from the thigh muscles. Elec-tromyographic (EMG) activity of the left rectos femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL) and the MEP was analyzed.
    The maximal power exerted was decreased to 80.6±1.58 % in the HF task, and 77.3±0.77 % in the HP task. The number of repeated sets in each task was 10.1 ± 1.45 (HF task) and 4.1±0.25 sets (HP task) . The MEP area of the RF and VL was not changed significantly in the HF task, though it was significantly increased in the latter half of the HP task. A two-way ANOVA showed that the time course of the changes in the MEP area was significant in the VL (p<0.01), but not in the RF. In both tasks, the duration of the MEP was progressively prolonged in each 10 sec pedaling, and the prolongation was evident in the latter half of the tasks. However, the magnitude of the prolongation was significantly larger during the HP task. The ratio of the integrated amplitude of the EMG and the exerted power at the initial 5 bouts of cycling (EMG/Power ratio) was significantly increased in both the RF and VL, suggesting that peripheral muscular fatigue was induced during at the latter half of each task. Furthermore, the EMG/Power ratio in the VL was significantly higher during the HP task than the HF task.
    These results suggest that central fatigue plays a significant role in decreasing the maximum power output, and that it takes place in a muscle-dependent fashion. It was also suggested that during low load, but relatively higher cadence frequency, central fatigue other than that involving the motor cortex accounts for the decreased power output.
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  • TAKASHI ENDOH, MASASHI MITAMURA, REI TAKAHASHI, TOMOYOSHI KOMIYAMA
    2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 565-574
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Changes in the motor evoked potential (MEP) evoked by transcranial magnetic motor cortex stimulation (TMS) of rectos femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) was examined during constant cadence cycling tasks for 60 sec. Subjects were 11 normal male volunteers aged between 19 and 25 years. Pedaling load was set at 100% and 80% of the estimated optimal value for maximum anaerobic power output. For the low load task (LL task), the pedaling rate was set at half the value of the maximum pedaling rate with the load set at 80% of the optimal for maximum anaerobic power output. For the high load task (HL task), the pedaling rate was set such that the power was equivalent to the LL task.
    The route mean square of the electromyographic (EMG) activity amplitude tended to steeply increase during the latter half of the task. The magnitude of the increase in the RMS was significantly larger in the HL task than the LL task. The area of the MEP also tended to increase in both tasks, though the degree of the increase was significantly larger in the LL task than the HL task. The EMG silent period (SP) after the MEP tended to steeply increase just after the task initiation and to decrease in the latter half of the task in the HL task. However, in the LL task the facilitation of MEP was not found, but it showed a gradual decrease while performing the task. The duration of the MEP tended to increase in both tasks, though the degree of the increase in the VL was significantly larger in the LL task than the HL task. The linear regression analysis between the size of the MEP and the background EMG shows a significant positive correlation coefficient during isometric contraction, but not during the two types of cycling tasks.
    These results suggest that the neural circuit responsible for the MEP was controlled differentially during isometric contraction and constant cadence pedaling. Also it is likely that the mechanism of central fatigue differed depending on the cadence and or load in a task-dependent fashion irrespective of the same power output.
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  • KAZUO TSUYUKI, YASUO KIMURA, TOMOMI KAMEYAMA, KENJI NINOMIYA, SHINICHI ...
    2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 575-584
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A study was conducted to clarify the validity and availability of inclination of exponential curve-fitting model for oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate (HR) during incremental exercise (IECOH) as an index of cardio-pulmonary functional reserve in healthy subjects. A treadmill exercise test was used to measure the VO2 (L/kg/min) and HR (beat /min) during incremental exercise of all subjects. The IECOH was derived from the following equation : HR=A⋅expB·VO2. The constant “B” represents the IECOH. The following three identifications were made : 1) the relationship between maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and IECOH in 82 healthy males ; 2) the relationship between IECOH and age in 428 healthy males and females ; 3) the effect of physical training in 8 healthy males.
    There was inverse correlation between IECOH and VO2max (r= -0.824) . And also, there were inverse correlations between IECOH detected from submaximal tests and VO2max (above r=-0.6) . There were no differences in the IECOH detected from maximal and submaximal tests. In Bland-Altman plot method, accuracy of measurment in the IECOH detected from submaximal exercise test was precise. There was a significant relationship between IECOH and age in male and female subjects (r=0.499 and r=0.310, respectively) . Physical training increased VO2max and decreased IECOH significantly. The VO2max before and after physical training correlated inversely with the IECOH before and after physical training (r=-0.514) .
