Journal of Japan Society of Nursing Research
Online ISSN : 2189-6100
Print ISSN : 2188-3599
ISSN-L : 2188-3599
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Showing 1-7 articles out of 7 articles from the selected issue
  • Kaori Abe, Mariko Shikamura, Mayumi Mizuta
    2020 Volume 43 Issue 4 Pages 4_693-4_704
    Published: September 20, 2020
    Released: September 20, 2020
    [Advance publication] Released: July 03, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Objective: To ascertain how competent nurses view nursing expertise as part of team care.
    Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 nurses with 3-4 years of clinical experience, and their responses were analyzed using a qualitative descriptive methodology.
    Results: The ways in which competent nurses viewed nursing expertise as part of team care were classified into 6 categories: Ascertaining the needs of the patient and his or her family through close interaction, Identifying what is best for the patient and providing care in line with the patient’s lifestyle, The ability to perform a multi-faceted assessment that identifies even subtle changes, Sharing information that allows the team to better assist the patient, Encouraging the development of interpersonal relationships among team members, and Drawing upon the valued expertise of other professionals. Based on subcategories, competent nurses sensed The challenge of reporting to other professionals, Difficulty speaking out during conferences, and A lack of understanding of one’s expertise on behalf of other professionals.
    Conclusion: Results suggested that postgraduate training programs for competent nurses need to be developed and that nurses need to be trained in the ability to address issues that may arise when collaborating with other professionals.

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  • Kayo Ohashi, Michiko Inagaki, Keiko Tasaki, Tomomi Horiguchi
    2020 Volume 43 Issue 4 Pages 4_705-4_713
    Published: September 20, 2020
    Released: September 20, 2020
    [Advance publication] Released: July 03, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The purpose of this study was to qualitatively describe the difficulties that cancer patients experience during recurrence and the resulting exacerbation of their condition when discussing their thoughts and feelings with their family. We conducted unstructured interviews with 11 cancer patients and analyzed the data utilizing the phenomenological approach based on Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology of perception.
    We extracted five themes based on the analysis: I do not need to express my feelings to my family because we have already experienced many difficult times together; I realize I must work through my cancer myself; I am anxious about my family’s real thoughts about me; I feel the pressure caused by the significant burden that my cancer has placed on my family; and I continue to feel the ominous threat of death hanging over me regardless of the feelings and thoughts I share with my family. While patients consider their families to be precious, and they continue to find meaning and strength from their presence, they also perceive themselves as threats to their families because they are dying. The uncertain situation forced upon them by their illness foments great pain and prevents them from expressing their true feelings to their families.

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  • Kumiko Morita, Makiko Kondo
    2020 Volume 43 Issue 4 Pages 4_715-4_731
    Published: September 20, 2020
    Released: September 20, 2020
    [Advance publication] Released: July 24, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Purpose: When the second patient is diagnosed with breast cancer, there is a high possibility that the disease is familial, and her ability to cope with the disease is essential for the family to adapt to the presence of familial breast cancer. This study aimed to understand the coping process of the second patient within blood relatives who has been diagnosed with familial breast cancer to identify effective nursing strategies.
    Method: Data were gathered using semi-structured interviews based on an interview guide and analyzed using qualitative and inductive research methods.
    Result: Sixteen patients were enrolled (age range: 40-72 years). Core categories were Caution without enforcement (before onset), Intuition with high sensitivity (at first breast cancer signs), Proband as a good bellwether, Advocating for blood relatives, and Advocating beyond the family without obsessing with heredity (all after diagnosis).
    Discussion: Nursing strategies to enhance adaptation to familial breast cancer in a consanguineous family are 1) to reduce the anxiety of non-patients and to minimize the negative impacts on life decisions while still preparing against crises (breast cancer) and 2) to accumulate the coping strategies of the bellwethers among the consanguineous family.