    In conclusion, these results suggest that IECOH is adequate and useful as an index of cardio-pulmonary functional reserve which can be measured by the submaximal exercise test in healthy subjects.
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  • MASATO SUZUKI, IKUO ISHIYAMA, MASATOSHI SHIOTA, KATSUHIKO MACHIDA
    2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 585-598
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The existing adoptive criterion for VO2max was created for physically fit subjects who were soldiers and/or sportsmen. However, VO2max is widely used at present as one of the health-related physical fitness determinants from children to aged persons. It might be appropriate to determine the criterion and the critical values for VO2max in consideration of age and gender.
    The present study attempted to determine the reference range and critical values of the criterion for VO2max using the iterative truncation method. Voluntary VO2max was measured in 548 healthy volunteers, aged 8 to 82 years, using a treadmill. The % VO2max was calculated using the equation of %VO2max=measured VO2max × 100 gage-estimated VO2max. Crude data of %VO2max was applied to the iterative truncation method, and the reference range of %VO2max (70-130%VO2max) was determined. Physiological and biochemical parameters, within the values of 70-130%VO2max, were converted to a percentage using a similar equation of %VO2max. The value corresponding to 10% of the lower area of the distribution of each parameter was defined as the critical value, which was the minimum level to adopt as the VO2max. Taking a single or combined application of the critical value of each parameter, the adoptive ratio of VO2max was investigated.
    The present study indicated that there was no difference between VO2max selected by the iterative truncation method and that obtained by the existing criterion for VO2max. The combination of the critical value of HRmax and bLAmax was recommended as a criterion of VO2max. The reference value, critical value of VO2max and the critical real value of each parameter were shown as a mean of every 5-year interval with the distinction of gender.
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  • KEN'ICHI EGAWA, YUKIO OIDA, YOSHINORI KITABATAKE, HIDETOSHI MAIE, SATO ...
    2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 599-608
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study hypothesized that gravity induced somatosensory input inhibits the spinal monosynaptic reflex circuit assessed by Hoffmann (H) reflex in man. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of graded head-out water immersion (HOWI) on soleus H-reflex during upright standing. Eleven healthy male subjects aged from 21 to 28 (mean=23.8) without sensorymotor or orthopaedic history signed an informed consent. Subjects maintained an upright standing position without visual input and any background activities in soleus and tibialis anterior. H-reflex was elicited by constant current stimulation at popliteal fossa. The recruitment curve for H-reflex and motor (M) response was measured under the static tilt condition (from supine to standing) and the graded HOWI condition (the control condition, the navel condition, the neck condition, and post immersion condition) in that order. Under the HOWI condition, the water (34 degrees Celsius) was filled in a minute. No change in H- and M-wave form was observed. The amplitude of test reflex at 1.05 times motor threshold significantly decreased in the standing condition compared with the supine condition (P<0.01) . Furthermore, significant change was observed in the HOWI condition (P<0.01) . A contrast test reveled a significant increase in the navel condition (P=0.03) and the neck condition (P<0.01) compared with the control condition. The results showed that graded HOWI enhances soleus H-reflex during upright standing. It was suggested that gravity-induced somatosensory input from mechanoreceptors in the soles and joints inhibits the spinal H-reflex circuit and plays an important role for the static postural control mechanism in man.
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  • SHIN YOSHIHARA, YASUTAKA KOBAYASHI, TOSHITADA YOSHIOKA, TATSUO AKEMA
    2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 609-619
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The circadian rhythm of heart rate is well known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of the relation between heart rate and oxygen uptake during a graded exercise testing with and without previous exercise. Eight healthy male students, aged 18 to 21 years, performed the graded sub-maximal exercise two times using a treadmill, after walking on a treadmill at a speed of 60 m/min for a total of 4 hours (2 hours in the morning, 2 hours in the afternoon) and without previous prolonged walking. The apparent resting heart rate after one hour of walking in the afternoon (82.3±9.1 beats mm) was higher than in the morning (71.3±5.8 beats/min), and this phenomenon was observed continuously exercise heart rate at the end of 2 hours of walking (afternoon : 96.4±5.4, morning: 87.2±7.3 beats min) . On the other hand, the oxygen uptake during exercise did not alter at the end of walking (afternoon: 622±85, morning: 600±133 ml/min) . This walking intensity ranged from 17.1 to 26.6, with a mean of 20.5 percent of maximal oxygen uptake. The pre-exercise resting heart rate before the exercise testing altered from -4.8 to 13.1 beats/min with and without the presence of walking. The observed individual regression line between heart rate and oxygen uptake from the testing shifted along with the altered resting heart rate. Therefore, the calculated individual new regression lines with and without walking between net heart rate, excluding pre-exercise rest, and oxygen uptake were approximate to a constant line. It was concluded that the exercise energy expenditure could be calculated accurately (-2 to 7 % of errors) using net heart rate, as compared with overestimations of the actual energy cost using the higher resting heart rate.
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  • HIKARU TANAKA, TAKAFUMI FUCHIMOTO, MISAKA KIMURA, MASAHIRO KANEKO
    2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 621-630
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In the context of energetics related to a pendular model, the mechanical power (W) and ‘pendular motion efficiency’ (PME) were determined during walking of the subjects who consist of 37 healthy elderly women (65-85 years) and 21 young women (18-25 years) . Using a force plate, the potential and kinetic energies of the body's centre of mass were measured at various constant speeds. Walking speeds were selected and controlled by a newly devised pace-maker. PME, which is equivalent to ‘% recovery’ by Cavagna (1976), indicates a sort of efficiency in transforming potential energy into kinetic energy and vice versa. The external power to accelerate the body (Wext ), which is thought to be supplied by muscles, increased with walking speed, and the rate of increase in Wext tended to be greater in the elderly than in the young subjects. It was noted that the maximal PME values at the optimum speed in both age groups were comparable, but PME values in the elderly decreased more markedly than in the young subjects as walking speed deviated from the optimum. This fact suggests that an adaptability to different walking speeds reduced in the elderly population.
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  • MIEKO NAKANISHI, KOJIRO ISHII, AYAKO WATANABE, KATUMI SUGIURA, YOKO KA ...
    2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 631-638
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Recently, supplements for athletes are being increasingly used. To clarify the current status of supplement intake, we conducted a survey in female university long-distance runners.
    An anonymous questionnaire survey was conducted in runners who participated in the 18th Japan Inter-University Women's EKIDEN Championship, We investigated 99 respondents.
    The survey showed that 86 runners (87%) took supplements. Iron was most frequently taken (68 runners, 69%) . The common purpose was to reduce fatigue (amino acids, vitamin C) and prevent ane mia (iron) . However, some supplements were taken after their effects were realized, while others were taken without an effect. In some cases, the purpose was not consistent with the effects. Most runners (73%) purchased supplements in shops stores. Fifty percent of them took supplements for supplementation of nutrients deficient in diets. More than 50% of the runners obtained information on nutrition from their coaches.
    Furthermore, most runners began to take supplements when they were senior (55 runners, 56%) or junior (31 runners, 31%) high school students. About 70% of them have taken iron. In the highest percentage of them, their coaches recommended the use of supplements.
    The results of this survey showed that most female university long-distance runners took supplements, and that a high proportion of them began to take them when they were senior or junior high school students, suggesting the widespread use of supplements among young athletes. In addition, their instructors markedly influenced the runner's nutritional outlook, by being the source of information on nutrition.
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  • JURI YOKOUCHI, DAISUKE ANDO, YUSUKE ONO, YOSHIMASA OZAKI, KAZUMI ASAKA ...
    2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 639-646
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of anthropometric measures, including body height, body weight, body mass index (BMI), fat mass (FM), and lean body mass (LBM), on quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters of calcaneus in 358 Japanese university women. Ultrasonic bone densitometer (Achilles, Lunar corp.) was utilized to measure broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), speed of sound (SOS), and stiffness index (SI) of the right calcaneus. The average of SI in this study showed a slight lower value (84, 3±12.1, mean±SD) compared with that in age-matched university women as previously reported. The contradictive finding may suggest the need for a large-scale further investigation on SI in young women. Correlation analysis revealed that both BUA and SI are significantly correlated with all anthropometric measures. However SOS had only weak correlation with LBM. In consideration of the high colinearities of body weight and BMI with FM and LBM, the multiple liner regression analysis was conducted with BUA, SOS, and SI as dependent variables. Body height, FM, and LBM were then entered to a forward stepwise regression model. The analysis proved that the significant predictor of BUA, SOS, and SI is LBM. It also suggested BUA to be stronger correlated with LBM than the other QUS parameters, SOS and SI. In conclusion, our re sults support the view that QUS parameters appear to be influenced by anthropometric measures, especially by LBM in Japanese university women. It is conceivable that an increase in skeletal mus cle mass chiefly induced by physical exercise contributes to the improvement of bone mass as measured by QUS in young women.
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  • 2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 647-659
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
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  • 2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 660-670
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • 2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 671-677
    Published: October 01, 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
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  • 2003 Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages e1
    Published: 2003
    Released: September 30, 2010
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