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  • Polyphony as “Equivalency of time”
    Mami Yamamoto, Midori Asano, Naoki Nomura
    2020 Volume 43 Issue 4 Pages 4_733-4_744
    Published: September 20, 2020
    Released: September 20, 2020
    [Advance publication] Released: July 10, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The present study, involving a mother who is attending a school for children with special needs, examined the process in which she learns methods for understanding the growth of her child, and suggested concepts that are necessary to recognize the growth of a child as narratives. The mother described the growth of her child in terms of several different language of time. (1) Some narratives were spoken individually and the different sequences of time did not interact with each other, and (2) the different sequences of time conflicted with each other. (3) The different time sequences interacted with each other. After describing the development of her child in terms of different sequences of time, she learned that “any sequence of time is equally worth being selected,” which was called the “equivalency of time”. The “equivalency of time” is a concept used to understand the child development as narratives. Understanding the growth of children based on “equivalency of time” helps parents learn that their narratives improve their recognition of the growth of their children, and that views regarding their growth are developed through interactions.

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  • Misa Suzuki, Yuko Tomari
    2020 Volume 43 Issue 4 Pages 4_745-4_756
    Published: September 20, 2020
    Released: September 20, 2020
    [Advance publication] Released: July 24, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The aim of this research was to conduct a concept analysis of “illness perception in children with chronic illness” to reveal its components and definition. Using Rodgers’ concept analysis method, 39 articles were analyzed, subsequently resulting in the extraction of four attributes, four antecedents, and three consequences. “Illness perception in children with chronic illness” was defined as “perceiving physical sensations because of changes in the symptoms in one’s illness, perceiving the various restrictions on activities because of the illness as one’s illness, and interpreting uncertain and ambiguous information and perceiving such information as one’s illness.” The characteristics of “illness perception in children with chronic illness” were “antecedents, attributes, and consequences all influenced by developmental stage” and “illness perception both accompanies dynamic change in the chronic course and leads to the next developmental task.” This research led to suggestions for investigating the direction of support for children with chronic illness from early childhood and their caregivers.

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  • Ryoko Hayashi, Kumiko Ichimura, Kimika Kawanami
    2020 Volume 43 Issue 4 Pages 4_757-4_767
    Published: September 20, 2020
    Released: September 20, 2020
    [Advance publication] Released: July 24, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    This study aimed to shed light on rehabilitation nursing practices among ICU nurses. Semi-structured interviews were performed with seven nurses with ICU nursing experience of five or more years in an institution where rehabilitation nursing in the ICU is actively implemented. Subsequently, a qualitative inductive analysis was performed. Regarding the practice of rehabilitation nursing among ICU nurses, seven categories were identified: support in the ICU, which focuses not only on time in the ICU but also on the patient’s future; maintenance of functioning and regulation of general physical condition in bedbound patients; support that promotes the independence of the patient, even as they are undergoing intensive care; implementation of early mobilization; psychological support for the patient and family; collaboration with other occupations and between nurses; and strengthening of ICU nurses’ competence in rehabilitation nursing. ICU nurses focus on their patient’s future and practice rehabilitation nursing that is closely related to the patient’s life; these items indicate the expertise and important role of ICU nurses on the rehabilitation team.

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  • Analysis of Damage to Hospitals and Impact on Medical Treatment following the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake
    Satoko Iyama, Hitomi Maeda, Chiharu Matsumoto, Kimiyo Nanke, Eiichi N ...
    2020 Volume 43 Issue 4 Pages 4_769-4_777
    Published: September 20, 2020
    Released: September 20, 2020
    [Advance publication] Released: July 03, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    This study examined measures that need to be implemented to allow medical treatment to be performed following a major earthquake. It analyzed damage to health-care facilities in Kumamoto Prefecture after the major earthquake there in 2016 and the damage exerted on medical treatment. The study participants were head nurses and equipment managers in hospitals having 100 or more beds. Data were obtained using semi-structured interviews. The data were analyzed from the following four perspectives: first, the impact of the earthquake on medical treatment and nursing services; second, the damage to lifelines, structures, and medical equipment of facilities; third, the situation regarding disaster response manuals and business continuity plans (BCPs); and fourth, support and health management for medical staff. The results suggested that for a medical facility to continue operations after a major earthquake, it is necessary to implement the following measures, taking into account the equipment and local characteristics of the facility: creating practical disaster response manuals and BCPs; providing disaster prevention education and training, taking into account the inherent disaster vulnerability of the local community; and enhancing staff health management while maintaining operations and collaborating with local and regional facilities during normal times.

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